Louisiana NG: Could the CCRF do this?

#1
The entire 7,000-strong Louisiana National Guard and 16,000 reservists from neighbouring states were mobilised to prevent looting in the Big Easy during this week's Republican National Convention. As the storm bore down on the coast, convoys of ambulances and emergency vehicles, their lights blazing, snaked along the otherwise deserted motorways.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article4651498.ece

msr
 
#2
msr said:
Louisiana NG: Could the CCRF do this?
Nice try, but that's either a wah or your calendar is seven months ahead of the rest of us.
 
#3
"Nice try, but that's either a wah or your calendar is seven months ahead of the rest of us." ?? its happening at the moment!

If we had the resources training, backup and more importantly MTds, I dont see why not
 
#5
I'm sure we could muster 40 blokes to prevent looting in worthing if it got a little damper :twisted:
to be honest if a hurricane cat 5 hits the UK we are all fucked big time :D
 
#6
No.
Military personnel within the UK have the same powers of arrest and detention as a normal civilian.
Any deployment for a MACA request but with MACP responsibilities requirements would be difficult as troops would have to go through OPTAG or equivalent (ISYN), before you even factor in weapons ROE etc etc.

Funnily enough a doorman with an SIA licence would have more solid legal ground to stand on.

Any troops on the ground would be in support of the Police (they normally have Primacy) and bring either skills that that Category 1 responders do not have (EOD/RESA) or a capability that would take too long for the civil authorities to generate.
The Military brings "Tempo" to the response phase.

CCRF may not in fact be day to day politically deployable, but it is a "reserve" if the balloon really goes up. and helps justify the TA's existance, as no one wants to totally get rid of something just in case it does save the day - however this as a reason is getting slimmer and slimmer as private security starts to move in to post Iraq markets
 
#7
To be honest all this does is highlight how bad Louisiana State Police department is under manned. They have 1022 Officers for a population of 4.5 million.

We don't have anything directly comparable but West Midlands is close with a population of 5.5 million* and a combined Police force of 13000*.

If you ask a serving Police Officer their opinion of CCRF it is we can handle it ourselves, thanks anyway.


* Sourced from wiki.
 
#9
No.

The Louisiana NG are undertaking a serious tasking.

Is CCRF anything but a smokescreen to enable us to keep some of our assets/funding, and for the Government to claim there is a contingency in place?

I already know what the Bluelight hereabouts think of CCRF , they told us straight.

"If that's your plan and how you intend to do things, you may as well bring brooms for all the use you will be"
 
#10
smallbrownprivates said:
No.
Military personnel within the UK have the same powers of arrest and detention as a normal civilian.
Any deployment for a MACA request but with MACP responsibilities requirements would be difficult as troops would have to go through OPTAG or equivalent (ISYN), before you even factor in weapons ROE etc etc.

Funnily enough a doorman with an SIA licence would have more solid legal ground to stand on.

Any troops on the ground would be in support of the Police (they normally have Primacy) and bring either skills that that Category 1 responders do not have (EOD/RESA) or a capability that would take too long for the civil authorities to generate.
The Military brings "Tempo" to the response phase.

CCRF may not in fact be day to day politically deployable, but it is a "reserve" if the balloon really goes up. and helps justify the TA's existance, as no one wants to totally get rid of something just in case it does save the day - however this as a reason is getting slimmer and slimmer as private security starts to move in to post Iraq markets
We can always call on the Legion of Frontiersmen instead.
 
#11
As smallbrownprivates said the CCRF aren't politically deployable, otherwise they would have been used for the flooding last year in Glouscester. To deploy the CCRF would be red rag to a bull for the journo's to start shrieking that the regular armed forces are so overstreched that they can't even man flood defences. In reality, short of national war, the CCRF won't be used here let alone in Louisiana!
 
#12
The USNG is a very different animal to the UK TA, and this is reflected in the way it can be, and is, used.

If such a thing occurs here the units called upon would just be filling sand bags and directing traffic. Freeing up the blue-light services to do the real work, assuming they arn't on strike at the time.
 
#13
Countrylad said:
As smallbrownprivates said the CCRF aren't politically deployable, otherwise they would have been used for the flooding last year in Glouscester. To deploy the CCRF would be red rag to a bull for the journo's to start shrieking that the regular armed forces are so overstreched that they can't even man flood defences. In reality, short of national war, the CCRF won't be used here let alone in Louisiana!
But the floods in Glouscester were managed by a TA Bde HQ ( 43 Wessex) and if you chat to some of the staff that were there, THEY were the ones having a laugh at the "bluelights" and Thames water.

Army -"So what's the plan Mr Thames Water to supply drinking water for 500,000 people in the next 24 hours"

Mr Thames Water - " No probs, we're professionals and prepared with 5 million litres in bottles, so there"

Army -"Great, so how is it getting here and where is it being stored and how are you going to manage your DPs?"

Mr Thames Water - " Lorries I guess, not really up to us, someone else has to bring it here, whatta you mean storage and what is a DP?"

