Lord its a miracle, I is healed - Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

This is about my experience with Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections.

I can't run anymore as I have a lumbar disc that is knacked and the bouncing around when running puts me down for a few days. Due to this I switched over to mountain biking as my chosen form of self-beasting to keep the weight off, and stay fit. I try not to do anything at half speed so I throw myself into whatever I am doing, sometimes the results are painful, but satisfying.....in that masochistic way that squaddies stay fit.

Anyway, over the years I have come off the mountain bike, the motorcycle, fallen off mountains and other stupidities resulting in what the Doc called micro-tears of the ligaments and muscles. Both my rotator cuffs (shoulder joints) have suffered badly from where, like any other half sane person, I put my arm out to break a fall. I thought my left rotator cuff was totally knacked about 5 years ago when I came off the bike, turned out it was not totally torn away and I was told that Darwin would sort me out nature would take its course and it would get somewhat better to a degree on its own. Then around April this year I had another bad spill which did the same to my right rotator cuff.

I had over the years read about various treatment options: Stem cell; platelet rich plasma, prolotherapy. These are the treatments top end athletes and footie players have if they have some form of muscle, or ligament damage. About 15 years ago I previously had prolotherapy in the ligaments of my lower back to strengthen them to help stabilise, and compensate for my slipped disc. That seemed to work. I did some reading around the subject of platelet rich plasma and saw it had been invented/discovered by a cardiac surgeon to speed recovery of heart op patients - so far so good. Then I read about various other top end athletes who were seriously injured, months of recovery expected, and then they were back in their game within a couple of months.

Ok, worth a punt. I found a sports medicine bloke near me and made an appointment. I went along and told him I was interested in prolotherapy to build up the ligaments in my shoulders as I was noticing some weakness from the injuries. He prodded and poked, then told me that to be honest PRP was my best option, stem cell would be overkill, and prolotherapy would strengthen and not heal the damage. I pointed out my left shoulder injury was five years old. Not a problem says he, it will work its magic, it may take two treatments, but it would work......and at the end of the day 2 treatments was still cheaper than one stem cell treatment.

I went back later for the treatment, they took a huge, BFO syringe full of blood out of me, twirled it to separate the plasma out then injected the resultant liquid into all the ligaments in both my shoulders. Not painful, as such.

Life went on for about a couple of weeks, the pain was still there. Then just as I was thinking it had been a bit of voodoo and a waste of money I started to get a feeling in both shoulder areas, sort of a light itch and a gentle tickling type feeling. That carried on for about 5 weeks. The shoulders were starting to actually feel good at the 6 week point, nowhere near the previous pain levels. At the 8 week point I went back for a check up visit and he told me that the sensations were normal and simply the internal healing process going on, and that should be done by the 12 week point.

Well, at the 12 week point it felt as if the shoulders had never been damaged. To say I am impressed with the PRP treatment is an understatement and I wish I had had it done a couple of years ago. I am going back to get my right knee, both elbows, and my fingers done at around xmas. The knee I blew out 3 years ago with a huge crash, and a couple of fingers are showing signs of osteo-arthritis probably related to using tools when working on houses, and as the elbows take any shock before it hits the shoulder the ligaments in mine have some damage.

In conclusion: If any of yooz, those you love, or know have muscle damage, ligament damage, osteo-arthritis, and even balditis have a look at PRP - even for old injuries like mine. Not as expensive as the stem cell miracle cures, and probably almost as good. As an indicator my treatment cost me $950 for both shoulders. The knee, elbows and fingers are going to cost me around $1100.


 
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Just a quick afterword: You know how you sort of wince, or brace up when you know doing something is going to hurt. Well I still find myself doing that with actions related to my shoulders, and smile about it when I notice. I honestly reckon the treatment has taken over 20 years of damage off my rotator cuffs.
 
This is about my experience with Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections.

I can't run anymore as I have a lumbar disc that is knacked and the bouncing around when running puts me down for a few days. Due to this I switched over to mountain biking as my chosen form of self-beasting to keep the weight off, and stay fit. I try not to do anything at half speed so I throw myself into whatever I am doing, sometimes the results are painful, but satisfying.....in that masochistic way squaddies stay fit.

