Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Manufacturing in the UK

Yokel

LE
British Hovercraft builder delivers new 995EDs

The deals have seen two eight-metre-long 995EDs made for the Hong Kong Marine Police and one for Estonian Border Guard. In total seven 995ED hovercraft have been built and sold since the model was unveiled at the ExpoNaval trade fair in Chile in 2018 with clients ranging from the Malaysia Marine Department to private customers. The 995ED entry price is around £650,000 with plenty of options, and the craft has capacity for eight people or up to four stretchers or any combination up to a maximum payload of just under a tonne making it suitable for a variety of roles. Top speed is 30 knots at full ‘all up weight’.


and

Mr MacLeod-Ash said Griffon is seeing a recovery in the exports market with a good order-book and demand across Griffon’s range from large to smaller hovercraft together with the support services and consultancy the company offers.

Overseas clients are coming to Griffon for quality,” he said.
 

Yokel

LE
UK Manufacturing, The Facts 2020 - 21

The UK retained its position as the ninth leading manufacturer and tenth in terms of global exports with output totalling £191bn in 2019 – a growth of 7% over the last five years. The data also reveals that among the 2.7 million people employed by UK manufacturers, the average salary stands at £34,538 – 13% higher than the average UK salary.

The North West remains the single biggest region in terms of output, London and the South East combined are now significantly the largest, worth some £30.7bn. This is down to the heavy concentration of electronics – worth £4.7bn alone - in the South East which was already benefitting from the drive towards digital technologies and automation, a trend which the pandemic is likely to have accelerated.

The data, captured before the Coronavirus outbreak shows that goods exports (53%) outweighed that of services (47%) while the sector continues to punch above its weight contributing 66% of total UK spend on R&D and 16% of business investment.
 

Yokel

LE
There is some good news. In Northern Ireland Wightbus are to create new jobs:

The manufacturer is planning to increase production of its zero-emission hydrogen buses.

CEO Jo Bamford said there was interest from around the world for the double decker vehicles.

The company will launch a recruitment drive later this year to fill the positions, 19 of which will be apprenticeships.

The 46 roles include spray painters, welders, electrical engineers, technicians, accountants, sales staff and a project manager.
 
There is some good news. In Northern Ireland Wightbus are to create new jobs:

The manufacturer is planning to increase production of its zero-emission hydrogen buses.

CEO Jo Bamford said there was interest from around the world for the double decker vehicles.

The company will launch a recruitment drive later this year to fill the positions, 19 of which will be apprenticeships.

The 46 roles include spray painters, welders, electrical engineers, technicians, accountants, sales staff and a project manager.

It sounds like they may be reopening a line. AIUI at the time of the crisis there were four. I don't know what they currently have open but I have been sharing some of the jobs they have posting upthread.
 

Ayatollah

Old-Salt
The booklet that Rolls Royce produced about the proposed Small Modular Reactor talked of advantages for the UK deterrent programme. At least it would stop them seeking employment with EDF and having to go to China.

The booklet also talked of exports - are they looking to export the SMR or just components and equipment?
Rolls Royce is owned by BMW, so does it really matter whether its parts or the whole machine, China also makes BMW.
 

Yokel

LE
Rolls Royce is owned by BMW, so does it really matter whether its parts or the whole machine, China also makes BMW.

No no no no no!

BMW own Rolls Royce Motors Ltd, who were separated from Rolls Royce PLC back on the seventies. The defence aerospace, civil aerospace, marine, power generation, and nuclear activities of RR PLC were and are considered to me of national importance.
 

Ayatollah

Old-Salt
No no no no no!

BMW own Rolls Royce Motors Ltd, who were separated from Rolls Royce PLC back on the seventies. The defence aerospace, civil aerospace, marine, power generation, and nuclear activities of RR PLC were and are considered to me of national importance.
Confusing.
From Wiki,
A wholly-owned subsidiary of the German group BMW, it was established in 1998 after BMW was licensed the rights to the Rolls-Royce brand name and logo from Rolls-Royce plc and acquired the rights to the Spirit of Ecstasy and Rolls-Royce grill shape trademarks from Volkswagen AG.
 

