Market exploration: forward surgical capability

The Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) wants to understand the current market capability and development requirements of mobile surgical facilities.

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DROPS containerised -air portable, MASH type containers. Ditto power supplys.

Having in the past fitted out generators in shipping containers for the oil industry, it must be possible to fit out shipping containers with the required medical facilities to the level of medical help required. All Air portable.
 
Isn't that description basically an ambulance?

A 20-40 foot shipping container has the capacity to hold much more than an ambulance, and can be connected together ad infinitum.... Having seen them used on construction sites for site offices, stores, workshops, canteens etc, its a viable consideration. Once fitted out, they can be air lifted anywhere suitable and retrieved just as quick.
 
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A 20-40 foot shipping container has the capacity to hold much more than an ambulance, and can be connected together ad infinitum.... Having seen them used on construction sites for site offices, stores, workshops, canteens etc, its a viable consideration. Once fitted out, they can be air lifted anywhere suitable and retrieved just as quick.
That’s more shitty than a shitty thing on a shitty day in shitsville, shitshire, shitland.

Go and stand in the corner.
 

aardvark64

War Hero
5m drop test?
 
A 20-40 foot shipping container has the capacity to hold much more than an ambulance, and can be connected together ad infinitum.... Having seen them used on construction sites for site offices, stores, workshops, canteens etc, its a viable consideration. Once fitted out, they can be air lifted anywhere suitable and retrieved just as quick.
The problem with that is containers are heavy and would need firm, level, prepared ground to be situated on or else they will sink. This also creates problems if you are trying to link them together on uneven surfaces.
Great for setting up on car parks, and other hard surfaces, not good for in the 'field'.
Unlike tents.
 
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The MoD could make a start by not binning all the medical professionals that have experience of dealing with such injuries. Any equipment is useless without that skill and knowledge.

At what level do they want this equipment? Secure base location, such as Bastion Hospital? FOB? or fully mobile such as MERT.

It seems to me that this can never be a single approach, but multilayered with capability improving along the chain.

The system worked well in Afghanistan to a point, but if you were injured somewhere like Musa Quala your chances of survival were greatly reduced in comparison to being injured near Gereshk.
 
Heavy lift helicopters, sky cranes, sikorsky, just behind the lines, nearest secure location,............... As previously stated, a viable consideration nothing more!
Which of the few 'heavy lift helicopters' in commercial operation do you suggest? How far do you want to move these 40' ISO containers? How do you get these 40' ISO containers from storage to the forward area where they're required? Viable? Don't think so.
 

Endoscope

War Hero
Desirable requirements
  • complete solution: fully integrated solution, including transportation, which is fully self-sufficient
  • low personnel demands: deployable by 2 or 3 personnel, with low training demand
  • modifiable: Army has certain technologies that will need to be integrated into the solution, such as medical equipment and machines, and communication devices
What we want
We are particularly interested in turn-key, fully-integrated solutions which provide mobile surgical capabilities designed for deployment in austere environments, such as those with very limited access to infrastructure, utilities and resupply. We are also interested in solutions with the potential to be developed into fully-integrated solutions.

What we don’t want
We are not interested in solutions that will require sophisticated infrastructure, logistical chain or need a high degree of training in order to deploy.


The last bit precludes helicopters to deliver it I'm assuming
 
Heavy lift helicopters, sky cranes, sikorsky, just behind the lines, nearest secure location,............... As previously stated, a viable consideration nothing more!
I failed my first flight in a Skycrane when I walked out to the dispersal to find the was no Skycrane. We hadn’t bought any.
 
The Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) wants to understand the current market capability and development requirements of mobile surgical facilities.
Well... its come to the right place!

So essentially, you want an inflatable Selĺy Oak that runs off half a dozen AA batteries and can be stuffed into a kidney pouch? Good luck... as they say at German railway stations.
 
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I recall the US and French armies had containerised field hospitals around 40 years ago, but none would meet the requirements stated.

As others have pointed out above, while containers are adaptable, rugged and fairly simple, they're also heavy and require specialist handling equipment and trained operators.
The request is looking for some vehicle in which to carry out primary life saving surgery before the casualty is moved to better facilities for ongoing medical care.
That suggests it needs asupply of electricity for lighting and the various bits of medical equipment like monitors, xrays, power tools, pumps etc. It also requires a supply of oxygen, any anaesthetic gases, and cold storage for some drugs.
And somewhere to store the medics' PPE, medical instruments, bandages and whatever.
Such work will need at least one surgeon, one anaesthetist, a couple of nurses, plus the casualty on an operating table that's well illuminated with all requisite equipment to hand.
I'm doubtful that can be achieved within the width of an ISO box, so you'd probably need 2 set up and connected side by side?
You'll want it at ground level for easy access, which means you'll need a crane or large forklift, with trained operator.
You'll need to clean and decontaminate it between patients, so need somewhere to put all the ensuing gash.
So, so far you've a couple of large wagons, a genny, a gas truck, a big FLT or crane, and nearly a dozen troops.
Start hoiking ISOs full of delicate equipment around in the woods, on rough ground, or in other Spartan facilities, and I'd suggest it will be broken fairly soon.
The medics, drivers, sparky, gas tech, plant ops all need accommodation , feeding, latrines, etc.
By which time it's become about platoon size, if not bigger, with a large ground footprint, an ongoing resupply problem for fuel, gases, equipment, expendables, and waste removal.
It also needs to be defended, concealed, have some form of traffic control, a hq/ command/ control bit, comms to other units, and may also need to be CBRN proof.
By which time it's become company sized.

Alternatively, a couple of combat medics in a landrover sized light truck, a haversack full of field dressings and a bag of scalpels and sutures?
 
A 20-40 foot shipping container has the capacity to hold much more than an ambulance, and can be connected together ad infinitum.... Having seen them used on construction sites for site offices, stores, workshops, canteens etc, its a viable consideration. Once fitted out, they can be air lifted anywhere suitable and retrieved just as quick.
Your problem with heli lifting it is it's difficult to put it down anywhere but a wide open space.
Flying in x number of containers, then y number of casevacs, will almost certainly attract the attention of hostiles, who will likely spoil your day thereafter.
 

Dr Death

War Hero
Field Hospital's are so yesterday.
 

potter

Old-Salt
Reading DASA requirements is somewhat depressing. The "what we're looking for" in Endoscope's post is entirely worthy, but DASA surely know that if such a unicorn existed it would have been publicised and marketed to death. Instead DASA resort to generating a long list of requirements that would need to be traded off against each other when real solutions (or part solutions) are looked at, and don't give any indication as to priority or weighting. Industry's left wondering why they should both submitting responses given that they'll certainly be non compliant with the moon-on-a-stick wishlist.
 

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