Lots of rusty guns...

#1
I've just come across all these pictures. The guy's site seems to be well weird, but I'm just curious about what these pictures are of, there appears to be a mixture of countries and eras represented.

http://www.project-x.org.uk/armsdump.html

(Not that I want to go there and start playing with them, you understand :twisted: )











 
#2
I've seen these photos a few times before. If I remember correctly they are the aftermath of a fire at some storage depot in Vietnam.
 
#3
Vietnam? They have everything from G3's to Bren's. I was expecting to see some Brown Bess's amongst them.
 
#4
Well I could be mistaken as to the location, but all the weapons in the photos were used in Vietnam.

We dropped tons of weaponry to the Vietnamese during the Japanese occupation, and the Americans gave/sold them loads of stuff (both US and foreign made) when they were active in the area. This included a load of ex-Wehrmacht stuff for some reason.

T_T
 
#5
Lots of Chinese ammo of 7.92mm supplied to the Viet Minh, was able to be used in German weapons that Uncle Joe gifted to Uncle Ho.
 
#8
The French used loads of exWW2 German kit in Indo China just after WW2, there's even a WW1 Hotchkiss in one photo
 
#9
Spotted:
x1 Co Ax
Numerous M60s
Stacks of Thomsons
What looks like parts of a Browning .50
Think that there are 1 or 2 Stoners there too.
 
#10
Spotted

Miniguns, RPG's, .30cal MG's
M60's and Brens
Loads of Thompsons
Pile of M60's
 
#11
These pictures have been around a for a while, and have every gun nut in the world weeping into their coffee.... some of the scrap is a collector's dream - FG42, MP44, etc.

Other pictures in the series show piles of British No1s, No4s, Brens, etc.

The VC seem to have owned examples of every single firearm made during the 19th & 20th century, no matter how obscure. This amazing photo came to light showing a VC using a rare Lee Enfield No1 MkV trials rifle:

 
#12
Tartan_Terrier said:
I've seen these photos a few times before. If I remember correctly they are the aftermath of a fire at some storage depot in Vietnam.
If there had been a fire there would be no wood left, that lot has just been left out in the weather for a very long time.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
By a rough calculation, there must have been at least ten million Lee Enfields produced for WW1 - what happened to them? Why did we have to go to the Americans in 1939 to buy rifles? And what happened to the next ten million or more Lee Enfields produced for WW2?

(At school the rifles we had for the CCF all had 1917 or 1918 stamped on them but that doesn't account for very many!)

I never understood why the RN changed over to the SLR in 1967. The old thing was a nice simple piece of kit (apart from its unnecessarily complicated and fiddly backsight compared to the original) and was just the job for sailors who could not have much time allocated to small arms training beyond what was then called their Annual Musketry Course (1 day per year IF you could get the hands out of their heads of dept).
 
#14
seaweed said:
By a rough calculation, there must have been at least ten million Lee Enfields produced for WW1 - what happened to them? Why did we have to go to the Americans in 1939 to buy rifles? And what happened to the next ten million or more Lee Enfields produced for WW2?

(At school the rifles we had for the CCF all had 1917 or 1918 stamped on them but that doesn't account for very many!)

I never understood why the RN changed over to the SLR in 1967. The old thing was a nice simple piece of kit (apart from its unnecessarily complicated and fiddly backsight compared to the original) and was just the job for sailors who could not have much time allocated to small arms training beyond what was then called their Annual Musketry Course (1 day per year IF you could get the hands out of their heads of dept).
Over 60,000 Enfields were made in the US during WW2 for the Chinese
 
#15
it's still very sad to see things like this left to rot, if we so much as had a mite of dust in the bore we were nigh on crucified!
 
#16
#17
tropper66 said:
seaweed said:
By a rough calculation, there must have been at least ten million Lee Enfields produced for WW1 - what happened to them? Why did we have to go to the Americans in 1939 to buy rifles? And what happened to the next ten million or more Lee Enfields produced for WW2?

(At school the rifles we had for the CCF all had 1917 or 1918 stamped on them but that doesn't account for very many!)
Over 60,000 Enfields were made in the US during WW2 for the Chinese
About 4 million No1 rifles were made during WW1, and another million or so existed pre-war. At the end of WW1, UK had just over 2 million rifles left - so perhaps 3 million were destroyed.

About a million rifles were scrapped or distributed around the Empire during the inter-war years, so UK entered WW2 with around a million No1s and c.250,000 unused P14s (built during WW1 but never used for front-line service). Contrary to one of the many Dunkirk myths, UK was never short of rifles for the existing regular forces and territorials; but like WW1, it was expected that the armed forces would expand to 5-6 million - and it was these that needed new volume rifle production.

As WW2 kicked off, orders were placed for the modernised No4 rifle (which had been developed during the 1930s). Eventually, two million No4s were made in UK (BSA, Maltby & Fazakerley), and one million each in USA (Savage) and Canada (Long Branch). UK forces mostly re-equipped with No4s, and most of the surviving No1s were sent to Australia and India. Australia and India continued their own production of No1 rifles throughout the war (until the 1950s in Australia and the late 1980s in India).

Following WW2, most UK No4s were refurbished and placed into store. Vast numbers were again distributed around the Commonwealth and as military aid to liberated countries (Greece, Turkey, Belgium, France, Denmark, Syria, Yugoslavia, Albania, Indo-China, etc, were some of the many non-Commonwealth countries that had British equipment for a while).

Of the millions of rifles made, many/most have by now been destroyed. There are a few big owners still out there (India is believed to still use 2 million Enfield rifles), but most countries have now taken them out of reserve and sent them for the chop. A heck of a lot of No4s were dumped into the sea by UK. Hundreds of thousands more were bought up by post-war arms dealers. USA alone has swallowed huge numbers - many of which ended their days been sporterised or otherwise butchered by rednecks...

In recent years, UK has adopted the policy that civilian gun ownership is a bad thing, so large numbers of surplus rifles withdrawn from cadets and TA units have simply been scrapped (as will be the inevitable fate of the No8 .22 rifles when they are withdrawn from cadets).
 
#19
björn said:
seems like its in Crete... Some of the items are marked 'Maleme'. Any idea of the whereabouts of this war museum? I'm off to Crete and would probably want to have a look.
It is, yeah, well spotted: it's the Sfakia War Museum, up in mountainous Paddy L-F territory.

Judging by the local Beirut unload vids on youtube (type in 'opla kreta' or 'zoniana'), amongst all the Albanian AKs there's a fair few Thompsons and MP40s still knocking around in vastly better nick...
 
#20
When i was walking through the mountains in Crete, following the route of the British retreat i met an old farmer who had a couple of stens and a MP40 in his shed
 

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