Manufacturing in the UK

Landowners were compensated for the land that was requisitioned. The canals and railways were all private enterprises and used significant amounts of shareholder capital to buy land. I commend Christian Wolmar’s book Fire and Steam for a clear explanation of how the railways were funded.

If you want an example of government sequestering property, the nationalising of the railways is a good one. The shareholders in the railway companies were not compensated at all for the physical assets that were nationalised.

It couldn’t happen today; property rights are now enshrined in human rights law. The only recourse is compulsory purchase.

The land was requisitioned by Acts Of Parliament. A Parliament that was elected by a a tiny proportion of the country, and in no way reflective of Democracy as we recognise it now. The idea that compulsory purchase of land for national infrastructure projects is either new or somehow breaks ”hundreds of years of democracy“ is counter-factual.

During the railway building boom, landowners were compensated, and the more powerful and influential they were, the better they were compensated.
 
The land was requisitioned by Acts Of Parliament. A Parliament that was elected by a a tiny proportion of the country, and in no way reflective of Democracy as we recognise it now. The idea that compulsory purchase of land for national infrastructure projects is either new or somehow breaks ”hundreds of years of democracy“ is counter-factual.

During the railway building boom, landowners were compensated, and the more powerful and influential they were, the better they were compensated.
The land mostly belonged to the tiny proportion of the country that elected representatives. The Acts of Parliament rarely had a smooth ride. The railway companies often chose diversions to get around intransigent land owners or paid premiums for land. Parliament made the railway owners negotiate a route before Acts were passed.

In any case, it’s largely irrelevant. When the canals and railways were built, there were a relatively tiny number of land owners. The laws around ownership and owners rights date back to those Parliaments but they now protect a large part of the population and are enshrined in human rights law.

Good luck to any government that attempts to sequester the property rights of its electorate. Just watch inward investment evaporate and court cases multiply.
 
In addition to the compensation enjoyed by the very few, already spectacularly wealthy landowners whose land was crossed by railways, they often placed absurd conditions on the railway operators as part of the deal.

In my yoof I worked on the Badminton estate, home of The Duke of Beaufort in Wiltshire / Gloucestershire / Avon depending on a) who you listen to and b) quite literally, which part of it you’re standing on. Still on the books is the right of the Duke to have any train stopped to allow him to alight at Badminton station. Several Express services a week were timetabled to stop there regardless of whether or not he planned to use it but even though it stopped, only the family were permitted to use the station, not that any other locals, all of whom would have been estate staff would be nipping up to London for a night on the piss anyway.

A similar arrangement was in place for the Duke of Portland at Welbeck Abbey which no doubt some here will not have been able to use when attending Welbeck College back when it was run by the Army.

Whilst twittering on about how the railway would impede good hunting runs and disturb grouse etc, what none of the landed gentry would have mentioned, despite it being inconceivable they would fail to recognise it, is the huge benefits railways would have brought to previously isolated estates. These estates were essentially huge farms and now they could get their produce, particularly fresh produce to much larger markets quickly enough before it spoiled. Not for nothing we’re the first overnight trains into London termini called Milk Trains. It also meant that now the elite could enjoy London during the week and weekend in the country. The coining of the term “weekend” coincides with the advent of the railways.

And now, back to the studio for something relevant to the thread!
 
Here’s something relevant. Is UK manufacturing resilient to inflation?
No !!

We may be an "island", but that does not isolate us from increased prices, "inflationary pressures", within the "supply chain" from abroad, for energy, finance, raw materials, component parts/structures.

Our own Government can control interest rates, taxes, the minimum wage, etc., but such actions, "levers", only mitigate against the influences from outside, over which we have no control . . . gas prices no . . . oil prices in 1973-5, which OPEC increased unnecessarily, and disproportionately, the price of crude oil, at the behest of Sheikh (Ahmed Zaki) Yamani.

"Yamani became a close adviser to the Saudi government in 1958 and then became oil minister in 1962. He is known for his role during the 1973 oil embargo, when he spurred OPEC to quadruple the price of crude oil".

 
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There’s a reckoning coming. Zombie, debt fuelled businesses. Rentiers sitting on inflated assets. Public sector bodies that have hidden debt and never balance their books.
Way beyond my area of knowledge. There’s another, much bigger reckoning coming IMHO; paying off the cost of employers‘ and Government borrowing / spending on Covid. There will be a wholesale squeeze on pay and benefits and a concerted campaign of increasing hours, “efficiencies” and taxes.

