Man cleared of murdering teenager in knife attack

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by Screw_The_Nut, May 2, 2012.

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  1. I've just heard of this case, and the verdict seems a bit dodgy:

    Haslingden man cleared of murdering teenager in knife attack (From Lancashire Telegraph)



    So how do you stab someone 12 times in self defence? And secondly, how do you kill someone, and avoid the sentence of manslaughter? Seems a strange decision by the jury, will this be the end of the matter, or do the victim's family have other avenues?
     
  2. So the guy got punched in the face, ran away, came back, got a knife, and stabbed the other guy, 12 times.... in self defence?

    What a load of shit.
     
  3. A previous jury in the case were discharged too. Most odd.
     
  4. TheIronDuke

    TheIronDuke LE Book Reviewer

    Eh? The way I understand it, if you grab something when you are getting battered and you use it there is a fair chance to claim self defence. But if you walk off, grab something then return, that is premeditation and self defence goes out the window. A very strange verdict - even the accused's family said they thought he was going down.
     
  5. In my considered opinion (that is a theory I pulled out of my rear end), the guy (who is said to be "a bit slow") has been setup and taken back to the house for kangaroo court/romper room in relation to the wallet.

    Went a bit too far and 'mong rage' ensued. If you've ever seen it, you'll know how messy it is.
     
  6. Very quickly.
     
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  7. Masonic connections?


    If you want to research "dodgy" verdicts have a lengthy trawl through the Old Baily records: Old Bailey Online - The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, 1674-1913 - Central Criminal Court

    It's easy to see that where ocupation is given as "Gentleman" it's most likely a Not Guilty verdict. If the accused is some sort of peasant, then it's most likely guilty. I read one such case where a "gentleman" chatrged with manslaughter actualy said, "...and so I ran him through with my sword!", verdict - not guilty.
     
  8. Very, very quickly, that is if you are completely set on the idea of them not killing you.
     
  9. In a similar manner to how one shoots oneself through the head multiple times when on guard?
     
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  10. Also goes on to say that of the 12 wounds, 4 were fatal, and would have been sufficient on their own! Hmmm....
     
  11. Be interesting to see if the CPS appeal the verdict. They must have thought there was a "reasonable prospect of a conviction" to even bring it to trial in the first place.
     
  12. What I think you'll find is that the best court reporters in Britain are not currently working for the Lancashire Telegraph
     
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  13. An 'improvised weapon' used in self defence used in a manner which could be argued that the 'defender' was unable to fathom intent, malice or comprehend a degree of forethought will not allow for criminal liability to arise. As such, if the jury cannot be sure if D intended to, or was reckless to, the consequences of his actions they will not be able to satify the mens rea required for an offence to have taken place. But yes, 'tis odd that 12 wounds and no guilt whatsoever.

    Self defence (strikes in retalitation to an attack): Once, justified; twice, justified; thrice, accepted; fourth, arguable; fifth, negotiable; sixth, questionable; seventh or more, unlikely to satisfy the requirements for self defence. But the law will always create new precedents.
     
  14. Mr_Fingerz

    Mr_Fingerz LE Book Reviewer

    And if it's true that a previous jury were discharged then the inference is that the jury has been tampered with.

    Caveat: there may well have been legitimate reasons, other than attempted tampering, for the jury to be discharged. But at first glance this does seem inordinately suspicious.
     
  15. It's rare to see a man that takes pride in his work and who will go that extra mile to achieve perfection.
     
    • Like Like x 1