Lost in translation- American to English and vice versa

#1
I've been coming to site for a while now and I think my (Queens) English vocabulary has expanded greatly.

So, in an effort to expand ever further or firm up what I know here goes. Please correct me if I'm wrong:

US
Shit = Just about anything.

UK
Shit = well, shit.

US
Young Criminal/Wannabe Ganstah = delinquent

UK
Young Criminal/Wannabe Ganstah = Chav


UK
Fag = cigarette

US
Fag = Homsexual


US
Crap = shit (Which can be used instead of)

UK
crap = ?


UK
tosser = Masterbater ?

US
tosser = someone who threw something

UK
Retarded Person = Mong

US
Retarded Person = F*cktard


Funny, I just realized I only know the questionable terms from reading this site. Heh.


Anyone got any more?
 
#3
Biscuit

UK
A Biscuit, like a hobnob or a McVities Digestive.

US
Its a muffin over the pond.

Cookie

UK
A large soft or hard, but thin (for its size) biscuit.

US
Any type of biscuit really.
 

mysteron

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
Pants

UK - Underwear and also a polite term to describe something that is not very good, i.e. That looks pants boss.

US - Trousers.
 
#5
Suspenders:
UK - Something to hold your nylons up
US - Braces

Rubber:
UK - For removing pencil marks
US - For preventing children and STDs.

Vest:
UK - worn inside the shirt
US - worn outside the shirt

Sketchy:
UK - Incomplete information
US - Decidedly dodgy

I'm sure there are more.

PB
 
#7
Hello ghost_us,

after a meal in a restaurant an Englishman asks for the bill and pays with a cheque,an American asks for the cheque (check?) and pays with a bill.

Is "Puff Daddy" also a homosexual father in the States?

tangosix.
 
#9
LSD:
US - a psychedelic drug
UK - Currency (to those of a certain age)

Pound Sign:
UK - In the UK it's £
US - In the US it's #

Warrant Officer:
US - Something you salute (apparently)
UK - They work for a living
 
#11
US:
Dump -somewhere you can dump your old televisions/fridges/murdered ginger step children.

UK:
Dump- something you take in the comfort of your own trousers/on the toilet/in a field.
 
#15
PassingBells said:
Pound Sign:
UK - In the UK it's £
US - In the US it's #
And on the phone:

US - # is a pound sign.
UK - # is a hash key.

Even better:

US - speed bump.
UK - sleeping policeman.

That one completely threw me first time I heard it in a parking lot (whoops, car park). :D
 
#16
Recreational Outing
US - Vacation
UK - Holiday

Nationally Recognized Day off (ie: Christmas)
US - Holiday
UK - ?

Why does the US say "I'm in the hospital" but UK would say "I'm in hospital".

Is it considered the structure you are in? Not sure about that.
 
#17
ghost_us said:
Recreational Outing
US - Vacation
UK - Holiday

Nationally Recognized Day off (ie: Christmas)
US - Holiday
UK - ?

Why does the US say "I'm in the hospital" but UK would say "I'm in hospital".

Is it considered the structure you are in? Not sure about that.
Recreational Outing
US - Boondoggle
UK - Skiving off

Why is it that the US, possibly the most ultra-conservative Christian country in the world doesn't celebrate Good Friday as a National Holiday (UK = Bank Holiday)?
 
#18
PassingBells said:
Warrant Officer:
US - Something you salute (apparently)
UK - They work for a living

So wait guys, I'm a Warrant Officer in the US (newly promoted) and I'm coming to the UK. You guys WILL salute me right? :D
 
#20
and then theres the Story of the actor Richard Burton doing a love scene in some film or other - Old Richard is getting to grips with the young lady, the Orchestra is playing in the background and the Director, an American gentleman, tells Richard to "Grab her Fanny".
Richard promptly did as instructed and received a whopping Slap from the young Damsel in return.

In the UK the Fanny is the Woman`s front bits.in the US her Arrse.

It is rumoured that although his Cheek was red from the slap, he was smiling like a Chesire cat.
:)
 

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