Market exploration: forward surgical capability

A couple of off-road capable box bodies with tail lifts would be a start, but they would require support. And if you're going down that route then you might as well have a field hospital - and all that entails.

There's a few civvy healthcare organisations that use lorry-based set ups in Africa.
 

Dread

LE
In light of the alleged proposed cuts, human medics will prove too expensive and annoy the Treasury because of head-count and pension liabilities.

Anyone know of a zoo that could donate 20 chimpanzees that could be trained to hand out brufen, tubi-grip and field dressings?
 
Now you're talking.
 
I recall the US and French armies had containerised field hospitals around 40 years ago, but none would meet the requirements stated.

As others have pointed out above, while containers are adaptable, rugged and fairly simple, they're also heavy and require specialist handling equipment and trained operators.
The request is looking for some vehicle in which to carry out primary life saving surgery before the casualty is moved to better facilities for ongoing medical care.
That suggests it needs a supply of electricity for lighting and the various bits of medical equipment like monitors, x-rays, power tools, pumps etc. It also requires a supply of oxygen, any anaesthetic gases, and cold storage for some drugs.
And somewhere to store the medics' PPE, medical instruments, bandages and whatever.
Such work will need at least one surgeon, one an anaesthetist, a couple of nurses, plus the casualty on an operating table that's well illuminated with all requisite equipment to hand.
I'm doubtful that can be achieved within the width of an ISO box, so you'd probably need 2 set up and connected side by side?
You'll want it at ground level for easy access, which means you'll need a crane or large forklift, with trained operator.

You'll need to clean and decontaminate it between patients, so need somewhere to put all the ensuing gash.
So, so far you've a couple of large wagons, a genny, a gas truck, a big FLT or crane, and nearly a dozen troops.
Start hoiking ISOs full of delicate equipment around in the woods, on rough ground, or in other Spartan facilities, and I'd suggest it will be broken fairly soon.
The medics, drivers, sparky, gas tech, plant ops all need accommodation , feeding, latrines, etc.
By which time it's become about platoon size, if not bigger, with a large ground footprint, an ongoing resupply problem for fuel, gases, equipment, expendables, and waste removal.
It also needs to be defended, concealed, have some form of traffic control, a hq/ command/ control bit, comms to other units, and may also need to be CBRN proof.
By which time it's become company sized . . .
A full length hinge along either side at the top of an ISO container, would allow the side panels to swing upwards (as in some expensive cars' gull-wing doors), from the underside of which would then drop down the outside wall of the (to be) extension. A full length hinge along the bottom of each side of the ISO container, would then allow (the previously hidden), floor to then drop down, and lock into the bottom edge of the previously mentioned outside wall. Finally . . . from either end of the ISO container, the end wall ("plugs"), of the extension, would swing out vertically, to securely lock into place the previously lifted roof, and lowered outer wall and floor.

I've long thought about this . . . I use thinking about the mechanism, and its design and development, to lull me to sleep, on many occasion ;) !!

The width of the extension, either side of the ISO container, will be the same as the height of the container . . . which of course can be significant.

Fill the container when "collapsed" with . . .

1). beds to be positioned into the deployed extensions, or

2). as an operating theatre with sensitive equipment securely bolted permanently, to a suspended false floor, to protect against vibration in transit (principle of suspended power units in anti-submarine frigates applies).

The "RCT" already has the DROPS related "specialist equipment" to lift these ISO containers off the back of their skeletal trailers . . . a flatbed with at either end, a Heath Robinson'ish arrangement of hydraulic rams/arms with wire suspended couplings to lock into the top corners of the container.

But why bother? The suggestion can/will work with the containers left "on wheels".

I won't detain readers with the open-sided rectangular "connectors", into which four containers could be "plugged" to form a infinitely extendable medical complex.

I've thought about this . . . ;) !!
 
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In light of the alleged proposed cuts, human medics will prove too expensive and annoy the Treasury because of head-count and pension liabilities.

Anyone know of a zoo that could donate 20 chimpanzees that could be trained to hand out brufen, tubi-grip and field dressings?
Is that 20 including @Dr Death or 20 plus @Dr Death?
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
Whatever happened to ColPro ?
 
A full length hinge along either side at the top of an ISO container, would allow the side panels to swing upwards (as in some expensive cars' gull-wing doors), from the underside of which would then drop down the outside wall of the (to be) extension. A full length hinge along the bottom of each side of the ISO container, would then allow (the previously hidden), floor to then drop down, and lock into the bottom edge of the previously mentioned outside wall. Finally . . . from either end of the ISO container, the end wall ("plugs"), of the extension, would swing out vertically, to securely lock into place the previously lifted roof, and lowered outer wall and floor.

I've long thought about this . . . I use thinking about the mechanism, and its design and development, to lull me to sleep, on many occasion ;) !!

The width of the extension, either side of the ISO container, will be the same as the height of the container . . . which of course can be significant.

Fill the container when "collapsed" with 1). beds to be positioned into the deployed extensions, or 2). as an operating theatre with sensitive equipment securely bolted to a suspended false floor, to protect against vibration in transit (principle of suspended power units in anti-submarine frigates applies).

