Maplin Cheapo Noise Cancelling headphones

#3
maguire said:
for the same money you can buy the Sennheiser CX300s - they block out a lot of outside noise without active electronics (I use them on the Tube every day) and sound absolutely superb.

http://www.richersounds.com/showproduct.php?cda=showproduct&pid=SENN-CX300-MK2-BLK

in fact, you can now get the mk.2's for the same money - making the originals at £25 a no-brainer imho.
Ive got a pair of them! Seconded , theyre great , although I killed the first ones (think I got sweat in them). Comfy , good sound, stay in your ears when youre running :thumright:
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
I've been thinking about the more expensive Sennheisers (the £70-80 ones). can anyone say of the difference is that pronounced for the extra cash?
 
#5
I've found that any fancy-schmancy electronic noise cancelling tends to take away from the sound quality. They haven't really got it right yet, and the closest ones to being right are bloody expensive. Its just not really necessary if the sound insulation is good enough and you don't mind the sort of close-in-clinical-detail that comes with closed-back designs. Sennheiser are very good at this noise insulation business and all of their headphones have goodbye-world levels of insulation. They are more serviceable too, with user-replaceable cables. The Maplins look rather cheap and nasty and I doubt that whatever technology they're using to cancel noise is going to be much cop. Less than £50 will get you one of the lower rungs (but still in a different world to Maplin) of Sennheiser that are designed for monitoring audio in noisy environments i.e. clubs or when filming with a professional camera.

There are some other good makes too, but there is nothing to fault with Sennheiser (they are class leaders as they are) and the fact that if you adversely tweak the cable somehow you just have to order a new cable and plug it in yourself instead of sending it off and paying for labour puts it ahead.

Just my 2 satang.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
in ear - the small over ear ones I dont like, the bigger ones that completely cover your ears are too bulky to carry aroud all the time - although they do sound amazing, I've got a pair of the Sennheiser pro dj ones here somewhere.
 
#8
maguire said:
in ear - the small over ear ones I dont like, the bigger ones that completely cover your ears are too bulky to carry aroud all the time - although they do sound amazing, I've got a pair of the Sennheiser pro dj ones here somewhere.
I think you will definitely notice the difference when spending the best part of £100 on a pair. I steadily upgraded from £25 jobbies to £200 ones and you do get what you pay for. The law of diminishing returns doesn't seem to be in force to a significant degree with in-ear phones.

I'm a fan of Shure in-ears because they good robust construction (nice thick cables that would be very hard to snap), and they have really good levels of clarity without being measly with the lower frequencies. Recently Sennheiser have come out with the IE range. I've never given them a go but I wish I'd waited for them because I listen to alot of bass heavy music and they also feature replaceable cables. The cables are probably the most accident and fcukup prone part and when you have a piece of kit that cost that much its really no fun sending it off and waiting for them to deal with your warranty claim or having to pay through the nose to get it fixed because the warranty ran out (been there).

£90 gets you an IE 6. If you are veeeeerrry very careful with your things or you think you'll be luckier than me then definitely give the Shures a look too.
 
#10
In my experience, the only really effective ones are the active over the ear ones (i.e. a separate battery is doing the active noise reduction) - all the rest are simply doing some rather clever noise manipulation, but by definition what's going on is attenuation, so you'll be experiencing the loss somewhere.

I had some great (and comparatively cheap) altec lansing headphones. Combined with ear cheese these made a Herc journey bearable!
 
#12
maguire said:
for the same money you can buy the Sennheiser CX300s - they block out a lot of outside noise without active electronics (I use them on the Tube every day) and sound absolutely superb.

http://www.richersounds.com/showproduct.php?cda=showproduct&pid=SENN-CX300-MK2-BLK

in fact, you can now get the mk.2's for the same money - making the originals at £25 a no-brainer imho.
Brilliant, cheers.

For studying I'm thinking an MP3 player with birdsong download, if I can find a place to get a free download.

I bought some foam ear defenders suposedly for travelling from Asda yesterday (noisy neighbours). Six pairs of memory foam for £1.74, and pretty effective. I still got woken up at 5am this morning, but without the massive adrenaline dump and a naked march into the kitchen for the big knife :x
 
#16
Hmmm... Amplivox over the earpieces. Looks fine in the back of a Herc or Tri-star (used to do it all the time). Looks a bit crap in BA, especially when wearing a suit. Also the Amplivox take up a bit of space (I hate travelling with baggage).

Apart from Sennheiser anyone know any good and not outrageously expensive earpieces?
 
#17
The Shure Se110-N and Klipsch Custom 1 or 2s are two sets of phones I would recommend and all three run from around 45 to 60 pounds down Amazon UK.



Custom 1



Custom 2

 
#18
Its important to consider what kind of music you'll mostly be putting through them too. Etymotic and Klipsch I find slightly top heavy... a bit too sharp, maybe best suited for Classical music, or music that isn't meant to be that chunky and meaty. The more expensive Shure's have their signature full bodied midrange that's really good for guitar + drums + bass band music and I do think they reproduce the best vocals. They handle electronic music well too because they have dedicated micro-tweeters and woofers inside that tiny enclosure. Haven't got any experience of Sennheiser in-ear-phones but reviewers of the IE range described the bass response as "cataclysmic" and I know Sennheiser make good kit so I wouldn't expect them to be lacking in other aspects either.

The right earphones are the ones that make the music that you listen to sound best to you.

Cnet.co.uk do good well reasoned reviews without getting too technical.
 

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