Lower than average wages for Ex-forces?

#1
How come all the jobs that have been posted on here lately have been offering wages below the industry average?

Do people think that ex-forces types are desperate for work and are they trying to take advantage? Every time someone comments that the wages offered are low, the poster responds with "Maybe some ex-squaddie down on his luck..." and tries to act like they're doing some sort of favour.

Am I being extremely cynical by assuming that they're deliberately pitching low pay scales at ex-squaddies?
 
#2
Maybe it reflects the below average skills and performance your average ex squaddie has to offer to civi street.
 
#4
Maybe it reflects the below average skills and performance your average ex squaddie has to offer to civi street.
Sorry, my anti-bite device is activated.
 
#5
Just took a job for £26K, thought i would be looking at £35k upwards, but most are offering £25-30. The higher paid, £40k upwards, are asking for experience i don't have, i meet 85% of what they want but there is always budget or finance control/experience thrown in, i don't hand on heart control budgets or finance, though i do touch on it,so i thought i would take this job and get some experience in the civvy work place then move up........................hopefully. I know i can do the job, but to be honest i have took this job as it suits at the moment. It does have scope for promotion so fingers crossed.

The job i have got is similar to what i do now, working for a company that works with the military, within easy off road cycling range of my house, free gym etc so has some perks and only a 4.5 day week.

I believe they also support you joining the TA i will now look into that as well.
 
#6
To be fair, £26k is the national average... I saw a job on here offering £14k the other day for a management position.

Takes the mickey slightly....
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#7
It's true that many employers will take 'advantage' of the fact that many ex-BIll Oddies are cushioned by a pension, but that's natural and to be expected*. Any employer will pay the least he has to - getting a better deal is usually up to you :) Go and sell yourself and your skills, get trained up as required, and gain progress and more money.



*And please, no whining about "But they shouldn't be allowed to count Service pensions" - it's just a pension.
 
#8
To be fair, £26k is the national average... I saw a job on here offering £14k the other day for a management position.

Takes the mickey slightly....
Agreed, i looked into the local average, weighed up the benfits, not least my boss is ex army and we got on straight away. Add my pension and it is all good.

I think we get carried away with the success stories and all expect the same. I have colleagues who are doing really well, area managers etc, but they didn't start off there....................and for some of th ehours and stress thay work under not sure the money is worth it.

Main issue with me is i have worked since i left school, i have had 2 weeks unemployment prior to my turning up for basic training, so i was just glad to have a job to walk into straight off.
 
#9
It's true that many employers will take 'advantage' of the fact that many ex-BIll Oddies are cushioned by a pension, but that's natural and to be expected*. Any employer will pay the least he has to - getting a better deal is usually up to you :) Go and sell yourself and your skills, get trained up as required, and gain progress and more money.



*And please, no whining about "But they shouldn't be allowed to count Service pensions" - it's just a pension.
Good point, I recently got a pay raise through nothing more than pure cheek. If people are daft enough to accept getting paid less than their industry peers - and probably less than their non-ex-service colleagues in the same role as them - then they're not using their brains.
 
#10
To be fair, £26k is the national average... I saw a job on here offering £14k the other day for a management position.

Takes the mickey slightly....
It really depends what the management position is. Some 'management' positions are little more than supervisory roles and are paid as such and are, as you would expect, at the lower end of the pay scale. Others aren't managerial jobs at all. For instance some sales positions are called 'territory managers' although all they are are one salesman covering an area, hardly a managerial post but still called one.

If all you can get is a relatively low paid job then my advice is to take it and either seek to advance yourself within the company or make yourself attractive to the opposition. When I was employed I routinely requested a pay rise after 9 months after the third tri-monthly sales figures were in. Once they could see you could do the job and had figures that would make you attractive to rivals then they bumped your money up to keep you keen. When you have a job it's far easier to get another one and employers will pay more to the right person with the right track record.
 
#11
its a UK wide situation, about 18 months ago saw an IT job that was a lot closer to home so better for me and it was £28-32k with overtine etc etc. I didn't have all the quals they needed, job was advertised again about 2 weeks ago £17-20k. A friend of mine has a masters and a shedload of IT quals, was working on a 12 month renewable contract in basingstoke, first 12 months it was £54k per annum. He went in to sort out the terms for the next 12 months and they offered him £28k. In the interview they told him take it or leave it we've already had people applying, turns out they had been recruiting in east europe and india/pakistan, where people were happy to work for that amount.
 
#12
To be fair, £26k is the national average... I saw a job on here offering £14k the other day for a management position.

Takes the mickey slightly....
I think that 26K isnt very accurate. People on very high pay raise the average.

On to your main point. If you were about to leave the army and haven't done your homework (as thousands of squaddies don't bother doing) then the offer of any wages is better than none.
Someone who has used his resettlement wisely and/or put his education costs to good use while serving probably wont be needing ARRSE to find him a job.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#13
Maybe it reflects the below average skills and performance your average ex squaddie has to offer to civi street.

I wouldn't wholly disagree with that. How many people leave each year with nothing to offer and having done no preparation for their transition? There are plenty of cases where even those who have prepared either didn't make headway or it took them longer than they had expected.
 
