Manufacturing in the UK

This relates to possible future manufacturing: Rolls Royce's all electric 'Spirit of innovation' powers through another milestone on its way to a World record

Rolls-Royce has successfully completed the taxiing of its ‘Spirit of Innovation’ aircraft, the latest milestone on its journey to becoming the world’s fastest all-electric plane. For the first time, the plane powered along a runway propelled by its powerful 500hp [400kw] electric powertrain and the latest energy storage technology developed to set world speed records and enable a new generation of urban air mobility concepts.

The taxiing of the plane is a critical test of the integration of the aircraft’s propulsion system, ahead of actual flight-testing. The first flight is planned for the Spring and when at full power the combination of electrical powertrain and advanced battery system will power the aircraft to more than 300mph, setting a new world speed record for electric flight.

Minister for Business Paul Scully said “The taxiing of Rolls-Royce’s ‘Spirit of Innovation’ forms part of an exciting new chapter in aviation as we move towards its first flight in the spring. Set to be the world’s fastest electric plane, this pioneering aircraft highlights the value of close collaboration between industry and government.
I hope the UK will be the masters of battery technology and it is looking good
 
Well done Alexander Dennis, winning a contract for Hong Kong's Kowloon Bus Company.

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Could that have happened if we were in the EU?
Genuine question
 
Could that have happened if we were in the EU?
Genuine question
Why not? UK was exporting more outside the EU than in before it left.

Our local refuse contractor is replacing all of its bin trucks with Dennis vehicles. Started when they got the contract in 2018 on a rolling program. Regularly see a brand new Dennis on the roads here on the NSW Central Coast.
 

Yokel

LE
Well done Alexander Dennis, winning a contract for Hong Kong's Kowloon Bus Company.

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I missed the word reshoring.

Evidence of reshoring grows

With a Brexit deal finalised at the end of 2020 and the COVID-19 vaccination rollout programme well underway, manufacturers expect 2021 to be a better year. But global shocks are not going away. As Will Stirling reports, organisations are uniting to show companies which source parts from abroad that there are alternative UK suppliers who can offer short lead-times, high quality, proximity and ease of doing business.

In early January, British bus maker Alexander Dennis (ADL) announced it will manufacture the chassis for both its BYD ADL branded single- and double-deck electric buses in the UK. Previously, the chassis were made in parent company BYD’s factories in Hungary and China and shipped to the UK for assembly, with the change ensuring that complete vehicles will be made in Britain. Both countries are known for having lower production costs than the UK.

It is the latest strong example of ‘reshoring’, or companies moving production of a key component to the UK from abroad or, in some cases, relocating whole factories to the UK. The reshoring trend, which was established long before the coronavirus pandemic, has several logical reasons behind it, but the two most important today are probably Brexit and COVID-19 and the supply chain disruption that both cause.

Shorter supply chains in the UK means faster parts delivery and therefore faster customer deliveries, often better quality, as well as quicker, native communication with the supplier, who can be visited in hours or minutes. There is also rising public popularity in ‘Made in Britain’, with a rise of devoted groups, brands and Twitter accounts championing local makers, and a tangible public sense of support for local companies during an incredibly tough 2020 for business.

While the notion of bringing manufacturing home is supported by many, it is challenging in practice. A big barrier to many firms, says Julia Moore, CEO of the Gauge and Toolmakers Association (GTMA), is the lack of visibility of alternative, UK-based suppliers of the components they need: “Purchasing managers are often given a list of suppliers to procure from, many of which are overseas, and tasked with negotiating the price,” she explains. “They just don’t know that a UK supplier of that component exists and, if they did know, might assume that the product will be more expensive.”
 

Yokel

LE
Response to the 2021 Budget - James Worthington, Managing Director, My Workwear

It was with relief that we witnessed a budget today focused on growth, productivity, and innovation that will enable the UK to recover following the pandemic, rather than increased taxing and pressure on individuals and small businesses who are struggling to survive after what has been such a tough year for us all.

