Man who saved 13year old from falling to death is hounded

#1
From the BBC, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/7183017.stm


BBC said:
Cliff hero resigns in safety row

Paul Waugh has been a volunteer coastguard for 13 years
A volunteer coastguard who was nominated for an award for rescuing a schoolgirl from a cliff has resigned after a row over health and safety.
Paul Waugh climbed down to Faye Harrison, 13, who was hanging on by her fingertips and about to fall 200ft (60m) at Salburn-on-Sea, Teesside.

He did not wear safety equipment as it would have taken time to go back to his vehicle which was some distance away.

Mr Waugh was later told that he had broken rules.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) said it was not looking for dead heroes.

When you see a little frightened face looking up at you, all you want to do is help

Paul Waugh

The Skinningrove Coastguard Cliff Rescue Team was called out, along with the emergency services in January 2007, after three girls became trapped by rising tides.

Faye attempted to climb up the cliffs, but when a ledge gave way she was left hanging on to tufts of grass for 45 minutes.

Mr Waugh was one of three team members who arrived at the scene on foot, as their vehicle was trapped behind locked gates a field away.

They left safety equipment in the vehicle because they wanted to reach the scene as quickly as possible.

The 44-year-old from Skelton Green climbed down and held on to her for 30 minutes until she could be winched to safety.

'Guardian angel'

He said: "I understand I broke a rule, but I felt it was a matter of having to because she only had minutes to live. She said that herself, she was planning her own funeral.

"When you see a little frightened face looking up at you, all you want to do is help.

"There's no way I'm going to stand back and watch a 13-year-old girl fall off a cliff."

Faye later nominated him for a life saver award as her "guardian angel".

However, Mr Waugh, who has been with the MCA for 13 years, was later told that the organisation had carried out an internal investigation into the team's handling of the incident.

He said: "I'm leaving now due to the hassle I've had over the last nine months. In fact, I've been depressed over it.

"Yes, fair enough, I broke a rule, but when I started my training a long time ago, I was told, one time, you'll work outside the box. And in this case I had to help her, she was ready to fall.

He added: "I'm very, very sad. It's a shame I'm having to go."

'Minimise risk'

The MCA said in a statement that it had not received an official notification from him, but was very grateful for his past activities and wished him well in the future.

The statement said: "Our responsibility is to maintain the health and welfare of those who we sometimes ask to go out in difficult and challenging conditions to effect rescues.

"As such we ask our volunteers to risk assess the situations they and the injured or distressed person find themselves in, and to ensure that whatever action they take does not put anyone in further danger.

"We are proud of our safety record and we will seek to maintain the safety of our volunteers, and minimise risk in what can be inherently difficult situations."
Personally i feel that whilst there is a point for a reprimand following a bending of the rules, he should have been commended for his selfless (Heroic) actions, not hounded by H+S staff to the point of depression and eventually leaving his job.
 
#2
M&CA said:
The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) said it was not looking for dead heroes.
The bloke looked pretty alive to me!

Not to worry he can always go and join the GMP as a PCSO.


Dohhhh! Of course they also prefer their staff to stand by as cowards and watch kids die in need of adult assistance.

CYA H+S Nazis gone mad :evil:
 
#3
ALREADYJACKEDGENIUS said:
Dohhhh! Of course they also prefer their staff to stand by as cowards and watch kids die in need of adult assistance.

Exactly. How could you have it on your conscience to know that after you had assesed the situation, instead of getting down to that girl you spent 10minutes going back to the car and a further amount of time setting up the safety gear, only to find that the little girl isn't holding on to the outcrop by the time to get back?
 
#5
So what are rules and guidelnes there for?

It is so that you think before you break them.

Which is why those plastic coppers didn't go into the water, they are not able to think.
 
#6
Compare that situation to this one here Malcom Russell/John Warwick HEMS water rescue

the important part is this
In the event, paramedic John Warwick grabbed onto doctor Malcolm Russell, who balanced on one knee on the skid, reached down and grabbed Munden by the scruff of his clothes and yanked him out.

Said McGill: “It was a good bit of precision flying from Captain John Salt to hover-taxi into the middle and an excellent show of teamwork to rescue the child.
I am not aware of any follow up from H&S. Yes there was a risk to the rescuers and we are all aware of the rule 'Don't become a casualty yourself', but you take the risk(s) into consideration and carry out the actions you feel necessary.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Bl00dy insane H&S rules, and the cretins that enforce them. The bloke should be given a medal by the Queen for selfless actions in which he risked his own life to save another. I'd love to see these H&S pr1cks have a go at people like Pte Beharry.

I'm sorry son, I know you are injured, but have you done a risk assessment and filled out your hot works permit, becuase if not, and you go and save your oppos, you may be reprimanded.
 
#8
FFS, the man should be commended and rewarded for saving a life. Is this paper pushing mentality will be the death of our country.
 
#10
Of course, if the guy had slipped, fallen and died it would have been in 'the best tradition of the MCA'. Guys a total hero in my eyes.
I'm too angry to think straight with fcukwit HSE rules which mean buggrall when theres a split second decision to take.
Paul Waugh should have been given a medal. :pissedoff:
 
#11
BBC said:
Mr Waugh was one of three team members who arrived at the scene on foot, as their vehicle was trapped behind locked gates a field away.
I do hope that they have issued bolt cutters to each vehicle.

msr
 
#12
Im sorry but if he hasnt checked and double checked his equipment serial numbers, done his before use checks and signed the log cards then he should be severely punished. Obviously he never took into account the wind direction or stuck to the paths which could cause damage to the enviroment and countryside.

