Marines Work and Live Hard in Afghanistan

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Skynet, Aug 22, 2009.

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  1. Marines Work and Live Hard in Afghanistan
    No Beds, No Running Water and No Complaints from the Marines of Echo Company
    By Lara Logan

    Combat Outpost Sharp
    Combat Outpost Sharp in Helmand Provence, Afghanistan, has been home to Echo Company for almost two months. Lara Logan reports on the how the Marines fought the Taliban for the old school building.

    The Taliban has threatened to cut off the fingers of voters in Afghanistan's presidential election. The Taliban is hoping that fear will prevent faith in the election results. Lara Logan reports.
    STORIES
    Votes Cast, Now Posturing in Afghanistan
    In Taliban Strongholds, Voter Turnout Low
    (CBS) The U.S. Marines from Echo Company are in Afghanistan with a mission to hunt down the Taliban in dangerous Helmand Province so that voters could get to the polls yesterday. They weren't always successful and voter turnout was very low.

    But, as CBS News Chief Foreign Affairs correspondent Lara Logan reports from the frontlines, Echo Company is used to a challenge. More than 200 strong, the company served eight tours in Iraq. This is their first tour in Afghanistan. They arrived on July 2nd and have been operating in some of the worst conditions imaginable.

    Combat Outpost Sharp, an old school building, has been home to Echo Company for almost two months now. Taliban fighters battled these marines as they fought their way to the school. Now the marines use this as a base to launch attacks on the Taliban.

    "When we first came here this place was disgusting - it had syringes on the ground, human waste, it was just absolutely filthy and while it's not the Taj Mahal right now, we have made this into a place where the Marines can operate out of, comfortably really," says Lt. T. Tompkins, a 27-year-old from Nashville, Tenn. "The dust, the mud, the canals - none of that goes away. There's no escaping it, you know, you just have to make your peace with it."
    More But what about the poor Hygiene standards! Seems they are doing what the Brits have been doing for a few years now.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/08/21/eveningnews/main5258632.shtml