Low flying

#1
I live in a nice quiet part of Scotland. Quiet except for flaming low-flying driver airframes. Contact with their base gets answer that constant training is necessary. Can those with recent front-line experience confirm this please? From what I recall of Gulf Wars 1 & 2, the destruction of enemy air defence was done from long range/high altitude and any low level flying that might have taken place was superflous. I'm talking about high speed aircraft not heli etc. Also seem to recall that in GW1, low flying was banned by Yanks as counter-productive.
 
#5
Biscuits_AB said:
Do they keep you awake at night?
Night time flying is rare and double glazing works well. Problem is one will be walking - dead quiet except few feathered birds and suddenly there is a great noise and - quite often - the damned thing is in valley below me. Takes time to get back to that 'walking in sleep' mode!
 
#6
Some people don't know a business opportunity when they see one. Just invite some of those beardy-weirdy planespotters to sit in your garden and watch the RAF's finest (both aircraft) zooming about the beautiful Caledonian vista whilst a charming retired monkey brings them tea and cakes. They won't get done for spying like they would in Greece and you could charge them a few quid too.

Great advice, free, gratis and for nothing.

V!
 
#7
OldRedCap said:
I live in a nice quiet part of Scotland. Quiet except for flaming low-flying driver airframes. Contact with their base gets answer that constant training is necessary. Can those with recent front-line experience confirm this please? From what I recall of Gulf Wars 1 & 2, the destruction of enemy air defence was done from long range/high altitude and any low level flying that might have taken place was superflous. I'm talking about high speed aircraft not heli etc. Also seem to recall that in GW1, low flying was banned by Yanks as counter-productive.
During GW1 most RAF sorties were flown at low or medium level, in particular the Tornado missions dropping JP233 airfield denial weapons, a risky procedure which cost the lives of some aircrew and resulted in some being shot down and captured. Whatever the altitude from which munitions are delivered, a/c often transit to target at low level as they are much harder for enemy (and Patriot, presumably) to detect, so low-flying is most certainly not superfluous.

It was the Americans who generally operated at high altitude. If they banned their pilots from low flying, it was probably because of incidents like this: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/53565.stm , and because they lost too many a/c and pilots to accidents.

I live on a fast-jet base and whilst the aircrew can be a bunch of arrses at times, their skill and commitment is not in doubt; the training is incredibly difficult and the standard required unremitting. This standard is only achieved through constant training in all aspects of what they do. The RAF's safety record is second to none; to consider risking it because of people whinging about noise would be absurd. However, low flying is rigidly controlled and it can only happen when specifically authorised and in specific areas which are rotated to minimise disruption.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

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#9
OldRedCap said:
Biscuits_AB said:
Do they keep you awake at night?
Night time flying is rare and double glazing works well. Problem is one will be walking - dead quiet except few feathered birds and suddenly there is a great noise and - quite often - the damned thing is in valley below me. Takes time to get back to that 'walking in sleep' mode!
If I were you, I would only be concerned when they started a bombing run on your gaff.

Why don't you paint in large white letters on your roof 'KEEP THE NOISE DOWN YOU CRAB C*NTS'.

It could work one of two ways for you :lol:
 
#10
Biscuits_AB said:
OldRedCap said:
Biscuits_AB said:
Do they keep you awake at night?
Night time flying is rare and double glazing works well. Problem is one will be walking - dead quiet except few feathered birds and suddenly there is a great noise and - quite often - the damned thing is in valley below me. Takes time to get back to that 'walking in sleep' mode!
If I were you, I would only be concerned when they started a bombing run on your gaff.

Why don't you paint in large white letters on your roof 'KEEP THE NOISE DOWN YOU CRAB C*NTS'.

It could work one of two ways for you :lol:
didn't a welsh farmer try that a few years back and it back fired on him as it proved to be of interest to the NATO aircrews on exercise there at the time?
 
