Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence

Yokel

LE
Seventy miles northwest of New York City is a hospital that looks like a prison, its drab brick buildings wrapped in layers of fencing and barbed wire. This grim facility is called the Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Institute. It’s one of three places the state of New York sends the criminally mentally ill—defendants judged not guilty by reason of insanity.

Until recently, my wife Jackie—Dr. Jacqueline Berenson—was a senior psychiatrist there. Many of Mid-Hudson’s 300 patients are killers and arsonists. At least one is a cannibal. Most have been diagnosed with psychotic disorders like schizophrenia that provoked them to violence against family members or strangers.

A couple of years ago, Jackie was telling me about a patient. In passing, she said something like, Of course he’d been smoking pot his whole life.

Of course? I said.

Yes, they all smoke.

So marijuana causes schizophrenia?

I was surprised, to say the least. I tended to be a libertarian on drugs. Years before, I’d covered the pharmaceutical industry for The New York Times. I was aware of the claims about marijuana as medicine, and I’d watched the slow spread of legalized cannabis without much interest.

Jackie would have been within her rights to say, I know what I’m talking about, unlike you. Instead she offered something neutral like, I think that’s what the big studies say. You should read them.

So I did. The big studies, the little ones, and all the rest. I read everything I could find. I talked to every psychiatrist and brain scientist who would talk to me. And I soon realized that in all my years as a journalist I had never seen a story where the gap between insider and outsider knowledge was so great, or the stakes so high.

I began to wonder why—with the stocks of cannabis companies soaring and politicians promoting legalization as a low-risk way to raise tax revenue and reduce crime—I had never heard the truth about marijuana, mental illness, and violence.


Continued here: Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Analysis / Bias

In review, Imprimis uses minimal loaded words in their headlines and minimally editorialize the speech transcripts they publish. However, almost all of the speakers are conservative and present opinions with a right wing bias. They do not use outside sourcing of information as the source is the speaker. Imprimis speakers are not always factual in their statements. For example in January 2010 Speaker of the House Paul Ryan spoke at Hillsdale College and claimed that the Affordable Care Act will result in rationing of healthcare. According to Politifact this is a mostly false statement.
Just sayin'
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Seventy miles northwest of New York City is a hospital that looks like a prison, its drab brick buildings wrapped in layers of fencing and barbed wire. This grim facility is called the Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Institute. It’s one of three places the state of New York sends the criminally mentally ill—defendants judged not guilty by reason of insanity.

Until recently, my wife Jackie—Dr. Jacqueline Berenson—was a senior psychiatrist there. Many of Mid-Hudson’s 300 patients are killers and arsonists. At least one is a cannibal. Most have been diagnosed with psychotic disorders like schizophrenia that provoked them to violence against family members or strangers.

A couple of years ago, Jackie was telling me about a patient. In passing, she said something like, Of course he’d been smoking pot his whole life.

Of course? I said.

Yes, they all smoke.

So marijuana causes schizophrenia?

I was surprised, to say the least. I tended to be a libertarian on drugs. Years before, I’d covered the pharmaceutical industry for The New York Times. I was aware of the claims about marijuana as medicine, and I’d watched the slow spread of legalized cannabis without much interest.

Jackie would have been within her rights to say, I know what I’m talking about, unlike you. Instead she offered something neutral like, I think that’s what the big studies say. You should read them.

So I did. The big studies, the little ones, and all the rest. I read everything I could find. I talked to every psychiatrist and brain scientist who would talk to me. And I soon realized that in all my years as a journalist I had never seen a story where the gap between insider and outsider knowledge was so great, or the stakes so high.

I began to wonder why—with the stocks of cannabis companies soaring and politicians promoting legalization as a low-risk way to raise tax revenue and reduce crime—I had never heard the truth about marijuana, mental illness, and violence.

Continued here: Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence
What's your take or 'analysis' (per the forum title) or was this just a straight cut and paste?
 