Army - " Just wanted to know if anyone had though about the physical distribution of this stuff"

Mr Thames Water - " Dunno, I've got a powerpoint presentation somewhere but I'm sure it doesn't get bogged down into the detail of how to actually do it - got some brilliant graphics though"

Army - "Get me a brew and the SO2 G4, quickly, this is going to take time"

Mr Thames Water - "Can't have a brew mate, all the Starbucks have been flooded and cappacinos didn't get a mention on the power point presentation, but pages 20 through to page 100 will give you all the details you need on the PR plan"

Cheers
 
#14
Hootch said:
Countrylad said:
As smallbrownprivates said the CCRF aren't politically deployable, otherwise they would have been used for the flooding last year in Glouscester. To deploy the CCRF would be red rag to a bull for the journo's to start shrieking that the regular armed forces are so overstreched that they can't even man flood defences. In reality, short of national war, the CCRF won't be used here let alone in Louisiana!
But the floods in Glouscester were managed by a TA Bde HQ ( 43 Wessex) and if you chat to some of the staff that were there, THEY were the ones having a laugh at the "bluelights" and Thames water.

Army -"So what's the plan Mr Thames Water to supply drinking water for 500,000 people in the next 24 hours"

Mr Thames Water - " No probs, we're professionals and prepared with 5 million litres in bottles, so there"

Army -"Great, so how is it getting here and where is it being stored and how are you going to manage your DPs?"

Mr Thames Water - " Lorries I guess, not really up to us, someone else has to bring it here, whatta you mean storage and what is a DP?"

Army - " Just wanted to know if anyone had though about the physical distribution of this stuff"

Mr Thames Water - " Dunno, I've got a powerpoint presentation somewhere but I'm sure it doesn't get bogged down into the detail of how to actually do it - got some brilliant graphics though"

Army - "Get me a brew and the SO2 G4, quickly, this is going to take time"

Mr Thames Water - "Can't have a brew mate, all the Starbucks have been flooded and cappacinos didn't get a mention on the power point presentation, but pages 20 through to page 100 will give you all the details you need on the PR plan"

Cheers
Very good and probably worryingly close to verbatim.
 
#15
smallbrownprivates said:
The Military brings "Tempo" to the response phase.
HAHAHAHAHAHA

They may as well bring Nescafe.

msr
 
#16
Countrylad said:
As smallbrownprivates said the CCRF aren't politically deployable, otherwise they would have been used for the flooding last year in Glouscester. To deploy the CCRF would be red rag to a bull for the journo's to start shrieking that the regular armed forces are so overstreched that they can't even man flood defences. In reality, short of national war, the CCRF won't be used here let alone in Louisiana!
just to highlight the TA did deploy significantly to Gloucester in predominatly LO and C4I roles
 
#17
smallbrownprivates said:
Countrylad said:
As smallbrownprivates said the CCRF aren't politically deployable, otherwise they would have been used for the flooding last year in Glouscester. To deploy the CCRF would be red rag to a bull for the journo's to start shrieking that the regular armed forces are so overstreched that they can't even man flood defences. In reality, short of national war, the CCRF won't be used here let alone in Louisiana!
just to highlight the TA did deploy significantly to Gloucester in predominatly LO and C4I roles
But 23,000 significantly? Like the Louisiana NG?

Quantity has a quality all of its own.
 
#18
msr said:
smallbrownprivates said:
The Military brings "Tempo" to the response phase.
HAHAHAHAHAHA

They may as well bring Nescafe.

msr
Local government think in "committee", there is no single formal "commander" at bronze.
A LCpl and a Sgt who knew how how to use/abuse a LWT produced enough "tempo" (or doing the job before others have thought how to start it) to save Walham
 
#19
smallbrownprivates said:
Countrylad said:
As smallbrownprivates said the CCRF aren't politically deployable, otherwise they would have been used for the flooding last year in Glouscester. To deploy the CCRF would be red rag to a bull for the journo's to start shrieking that the regular armed forces are so overstreched that they can't even man flood defences. In reality, short of national war, the CCRF won't be used here let alone in Louisiana!
just to highlight the TA did deploy significantly to Gloucester in predominatly LO and C4I roles

Didn't know that, I knew that our (43 bde) was involved in running it, but I wasn't aware that there was a significant presence, especially as the two largest formations in the brigade (6 Rifles & RWxY) were on exercise on the plain at the time! They kept that one quiet then.
 
#20
Countrylad said:
smallbrownprivates said:
Countrylad said:
As smallbrownprivates said the CCRF aren't politically deployable, otherwise they would have been used for the flooding last year in Glouscester. To deploy the CCRF would be red rag to a bull for the journo's to start shrieking that the regular armed forces are so overstreched that they can't even man flood defences. In reality, short of national war, the CCRF won't be used here let alone in Louisiana!
just to highlight the TA did deploy significantly to Gloucester in predominatly LO and C4I roles

Didn't know that, I knew that our (43 bde) was involved in running it, but I wasn't aware that there was a significant presence, especially as the two largest formations in the brigade (6 Rifles & RWxY) were on exercise on the plain at the time! They kept that one quiet then.
I think that depends on your definition of 'significant'...
 

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