Yokel

LE
If there were significant links between Rolls Royce PLC and the People's Republic of China do you really think the US Department of Defense would allow them to be deeply involved in sensitive projects? I am thinking of marine gas turbines used in some American warships as well as the LiftSystem for the F-35B Lightning.
 
Confusing.
From Wiki,
A wholly-owned subsidiary of the German group BMW, it was established in 1998 after BMW was licensed the rights to the Rolls-Royce brand name and logo from Rolls-Royce plc and acquired the rights to the Spirit of Ecstasy and Rolls-Royce grill shape trademarks from Volkswagen AG.
There’s nothing confusing; Rolls-Royce PLC is a publicly limited company tron the FTSE100 and registered in the UK.

Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd is a private limited company registered on wholly owned by BMW.

RR Motors was split from what is now Rolls-Royce PLC when the company went bust. At the time, Rolls-Royce Motors also owned Bentley. For years is was owned by Vickers, but when sold, it was split so Volkswagen got Bentley and BMW got Rolls. It was a bit more complicated than that, which is why BMW had to acquire the Spirit form VW.

BMW does not own the rights to the use the Rolls-Royce brand or the RR logo. It licenses them from Rolls-Royce PLC. As did Vickers when they owned RR Motors
 
There’s nothing confusing; Rolls-Royce PLC is a publicly limited company tron the FTSE100 and registered in the UK.

Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd is a private limited company registered on wholly owned by BMW.

RR Motors was split from what is now Rolls-Royce PLC when the company went bust. At the time, Rolls-Royce Motors also owned Bentley. For years is was owned by Vickers, but when sold, it was split so Volkswagen got Bentley and BMW got Rolls. It was a bit more complicated than that, which is why BMW had to acquire the Spirit form VW.

BMW does not own the rights to the use the Rolls-Royce brand or the RR logo. It licenses them from Rolls-Royce PLC. As did Vickers when they owned RR Motors
No, nothing confusing there at all :-D
 

Nornironman

Old-Salt
One in a depressing list of companies that have been impacted. Honda, Ford, Airbus, JLR's 4500 jobs, Panasonic, Phillips.... the trend is not good.

I spoke to a not insignificant customer of ours yesterday (£1.6m) who in light of paperwork and VAT issues will look to source the more marginal product locally within the EU. I's not a huge impact but it's the first as yet I've felt personally. I've suppliers being asses, but I can deal with that.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
One in a depressing list of companies that have been impacted. Honda, Ford, Airbus, JLR's 4500 jobs, Panasonic, Phillips.... the trend is not good.

I spoke to a not insignificant customer of ours yesterday (£1.6m) who in light of paperwork and VAT issues will look to source the more marginal product locally within the EU. I's not a huge impact but it's the first as yet I've felt personally. I've suppliers being asses, but I can deal with that.
This afternoon when BBC interviewed a grown-up from Nissan UK (probably Mamoru Aoki third edit: he was Indian as I'd suspected, Ashwani Gupta, CEO), he stated that in light of the electrification of cars and Nissan seeing the UK as perfect for building the batteries, Sunderland is the perfect place, and he couldn't see other motor manufacturers not onboarding battery production in the UK.
 
Last edited:
This afternoon when BBC interviewed a grown-up from Nissan UK (probably Mamoru Aoki), he stated that in light of the electrification of cars and Nissan seeing the UK as perfect for building the batteries, Sunderland is the perfect place, and he couldn't see other motor manufacturers not onboarding battery production in the UK.
JLR has a battery assembly plant in the UK.

RP.
 
Originally published by: Felix Page, Autocar magazine, on 19 January 2021.

Explainer: What the Brexit deal means for car manufacturers.

We analyse how the UK car industry will be affected by the post-Brexit agreement.
Deal or no deal, there were always going to be obstacles to post-Brexit trade. Here’s what the agreement should mean for the automotive sector.


Bureaucracy . . . .