The truly wealthy (ie not the Corbynomics version which seems to be “anyone in work”) will be largely immune, the serially idle will be left untouched and the ordinary people are going to end up with an arreshole the size of Texas.
 
There’s a reckoning coming. Zombie, debt fuelled businesses. Rentiers sitting on inflated assets. Public sector bodies that have hidden debt and never balance their books.
It has been suggested that your description could be applied to the "model" on which the whole Chinese economy is based.
 
Was that the famous four towers near Ironbridge?

Good point about design, should be easier to make these small reactors "blend in".
That'll be the one, I only noticed it wasn't there when I was driving near there in the evening and realised that the red light on the chimney was gone.
 

endure

GCM
They will be able to afford to offer everyone (within a certain radius), free electricity for eternity . . . which will nullify any potential objections ;) .
Heard that promise before - we were told in the 50s that nuclear power would bring us free eleccy for eternity and now the bastardng stuff is even more expensive than ever
 
Heard that promise before - we were told in the 50s that nuclear power would bring us free eleccy for eternity and now the bastardng stuff is even more expensive than ever
Yes, of course . . . but, my comment was specifically directed towards overcoming NIMBYs, and how their objections could be "bought-off" .
 
Yes, of course . . . but, my comment was specifically directed towards overcoming NIMBYs, and how their objections could be "bought-off" .
Absolutely - and it is a great idea RCT

Our local wind farm contributes to a community fund which has so far built and maintained a community centre and will build a swimming pool as well as assisting a number of other community projects.

Not quite the same as direct help for a ratepayer but similar - a price the energy firm had to pay for despoiling one of the dullest hills I have ever seen
 

Yokel

LE
The last time a news story about Ford at Dagenham was posted it focused on diesel engine production, which prompted discussion about their long term viability. Today MTD MFG has stories about going all electric at another UK plant, and about JCB investing in hydrogen engines.

These are important and interesting, however, the thing that catches my eye relates to both skills and system integration.

Investment in the engineers of the future as iconsys creates 16 new jobs

Not many jobs, particularly as this thread has highlighted things such as new plants creating hundreds of jobs, but the detail of what the company does interests me.

iconsys, which provides industrial automation, enterprise integration and sustainable services, is in the final stages of its relocation to a 17,500 sq ft site on Stafford Park that will deliver a substantial increase in available manufacturing floorspace, a new technology demonstration/training area, an amphitheatre and an office of the future for agile working.

As part of the move, additional software, electrical and mechanical engineers have been recruited to help the company continue to provide end-to-end solutions to blue chip customers in their core sectors of automotive, construction materials, fast-moving consumer goods, food & beverage, marine, metals, pulp & paper and smart infrastructure.
 
The land mostly belonged to the tiny proportion of the country that elected representatives. The Acts of Parliament rarely had a smooth ride. The railway companies often chose diversions to get around intransigent land owners or paid premiums for land. Parliament made the railway owners negotiate a route before Acts were passed.

In any case, it’s largely irrelevant. When the canals and railways were built, there were a relatively tiny number of land owners. The laws around ownership and owners rights date back to those Parliaments but they now protect a large part of the population and are enshrined in human rights law.

Good luck to any government that attempts to sequester the property rights of its electorate. Just watch inward investment evaporate and court cases multiply.
You’re trying to re-write history. In one year alone 3,000 miles of wayleave was granted by Act of Parliament.

Your argument has swung 180% away from property rights being protectd by ”hundreds of years of democracy“ to being protected by modern human rights law. I’ll take that as you conceding that your original statement was nonsense.

Incidentally, here is a link to a document describing an extant compulsory purchase scheme for a national infrastructure project.
 
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Allan74

Old-Salt
Thereby destroying centuries old ownership rights that underpin democracy.
Totally agree, so how about then, when any hippie, Nimby, Leftie, Rightie, Green objects to any new power station...we disconnect the objectors from the Grid.

They clearly don't want electricity so f56k 'em.
 

Allan74

Old-Salt
Absolutely - and it is a great idea RCT

Our local wind farm contributes to a community fund which has so far built and maintained a community centre and will build a swimming pool as well as assisting a number of other community projects.

Not quite the same as direct help for a ratepayer but similar - a price the energy firm had to pay for despoiling one of the dullest hills I have ever seen
That stuff you are talking about is paid for by the 20% green levy on your bill. Green bollox - a method to take money from poorer people via Green Levies so HMG can give it to a34eholes for their 40k electric car and 10k heat pumps.
 

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