#11
Old Red Cap

My cousin Shamir, in the artillery souk can let you have a pre-owned ZSU 23x4 at a very reasonable price, including shipping.

For a special price he will even take the guns off it. I am told that once painted by the Target Aquisition radar, those anti-social youths will keep well away from your valley.

Alternatively, you might write to the Guardian that it is having an adverse effect on the local breeding fox population and the infants of local, single, teenage, mothers?
 
#12
Take up listening or transmitting on short wave and inform the RAF that you will be operating using an antenna hanging from a kite flying at 199 ft. Of course their aircraft never come below 200 ft so it will not affect them.

They will probably mark the position on their mapping system as somewhere to avoid and someone will else will suffer!

I know that low flying training is necessary but it I have always thought there is something odd with me being liable to a fine if I drive through a nearby village at 31 mph whereas the RAF regularly fly over at 200 ft at several hundred miles an hour.

MB
 
#13
ISTR that winch operated gliders and what have you used to display a big f off cross of lorraine on the ground to warn aircraft , maybe worth a try

:p
 
#14
Blackcat,

Yes, the farmer did. His actual wording was 'P1ss off Biggles'. Sadly, he failed to realise that this made his farm a superb landmark for navigation purposes. I have no idea if it's ture, but someone once claimed that the farmer managed to treble the amount of traffic overhead as a result . ..
 
#15
OldRedCap said:
I live in a nice quiet part of Scotland. Quiet except for flaming low-flying driver airframes. Contact with their base gets answer that constant training is necessary. Can those with recent front-line experience confirm this please? From what I recall of Gulf Wars 1 & 2, the destruction of enemy air defence was done from long range/high altitude and any low level flying that might have taken place was superflous. I'm talking about high speed aircraft not heli etc. Also seem to recall that in GW1, low flying was banned by Yanks as counter-productive.
You and I both.especially at the beginning and end of the month.And as for all the Chinooks over the last 4 weeks (a real pain in the ARRSE)
 
#16
Archimedes said:
Blackcat,

Yes, the farmer did. His actual wording was 'P1ss off Biggles'. Sadly, he failed to realise that this made his farm a superb landmark for navigation purposes. I have no idea if it's ture, but someone once claimed that the farmer managed to treble the amount of traffic overhead as a result . ..
I heard that this went on for months and the "dial-a-mates" in NATO crew rooms across Europe went nuts. What would you expect when the area is filled with bored sky-gods waiting for the call from BA that have to teach sprogs (and a great many "cartographically dyslexic" Arabian princes) how to pick out a single building at 250ft and 420kts?

In my spacey days, a couple of over-enthusiastic junior instructors at the gliding school I was later to join decided, after the pubs closed on Saturday night, to white-wash a bunch of rocks and spell out the unit name in 12ft characters so students could figure out when to turn at the right point. The only problem was that this was in an officially designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the locals were a tadge miffed.

Cue one phone call from the AOC to the Boss: "Flt Lt X, Monday morning, my office- bring your hat and your own chair. (Click.)" Poor bugger had only been boss for around 3 weeks and had to travel 200 miles to explain himself.
 
#17
You and I both. especially at the beginning and end of the month. And as for all the Chinooks over the last 4 weeks (a real pain in the ARRSE)
I never knew we had so many bloody chinooks. Down here in the sunny Surrey/ London borders we've had loads of the buggers flying about going "wocca wocca." Is it their mating season or something?

V!
 
#18
polar69 said:
ISTR that winch operated gliders and what have you used to display a big f off cross of lorraine on the ground to warn aircraft , maybe worth a try
They still do, but nobody seems to pay any attention. Despite being marked on the air maps as well, I've seen aircraft (non-RAF) fly underneath a winch cable while a glider was being launched <shudders>.
 
#19
I heard the Welsh farmer made his barn a waypoint for every pilot in NATO (Fcuk off Biggles!) and said barn now features on simulators just to make sure no one misses it.

A double edged sword indeed, Blackcat.
 

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