With SME’s as the backbone of the British economy, it’s positive to see that the Chancellor had this at the centre of his announcements. A large proportion of our customers are SME’s, so as a business, we are hopeful that these measures will increase our customer’s buying confidence and help to stimulate the economy.

The continuation of the VAT reduction and business rate holiday will give our customers some well-needed breathing space whilst they recover and get back to business as usual. Plus the longer-term confirmation that corporation tax will not be increased for smaller businesses, will enable SMEs to plan for the future with some comfort that they won’t suddenly be hit with higher taxes.

On the downside, for corporations that make more than £250,000 profit, the 25% corporation tax is a significant blow and my worry is when you combine this with what has gone on with Brexit, large foreign businesses just won’t find the UK appealing anymore for investment. Also, just as alarming, if you dig a little deeper, the corporation tax will actually start to increase from profits over £50,000 and they are planning to taper this up from 19% to the maximum 25% when you hit the £250,000 threshold.

As a business, we have invested heavily over recent years and are planning to continue this model, so we were pleased to see news about the super deduction for investment in things like plant & machinery.

With Mr Sunak forecasting a 10% increase in investment as a result, we hope this tax benefit will encourage others to also take this opportunity to invest in a brighter future for UK business.

We were particularly interested to see the announcement regarding the digital help to grow scheme. During 2020, we saw a major move to online purchasing. With our own in-house technical team, we are lucky to have the skills that enabled us to take advantage of this move to online purchasing. However, other SMEs are not so lucky. The opportunity to get the right skills into these businesses will allow them to move forward more effectively in the new world.

Finally, as a strong supporter and advocate for the future of manufacturing in the UK, all the measures announced to support apprentices and the Kickstarter programme has come as welcome new
s. These combined with the extension of the Furlough scheme will give businesses the confidence, that we can get through this very challenging period.
 
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Well done Sunderland.


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Not the same Nissan that basically ordered it's employees to vote remain?
 
 
More investment, this time Budweiser.

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That’s nice. AbinBev (or whatever they spell it these days) own mega brands and have inherited large plants in both places mentioned. As we drink from home, they further dominate the take home market and consolidate their business.
All good news for the mega brewers (and the guys and girls who work in beer factories).
 
Well done Alexander Dennis, winning a contract for Hong Kong's Kowloon Bus Company.

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Apparently Wrights were supplying KMB before their issues. I wonder is this instead of or in addition to?
 
I took it to be Starstreak. There's a pic this morning with Brandon Lewis SOS NI at Thales Belfast beside a Stormer with what looks like a Starstreak setup on top.
 

Yokel

LE
More NE investment, this time Hitachi.

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I though that BREXIT was supposed to be the end for all UK manufacturing and inward investment? No more investment in British plants by multinationals, we were told.

Anyway - Siemens are also making new trains,

Fifty per cent of the new train fleet will be built in Goole, East Yorkshire, employing up to 700 people in engineering and manufacturing roles, 250 in the construction phase and 1,700 in the broader supply chain. Last month Siemens Mobility announced £50m of related contracts for UK suppliers, including a number for train components. These included almost £6m in contracts for Yorkshire-based LPA Lighting to provide the interior train lighting, and Midlands-based suppliers Baker Bellfield to supply cab partition wall and I M Kelly for driver seat footrests.
 
I though that BREXIT was supposed to be the end for all UK manufacturing and inward investment? No more investment in British plants by multinationals, we were told.

Anyway - Siemens are also making new trains,

Fifty per cent of the new train fleet will be built in Goole, East Yorkshire, employing up to 700 people in engineering and manufacturing roles, 250 in the construction phase and 1,700 in the broader supply chain. Last month Siemens Mobility announced £50m of related contracts for UK suppliers, including a number for train components. These included almost £6m in contracts for Yorkshire-based LPA Lighting to provide the interior train lighting, and Midlands-based suppliers Baker Bellfield to supply cab partition wall and I M Kelly for driver seat footrests.
IIRC Brexit is & was, to the minority the apocalypse...

Oh well, onwards & upwards.[emoji4]

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