The "RCT" already has the DROPS related "specialist equipment" to lift these ISO containers off the back of their skeletal trailers . . . a flatbed with at either end, a Heath Robinsonish arrangement of hydraulic rams/arms with wire suspended couplings to lock into the top corners of the container.

But why bother? The suggestion can/will work with the containers left "on wheels".

I won't detain readers with the open-sided rectangular "connectors", into which four containers could be "plugged" to form a infinitely extendable medical complex.

I've thought about this . . . ;) !!
Don't think about it too hard, as it's all been done before. You see such arrangements with exhibition trailers and F1 support vehicles: fold out/down sides and coupled trailer set ups. A 4x4 Winnebago-type SUV would probably be quite useful as a starting point.
 
A full length hinge along either side at the top of an ISO container, would allow the side panels to swing upwards (as in some expensive cars' gull-wing doors), from the underside of which would then drop down the outside wall of the (to be) extension. A full length hinge along the bottom of each side of the ISO container, would then allow (the previously hidden), floor to then drop down, and lock into the bottom edge of the previously mentioned outside wall. Finally . . . from either end of the ISO container, the end wall ("plugs"), of the extension, would swing out vertically, to securely lock into place the previously lifted roof, and lowered outer wall and floor.

I've long thought about this . . . I use thinking about the mechanism, and its design and development, to lull me to sleep, on many occasion ;) !!

The width of the extension, either side of the ISO container, will be the same as the height of the container . . . which of course can be significant.

Fill the container when "collapsed" with 1). beds to be positioned into the deployed extensions, or 2). as an operating theatre with sensitive equipment securely bolted to a suspended false floor, to protect against vibration in transit (principle of suspended power units in anti-submarine frigates applies).

The "RCT" already has the DROPS related "specialist equipment" to lift these ISO containers off the back of their skeletal trailers . . . a flatbed with at either end, a Heath Robinsonish arrangement of hydraulic rams/arms with wire suspended couplings to lock into the top corners of the container.

But why bother? The suggestion can/will work with the containers left "on wheels".

I won't detain readers with the open-sided rectangular "connectors", into which four containers could be "plugged" to form a infinitely extendable medical complex.

I've thought about this . . . ;) !!
The NHS already has such trailers that set up on car parks as mobile clinics. Still require a lot more than 2 personnel to operate them.
 
A 20-40 foot shipping container has the capacity to hold much more than an ambulance, and can be connected together ad infinitum.... Having seen them used on construction sites for site offices, stores, workshops, canteens etc, its a viable consideration. Once fitted out, they can be air lifted anywhere suitable and retrieved just as quick.
The intent is for the whole lot to be carried on two MAN SVs, including personnel and not using shipping containers, just the trucks.
 
A full length hinge along either side at the top of an ISO container, would allow the side panels to swing upwards (as in some expensive cars' gull-wing doors), from the underside of which would then drop down the outside wall of the (to be) extension. A full length hinge along the bottom of each side of the ISO container, would then allow (the previously hidden), floor to then drop down, and lock into the bottom edge of the previously mentioned outside wall. Finally . . . from either end of the ISO container, the end wall ("plugs"), of the extension, would swing out vertically, to securely lock into place the previously lifted roof, and lowered outer wall and floor.

I've long thought about this . . . I use thinking about the mechanism, and its design and development, to lull me to sleep, on many occasion ;) !!

The width of the extension, either side of the ISO container, will be the same as the height of the container . . . which of course can be significant.

Fill the container when "collapsed" with 1). beds to be positioned into the deployed extensions, or 2). as an operating theatre with sensitive equipment securely bolted to a suspended false floor, to protect against vibration in transit (principle of suspended power units in anti-submarine frigates applies).

The "RCT" already has the DROPS related "specialist equipment" to lift these ISO containers off the back of their skeletal trailers . . . a flatbed with at either end, a Heath Robinsonish arrangement of hydraulic rams/arms with wire suspended couplings to lock into the top corners of the container.

But why bother? The suggestion can/will work with the containers left "on wheels".

I won't detain readers with the open-sided rectangular "connectors", into which four containers could be "plugged" to form a infinitely extendable medical complex.

I've thought about this . . . ;) !!
As my comment above, the intent is tentage and all to fit on the back of a MAN (no ISO containers as you have to be able to get them on and off the vehicle), with one other to move personnel.

It’s been trialled already in this format.
 
The MoD could make a start by not binning all the medical professionals that have experience of dealing with such injuries. Any equipment is useless without that skill and knowledge.

At what level do they want this equipment? Secure base location, such as Bastion Hospital? FOB? or fully mobile such as MERT.

It seems to me that this can never be a single approach, but multilayered with capability improving along the chain.

The system worked well in Afghanistan to a point, but if you were injured somewhere like Musa Quala your chances of survival were greatly reduced in comparison to being injured near Gereshk.
Fully mobile, towards front line and with very short IOC times so it can be dropped and setup elsewhere with the minimum of fuss.
Mainly as heliborne MERT is not likely to exist in most places we’re likely to go. Afghanistan was a bit of a one off.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Been done
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napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer

Dr Death

War Hero
So funny, but not unexpected knock the medics when you do not need them.
But when your life hangs in the balance suddenly we are liked.

Strange that!
Im not knocking the medics, I’m knocking you, go and sign out a sense of humour.
 

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