On the other hand he SAVED SOMEONES FCUKING LIFE. Its about time some of these pen pushers who write H&S moved back and live on this planet :x
 
#13
I cant help thinking about the Penlee lifeboat (Soloman Browne) tragedy back in the 80's. The Cox and crew understood the risks that they had accepted in taking the job on and chose to 'have one last go' to get the last few crewmen off the stricken vessel. As we know, some astonishingly brave men lost their lives that night, and they are rightly remembered as such.
What would be the situation today if it were to happen again?
1) lifeboat not launched to to excessive risk- lifeboat crews lives saved by H&S.
2) lifeboat launched, some ships company rescued, Cox charged and sacked for breach of H&S.
Thoughts?

Edited to correct embarassing historical error
 
#14
My Ghast is flabbered.

The coastguard. A hardy bunch of mostly volunteer lifesavers. This boy does this - for no reward remember - and is hounded for it.

Unbelievable.

Lets see if we can map this across to - lets say - the RNLI.

*Ring Ring*

Hello?

Quick!!! The Saucy Sue is in trouble and sinking!! We need someone to go out and rescue the crew!!!

Sorry fella. H and S say that if the waves are over 18 inches high we can't go. They obviously didn't do their risk assessment.

But...?

More than my jobs worth mate. ta ra.

*Click Brrrrrrrr*

Twonks. We are dying by degrees.
 
#15
Thank fuck this mentality hasn't yet reached the Army:

"Seeing the mine-strike from the top of the ridge, Corporal Mark Wright gathered a number of men and rushed down the slope to assist. Realising that the casualty was likely to die before a full mine clearance could be effected, Corporal Wright unhesitatingly led his men into the minefield.

"Exercising effective and decisive command, he directed medical orderlies to the injured soldier, ordered all unnecessary personnel to safety, and then began organising the casualty evacuation."Shortly afterwards a helicopter landed nearby, but as Corporal Wright stood up he initiated a third mine, which seriously injured him and one of the orderlies. The remaining medical orderly began treating Corporal Wright, but was himself wounded by another mine blast which caused further injury to both Corporal Wright and others.

"There were now seven casualties still in the minefield, three of whom had lost limbs.

"Despite this horrific situation and the serious injuries he had himself sustained, Corporal Wright continued to command and control the incident. He remained conscious for the majority of the time, continually shouting encouragement to those around him, maintaining morale and calm amongst the many wounded men. Sadly, Corporal Wright died of his wounds on the rescue helicopter."

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said it was not looking for dead heroes.

"His supreme courage and outstanding leadership were an inspiration to his men, however our responsibility is to maintain the health and welfare of those who we sometimes ask to go out in difficult and challenging conditions to effect rescues.

"As such we ask our volunteers to risk assess the situations they and the injured or distressed person find themselves in, and to ensure that whatever action they take does not put anyone in further danger.

"We are proud of our safety record and we will seek to maintain the safety of our volunteers, and minimise risk in what can be inherently difficult situations."
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#16
#17
A not dissimilar case and Charles Wilcox gets a well deserved George Cross. Times have changedÂ…

Charles Wilcox, who died on Tuesday aged 86, won the George Cross for helping to rescue a man who had become trapped high up on a building in Birmingham.

On August 23 1949 Wilcox, a 30-year-old painter employed by Birmingham Corporation, was engaged with other workmen in painting a council house building in the centre of the city. One of his workmates, Alfred Burrows, aged 21, mounted a ladder to begin painting an outside window on the third floor.

When he reached the top of the ladder, about 45 ft above the street, he climbed on to an arched sill, about 18 in wide, sited below the window. He then discovered that the window was bricked up on the inside, and that there was nothing he could catch hold of to keep his balance.

He turned around to go back to the ladder, but was unable to see it. Becoming frightened, he crouched down, trying to keep his balance on the narrow ledge.

The foreman painter, seeing Burrows's predicament, sent another painter to his assistance.

This man, after supporting Burrows for a few minutes, returned to the ground. Charles Wilcox then climbed the ladder and, by kneeling on a flat piece of masonry some 18 inches square at the end of the arch, was able to support Burrows, who was by now suffering from severe shock.

Wilcox remained in this position for 45 minutes until the Fire Brigade arrived; they strapped Burrows, who was by now unconscious, into a safety harness. A fireman then brought him to the ground.

Wilcox was originally awarded the Edward Medal, but this was later translated to the George Cross, in 1971. He was invested with the GC by the Queen at Buckingham Palace on March 20 1973.

The citation for his award declared: "During the period that Mr Wilcox was on the ledge with Burrows, he was in considerable danger of falling, had the other man kicked out or made any violent movement."
Telegraph 06/04/2006
 
#18
Shoot_to_Kill said:
Of course, if the guy had slipped, fallen and died it would have been in 'the best tradition of the MCA'. Guys a total hero in my eyes.
I'm too angry to think straight with fcukwit HSE rules which mean buggrall when theres a split second decision to take.
Paul Waugh should have been given a medal. :pissedoff:
Nothing to do with the HSE.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#19
drain_sniffer said:
Shoot_to_Kill said:
Of course, if the guy had slipped, fallen and died it would have been in 'the best tradition of the MCA'. Guys a total hero in my eyes.
I'm too angry to think straight with fcukwit HSE rules which mean buggrall when theres a split second decision to take.
Paul Waugh should have been given a medal. :pissedoff:
Nothing to do with the HSE.
Its fear of the HSE and the spirit of cowardliness which it breads which causes people to abandon common sense. So yes it has a lot to do with the HSE!
 
#20
Lets flip the situation around.

Lets say he sticks to health and safety rules, the girl falls and dies. He'd be villainised in the press and would the MCA be so chirpy about how they thought his actions were bleedin marvellous? (with all the uproar that would come from the family etc). I'll answer that, would they fark.

THIS springs to mind.
 

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