What's your take or 'analysis' (per the forum title) or was this just a straight cut and paste?
I know. Sir, sir, I know.
 

Yokel

LE
What's your take or 'analysis' (per the forum title) or was this just a straight cut and paste?
Sorry forgot to say. I believe there is a link between the increase in the use of very strong Cannabis and the increasing rate of mental illness in the young.
 
Ahhhh, makes total sense, if the cannibal wasn’t smoking the marijuana, he wouldn’t have got the munchies and started eating people..........I guess weed is the root of all evil, Canada will need to build a shïte load of new institutions to deal with the approaching tidal wave of up and coming psycho’s and schizo’s.

Edmit; Nice to see another bias slanted article on marijuana with the same arguments circa 1950....
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
A reminder to all:

There has been a recent trend of people posting only links, or cut and pastes from articles sourced elsewhere.

Whilst it's acceptable to use extracts to support a point, the source should be clear, and there should be accompanying analysis or discussion.

Don't post only links, or only cut and paste articles or extracts. This includes memes.
 
The loving, giggly, cannabis of the 60-70's, has morphed into the crazy skunk of the 2.ooo's.

It's the difference between real ale and 75% abv of absinthe....... small wonder space cadets are taking off and never returning.
 

JNM

War Hero
Do think people focusing on legalising weed are more concerned about getting stoned and “it’s not as bad as 10 pints of vodka” rather than looking seriously at counter points towards its carcinogenicity, interactions in the brain etc. Generally just using “it sometimes helps a few types of advanced cancers” as proof it’s 10,000% safe and trying to market it as a 19th century style cure all.
 
Do think people focusing on legalising weed are more concerned about getting stoned and “it’s not as bad as 10 pints of vodka” rather than looking seriously at counter points towards its carcinogenicity, interactions in the brain etc. Generally just using “it sometimes helps a few types of advanced cancers” as proof it’s 10,000% safe and trying to market it as a 19th century style cure all.
Until the 1950s hemp was legal. It wasn’t called cannabis except by biologists and the term marijuana hadn’t been invented. People made clothes out of it, people made paper out of it and a few people smoked it. Oh and people like my grandfather who had a chemists shop in Small Heath made medicines out of it.

Then powerful lobbies like the duPonts and Randolph Hearst sought to ban it because their nylon and paper businesses were affected. Step forward 30 years and the US couldn’t make protesting against Vietnam illegal but they could make what they smoked illegal. So we ended up with a completely unnecessary demonisation of hemp.

Pushing it underground meant that drug dealers hybridised hippy dope into skunk and fucked with the brains of kids. And it meant that no real research has been done on the medicinal benefits of cannabis.

I’ve seen people utterly screwed by doctor prescribed opioids get off them by taking a simple tincture of cannabis. The one my grandfather made 70 years ago. I’ve seen people with terminal cancers live far longer than their doctors told them they would. I’ve seen know people whose tumours have shrunk and disappeared. I know lots of people, including many ex soldiers, whose PTSD is managed by taking cannabis oils. And I’ve seen plenty of young people who suffer massive anxiety issues from smoking skunk as kids turn thelr lives around through taking oils.

So no, those of us who promote legalising medicinal cannabis do not do so because we want to get stoned. We do so because it works and because we are constantly lied to by big pharma. Do not confuse medicinal cannabis and dope.
 

Yokel

LE
Until the 1950s hemp was legal. It wasn’t called cannabis except by biologists and the term marijuana hadn’t been invented. People made clothes out of it, people made paper out of it and a few people smoked it. Oh and people like my grandfather who had a chemists shop in Small Heath made medicines out of it.

Then powerful lobbies like the duPonts and Randolph Hearst sought to ban it because their nylon and paper businesses were affected. Step forward 30 years and the US couldn’t make protesting against Vietnam illegal but they could make what they smoked illegal. So we ended up with a completely unnecessary demonisation of hemp.