Jubilation at the trade deal was tempered by scepticism at prime minister Boris Johnson’s assertion that UK industry would face “no non-tariff barriers” when trading with the EU. The new agreement will result in increased paperwork, processes and border checks, with some estimates suggesting an extra cost to the UK economy of £15 billion in customs declarations alone.

Felipe Munoz of industry body Jato Dynamics said: “Costs are likely to grow due to longer processes and more authorisations involved,” which will “complicate things for the OEMs producing locally, and those exporting to Europe.”

With modern factories operating according to a ‘just-in-time’ supply model, any delay at the border could prompt the temporary shutdown of individual lines or even entire factories, as we have already seen at Honda’s Swindon plant on two occasions, in December and January.

Tariffs and quotas . . . .

In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the UK would have traded with the EU as a “most preferred nation” under World Trade Organization rules so would have incurred tariffs of 10% on cars and 2-4% on their individual components, amounting to an estimated £2800 premium on an EU-built car for UK buyers. Under the terms of the deal now agreed, tariffs are imposed only on products that fail to meet ‘rule of origin’ requirements and no quotas have been imposed.

SMMT boss Mike Hawes said: “It’s no substitute to the benefits that we enjoyed under the EU, but the agreement does provide some hope and a platform, limiting some of the damage.” To avoid incurring tariffs on future electric cars built domestically and exported to the EU, the UK will need to drastically ramp up its battery production capacity to meet those requirements.

Supply chain . . . .

In a normal year, an estimated £13bn worth of automotive parts crosses the Channel, but the ‘rules of origin’ that were instrumental in securing tariff-free trade in new cars could make that figure shift.
Professor David Bailey of the Birmingham Business School said it was “good news in that there is full bilateral cumulation, allowing UK and EU parts to count towards local content rules”. He suggested the agreement “will be enough for most car makers in the UK to avoid tariffs”, despite the UK’s failure to attain a ‘diagonal cumulation’ with countries including Japan, Turkey and China.

Crucially, the trade deal allows for a 12-month grace period for manufacturers to produce evidence of the origin of their products – “a major win” for the industry, according to Hawes. He added: “Some members were disappointed at the lack of diagonal accumulation on content with Japan, Korea and so forth. That would have been a really big ask of the UK, so I don’t think there was surprise it wasn’t in there.”

But with 30,000 individual components used in the construction of the average car, proving the origin of each was a recipe for chaos. Government guidance states that, under the terms of the deal, “once a product has gained originating status, it is considered 100% originating”, meaning an engine comprising 30% EU-derived components, if used in the production of a UK-built car, would count as 100% locally assembled.

Investment . . . .

The deal will come as reassurance for foreign brands with significant manufacturing presence in the UK. Nissan COO Ashwani Gupta previously said the company’s UK operations would “not be sustainable” if tariffs were imposed. Munoz is confident the UK will now still play a role on the global stage. “The UK is one of the world’s top 10 biggest markets by volume. The fact that it is no longer part of Europe [the EU] doesn’t mean that local consumers won’t buy cars any more,” he said. “If you have cases where OEMs open factories in specific markets to supply internal demand, then I don’t see why the UK can’t continue getting investment.”

Honda’s Swindon plant was already earmarked to close in July 2021, with Brexit NOT a key factor in the decision. However, BMW and Nissan have both previously suggested that they could move plants post-Brexit. It will take time for the minutiae of the deal to become clear before they determine their long-term plans, though.

1611502416844.png
How long will Brexit blight the car industry?


Posted on: the "brexit-consequences-thread", and also this "manufacturing-in-the-uk" thread.
 

Yokel

LE
As requested by @Yokel


Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

I see the company makes unmanned ground vehicles for load carrying - are these of any interest to commercial users?

In other news - Norton Motorcycles has been saved. They are recruiting too - proper engineering roles. If British industry had paid the same attention to Quality in the fifties/sixties/seventies....
 
Bombardier have been given £1.7bn of backing by UK Export Finance to build two monorails in Egypt - the first trains to be supplied to a foreign customer for 12 years.

Great to see UKEF providing a line of credit to such a huge export order. More please; this is exactly how Government should be supporting industry.
 

Latest Threads

Top