#15
If all you can get is a relatively low paid job then my advice is to take it and either seek to advance yourself within the company or make yourself attractive to the opposition. When I was employed I routinely requested a pay rise after 9 months after the third tri-monthly sales figures were in. Once they could see you could do the job and had figures that would make you attractive to rivals then they bumped your money up to keep you keen. When you have a job it's far easier to get another one and employers will pay more to the right person with the right track record.

Good point,

I think in UK we have a snobbery about jobs that the continentals don't seem to have.

What often used to peeve me on ARRSE was the frequent derogatory use of the term 'Shelf-stackers' (Tesco usually!) often by soldiers that, had things gone differently, would likely have been doing a similar job themselves.

In the company that I worked for, I once, against all the perceived wisdom and the opposition of our personnel dept, offered one of our security guards (not an ex-serviceman) a trainee post in IT.

Mainly because although that it was obvious that security wasn't his chosen line of work, it was clear that his attitude was that, rather than give the impression that he was he was doing was below his salt, he was going to make the best of his situation. In other words it was a case of 'Security is not my choice but while I'm here, I'm going to make the best of it'. It was obvious in the enthusiatic way he carried out his tasks.

We took him on, it was a success and he's probably doing very well financially now.

On the other hand, I took an ex-soldier out of our cables department for a similar trainee position mainly because he was ex-service and I assumed he would have the right attitude (well, we do, don't we?) but he blew it, turned out that he just had the wrong work-ethic and poor inter-personal skills so eventually we let him go with a reasonable pay-off.
 
#16
A large part of the problem is that lots of servicemen have no idea how well paid they are in relation to the skills many of them have. They seem to be under the impression that all jobs, with relatively low skill levels, are as well paid as they are.

For example check out this site and you will see skilled graduate jobs at 24k with very high entry requirements.

GCHQ Test Analyst/Specialist | CareerPlayer.com
 
#17
I moved to Australia on my trade quals, 6 months as a fitter into leading hand then workshop super inside a year. Moved to a company as a workshop manager AU$92,000 then started my own company which I ran for 2 years before being offered a job I couldn't refuse. Now on AU$154,000. Even time roster 4 days on 4 off 5 on 5 off with 20 days a year leave (which I've not touched)
VM's in the mines are on over $100,000 a year. If you have a house, or equity in one, you are set! Just need to grow some balls and make the move.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#18
I think we get carried away
Full stop. What's been said already is true in most cases. Beyond those in the techie trades, very few of us have anything to offer an employer beyond being generally loyal and having the unique ability to work well in wet coveralls. This is why the resettlement phase of your career is more important an issue than quite a few will accept. Continuing to put the extra hours in through some misguided loyalty, when you should be getting yourself ready to join the rat-race, has always been a fault with a lot of service personnel. It's appreciated that you cannot control whether you're to be deployed during that period or not, but those who burn the midnight oil when they should really be delegating work elsewhere need to change their attitudes. Be selfish and unashamedly so. You are about to be made unemployed by the very employer who you are voluntarily putting extra hours in for. You don't get paid overtime or time off in lieu and you get one shot at resettlement. Once you're out that door you re replaced the same day. There's being loyal and then there's being plain daft.

We've all been advised to start our resettlement 2 years in advance but how many of us actually do just that? How many 'managers' in the Army would accept you doing that? There are always excuses, and from both sides, as to why you can put your resettlement off until a later date. My advice, work out what it is that you want to do outside, realise that the Army is just a job and that you will have to leave, and work towards your new career goal. You are on your own out here. You can make that transition as easy or as difficult as you want. As for wages, if you can score a job out here with a salary of over £25k, you're doing OK. Your mate may have landed one with a wage of over £40k, good luck to him, but that doesn't happen for the majority of us. What you have to bear in mind is that the £25k that you are being offered is your starting wage. With a pension on top of that, your income will be quite respectable. You will move on from that £25k wage as you develop the necessary experience which you need to do so, either with the same employer or another. Once you are in a job, it's easier to find others. It's not so easy moving from unemployment to a job, as you are competing with scores of others who will most likely have the skill set which you lack, so don't turn your nose up at a job offering only £25k. It is simply a case of take it or leave it. Very few will value what you have and even fewer will be prepared to negotiate from the outset, especially when they can pick and choose.
 
#19
To be fair, £26k is the national average... I saw a job on here offering £14k the other day for a management position.

Takes the mickey slightly....
You are kidding........ I was on that in the Uk 25 years ago. That is lower than 16 year old apprenticeship wages here in Australia.
 
#20
You are kidding........ I was on that in the Uk 25 years ago. That is lower than 16 year old apprenticeship wages here in Australia.

Let's not get into a UK v Australia thing.

There are some very good points made about management of expectations. There are some with technical skills that are transferable that can make decent money outside. I'm fortunate enough to be one of them. There are many others though that got used to the Tax Free car/ decent wage that the Army provides and are in for a shock when they leave and realise that their skills aren't as transferable as they thought. It's a wake up call for some.

Back to Aus, and I recall the wages out there being none too clever when I did Long Look. The cost of living was lower though.
And for **** sake if you come back with a point, don't mention the ******* weather.
 

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top