Pushing it underground meant that drug dealers hybridised hippy dope into skunk and fucked with the brains of kids. And it meant that no real research has been done on the medicinal benefits of cannabis.

I’ve seen people utterly screwed by doctor prescribed opioids get off them by taking a simple tincture of cannabis. The one my grandfather made 70 years ago. I’ve seen people with terminal cancers live far longer than their doctors told them they would. I’ve seen know people whose tumours have shrunk and disappeared. I know lots of people, including many ex soldiers, whose PTSD is managed by taking cannabis oils. And I’ve seen plenty of young people who suffer massive anxiety issues from smoking skunk as kids turn thelr lives around through taking oils.

So no, those of us who promote legalising medicinal cannabis do not do so because we want to get stoned. We do so because it works and because we are constantly lied to by big pharma. Do not confuse medicinal cannabis and dope.
That shows how complex the issue is. A free for all that exposed teenagers to contaminated Skunk would be terrible, but perhaps there is an argument for allowing weed of a known strength and purity?

The medical uses of it need research so that future use of policy making can be based on evidence.
 
Do think people focusing on legalising weed are more concerned about getting stoned and “it’s not as bad as 10 pints of vodka” rather than looking seriously at counter points towards its carcinogenicity, interactions in the brain etc. Generally just using “it sometimes helps a few types of advanced cancers” as proof it’s 10,000% safe and trying to market it as a 19th century style cure all.
Right - might as well have a complete ban on smoking of any sorts then.
 
Sorry forgot to say. I believe there is a link between the increase in the use of very strong Cannabis and the increasing rate of mental illness in the young.
Doing any bloody thing (most) in excess is going to cause trouble - and weed is no exception. It's just that there seems to be an inherent bias against it for illogical reasons even when so many reports and data keep saying it's less harmful than so many other substances out there, including the most obvious ones - tobacco and alcohol. I don't smoke, so I couldn't care less, but I support legalization of it. The hypocrisy of the attitudes sometimes beggars belief!

Mental illness is a very complex subject (I should know) and linking it to one specific reason is just moronic. Is it causal? Maybe, but so are many things out there which cause mental health issues.
 
That shows how complex the issue is. A free for all that exposed teenagers to contaminated Skunk would be terrible, but perhaps there is an argument for allowing weed of a known strength and purity?

The medical uses of it need research so that future use of policy making can be based on evidence.
I think a Canada style approach will see a move back towards hippy dope. Take the drug pushers out and sell it legally and there’s no need to push skunk.

My own view of the medicinal issue is that there’s space for complementary medicines alongside genuine pharmaceutical products. The last thing we need is for big pharma to exclude or price out old style tinctures and products like Rick Simpson Oil.

All you need to make a tincture is bush cannabis and high strength alcohol. Boil off the alcohol and you have RSO. It doesn’t need complicating. Get rid of the cannabis ban and these could very easily be registered as complementaries.

Watch this space.
 
Doing any bloody thing (most) in excess is going to cause trouble - and weed is no exception. It's just that there seems to be an inherent bias against it for illogical reasons even when so many reports and data keep saying it's less harmful than so many other substances out there, including the most obvious ones - tobacco and alcohol. I don't smoke, so I couldn't care less, but I support legalization of it. The hypocrisy of the attitudes sometimes beggars belief!

Mental illness is a very complex subject (I should know) and linking it to one specific reason is just moronic. Is it causal? Maybe, but so are many things out there which cause mental health issues.
Strong cannabis fucks the dopamine pathways in undeveloped brains. Your brain isn’t fully developed until your early 20s. Smoking high THC cannabis causes all sorts of mental health issues in early adulthood.

Interestingly, low strength cannabis oils can be very beneficial for managing anxiety. Food grade hemp oil has less than 0.5% cannabinoids; it’s made from industrial hemp. Push the percentage up to about 3% by adding a small quantitity of cannabis oil and take a spoonful a day. Costs **** all, no anxiety attacks. It’s works for many cases of PTSD too.
 

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