Anyway, over the years I have come off the mountain bike, the motorcycle, fallen off mountains and other stupidities resulting in what the Doc called micro-tears of the ligaments and muscles. Both my rotator cuffs (shoulder joints) have suffered badly from where, like any other half sane person, I put my arm out to break a fall. I thought my left rotator cuff was totally knacked about 5 years ago when I came off the bike, turned out it was not totally torn away and I was told that Darwin would sort me out nature would take its course and it would get somewhat better to a degree on its own. Then around April this year I had another bad spill which did the same to my right rotator cuff.

I had over the years read about various treatment options: Stem cell; platelet rich plasma, prolotherapy. These are the treatments top end athletes and footie players have if they have some form of muscle, or ligament damage. About 15 years ago I previously had prolotherapy in the ligaments of my lower back to strengthen them to help stabilise, and compensate for my slipped disc. That seemed to work. I did some reading around the subject of platelet rich plasma and saw it had been invented/discovered by a cardiac surgeon to speed recovery of heart op patients - so far so good. Then I read about various other top end athletes who were seriously injured, months of recovery expected, and then they were back in their game within a couple of months.

Ok, worth a punt. I found a sports medicine bloke near me and made an appointment. I went along and told him I was interested in prolotherapy to build up the ligaments in my shoulders as I was noticing some weakness from the injuries. He prodded and poked, then told me that to be honest PRP was my best option, stem cell would be overkill, and prolotherapy would strengthen and not heal the damage. I pointed out my left shoulder injury was five years old. Not a problem says he, it will work its magic, it may take two treatments, but it would work......and at the end of the day 2 treatments was still cheaper than one stem cell treatment.

I went back later for the treatment, they took a huge, BFO syringe full of blood out of me, twirled it to separate the plasma out then injected the resultant liquid into all the ligaments in both my shoulders. No pain, as such.

Life went on for about a couple of weeks, the pain was still there. Then just as I was thinking it had been a bit of voodoo and a waste of money I started to get a feeling in both shoulder areas, sort of a light itch and a gentle tickling type feeling. That carried on for about 5 weeks. The shoulders were starting to actually feel good at the 6 week point, nowhere near the previous pain levels. At the 8 week point I went back for a check up visit and he told me that the sensations were normal and simply the internal healing process going on, and that should be done by the 12 week point.

Well, at the 12 week point it felt as if the shoulders had never been damaged. To say I am impressed with the PRP treatment is an understatement and I wish I had had it done a couple of years ago. I am going back to get my right knee, both elbows, and my fingers done at around xmas. The knee I blew out 3 years ago with a huge crash, and a couple of fingers are showing signs of osteo-arthritis probably related to using tools when working on houses, and as the elbows take any shock before it hits the shoulder the ligaments in mine have some damage.

In conclusion: If any of yooz, those you love, or know have muscle damage, ligament damage, osteo-arthritis, and even balditis have a look at PRP - even for old injuries like mine. Not as expensive as the stem cell miracle cures, and probably almost as good. As an indicator my treatment cost me $950 for both shoulders. The knee, elbows and fingers are going to cost me around $1100.



At which hospital are you having the other three procedures done? My left knee is starting to give out so this could be in my very near future. I take it the prices above were your co-pay, is that right?

Hey man! I'm glad it's working for you and that you're starting to feel better again.
 
At which hospital are you having the other three procedures done? My left knee is starting to give out so this could be in my very near future. I take it the prices above were your co-pay, is that right?

Hey man! I'm glad it's working for you and that you're starting to feel better again.

The Doc does this in his out of hospital practice, it is basically all he does privately. He has a steady stream of sports injured youngsters, some of the local pro-athletes, and old farts like us deciding there is potentially something better than hurting all the time.


Insurance does not recognise the treatment, it is 100% self pay - the initial consult is covered.

You should be able to find someone up your way who does this. If you are paying for it The important thing is they need the special centrifuge containers which hold back a percentage of platelets in the plasma when spun up. They also need an ultrasound imager to watch that they stick the needle into the ligaments properly.

