Map reading

Discussion in 'Army Reserve' started by red77, Mar 1, 2006.

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  1. Thought I would ask this here as I am joining the TA (21sas).

    I want to start map reading skills before I start the course just to have the basics of it.

    Anyone know of a good web site that I can look at for information on map reading or orienteering to get me started.

    I tried a google search but not getting anywhere.
    As soon as I have the basics I will go out with a map a compass and start practicing. :p
  2. Or try the OS website -
    (then click the 'mapreading made easy' link)

    Best way to get comfortable with a map is to practice, practice and practice again. Get out on the ground. See which features change and which don't.

    May I suggest some hills in South Wales as a good place to start.

  3. I agree with everything said above. Could I also recommend:

    Mountaincraft and Leadership by Eric Langmuir. About £15, it's an old 'un but a good 'un.
  4. Apart from the map reading start learning that you don't mention 21 - just say TA. It works just as well and you won't sound like a walt or get embarrassed if you don't make it
  5. Wow, no need for Selection? You must be good...

    Seriously, I've talked to some guys that have gone through Selection - the DS will teach you EVERYTHING you need to know about navigation.

    Concentrate on fitness.
  6. You’re a funny bunch of fookers

    Cheers Red
  7. Langmuir is revised every so often so unless you get it second hand it should be fairly up to date. If you are going to be spending much time on the hills (and from what I hear you will need to) it is an excellent addition to your library. Mountaineering - The Freedom of the Hills is also very good, but maybe a bit more advanced than you need.
  8. I would like to point out that map reading and navigation are two differing skills

    Map Reading is the art of reading the map and understanding what the funny symbols are

    Navigation is using the map effectively, I know many a person who are great with maps but couldn't navigate out a paper bag.

    For selection navigation 10 simple rules

    1. Trust your compass
    2. Learn and remember the DST model
    3. Stay off the tracks
    4. Learn to march on a bearing without looking at your compass very 5 mins
    5. DO NOT mark your map in any way, learn how to fold and remember where you are and where you are going
    6. Set and adhere to your backdrops
    7. Learn contour lines and plan your route, note the easiest route is not always the best route time wise
    8. During night navs, if you are sure of your RV, trust yourself, the DS have a nasty habit of hiding
    9. Pay attention to your surroundings, keep your drills as you never know whos watching and night time is no excuse for sloppiness
    10. Most of all believe in your self

    From personal experience no 1 is THE most important
  9. Buy a GPS....
  10. You'll need to keep up with your fitness the 1st few weeks, there is lots of fitness stuff before you start being let out on the hills.

    As recommended before the "Soldiers Pocket Book" is good for a start, but recommend going out in spare time and practice. Carrying a Bergan would be good too.
  11. I agree with wellyhead.

    I can do the theory of map reading excellently, but put me out there on the hills and I have to work really hard. (and keep looking at my compass)

    Incorporate the navigation into your fitness training. When you don't have all day try orienteering. This helps you with all aspects. Try the British Orienteering Federation website to find out about local events.

    There are also long distance events you can do.
  12. The 'Mountaincraft and Leadership by Eric Langmuir' mentioned above is excellent! There has been a recent revision to include the new CRoW legislation, but in terms of map-reading savvy you can get the same quality of instruction from any of the editions really.