That said; I was chatting to the Doc about it the whole thing and he reckoned it is not outside the bounds of DIY for someone with some medical training. Docs in Africa are using salad spinners as centrifuges, and with some prodding and poking you can find the ligaments to push the needle into.

Serious bit: I know your Mrs will probably nag you, but…. You are healing micro-tears and old injuries, continued vigorous activity will prevent healing by continually re-opening the tears. You seriously need to take it easy on the treated body part for around 6 weeks to allow healing.

For those who are wondering why it works: Blood provides the main self repair substances for the body. There are parts of the body that have very, very few blood vessels running to them. The result is that if you damage one of these areas you will likely not heal properly, or fully. This treatment directly injects the plasma with the main repair substances into those damaged parts allowing the body to continue the healing process from the point it got to under its own steam.

And it does help with baldness, look at old photos of Elon Musk. He had PRP injections into his scalp, along with some hair transplant, and now he has a full head of hair. For people with baldness that still leaves the fuzz on the head PRP can help activate the roots to grow thicker, longer hair again. Weird, but, hey the whole thing is weird, but it works and I am happy my rotator cuffs are now pain free.
 
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The Doc does this in his out of hospital practice, it is basically all he does privately. He has a steady stream of sports injured youngsters, some of the local pro-athletes, and old farts like us deciding there is potentially something better than hurting all the time.


Insurance does not recognise the treatment, it is 100% self pay - the initial consult is covered.

You should be able to find someone up your way who does this. If you are paying for it The important thing is they need the special centrifuge containers which hold back a percentage of platelets in the plasma when spun up. They also need an ultrasound imager to watch that they stick the needle into the ligaments properly.

That said; I was chatting to the Doc about it the whole thing and he reckoned it is not outside the bounds of DIY for someone with some medical training. Docs in Africa are using salad spinners as centrifuges, and with some prodding and poking you can find the ligaments to push the needle into.

Serious bit: I know your Mrs will probably nag you, but…. You are healing micro-tears and old injuries, continued vigorous activity will prevent healing by continually re-opening the tears. You seriously need to take it easy on the treated body part for around 6 weeks to allow healing.

For those who are wondering why it works: Blood provides the main self repair substances for the body. There are parts of the body that have very, very few blood vessels running to them. The result is that if you damage one of these areas you will likely not heal properly, or fully. This treatment directly injects the plasma with the main repair substances into those damaged parts allowing the body to continue the healing process from the point it got to under its own steam.

And it does help with baldness, look at old photos of Elon Musk. He had PRP injections into his scalp, along with some hair transplant, and now he has a full head of hair. For people with baldness that still leaves the fuzz on the head PRP can help activate the roots to grow thicker, longer hair again. Weird, but, hey the whole thing is weird, but it works and I am happy my rotator cuffs are now pain free.

Happy to say that my insurance does cover this treatment and it can be done in a hospital a couple of hours drive from here. Herself is doing some research into it as well regarding the best places for treatment.
 
Happy to say that my insurance does cover this treatment and it can be done in a hospital a couple of hours drive from here. Herself is doing some research into it as well regarding the best places for treatment.

You lucky bar steward having insurance that covers it. I was under the impression that it was one of those treatments insurance don't cover because if they did everyone would go get it done.

Best of luck with it, I do not think you will be disappointed, just let the knee rest afterwards to let the internal healing happen undisturbed.
 
You lucky bar steward having insurance that covers it. I was under the impression that it was one of those treatments insurance don't cover because if they did everyone would go get it done.

Best of luck with it, I do not think you will be disappointed, just let the knee rest afterwards to let the internal healing happen undisturbed.

When I joined the State Police I came under the old (excellent) benefits and pension plan. They tried to stick us with their new plan which came in around 1998/9, our union told them to do one and it never changed.
 
A quick explanation of the Prolotherapy mentioned above.

When they told me I had a slipped lumbar disc I started reading up on potential fixes. Understand please though: A slipped disc, prolapsed disc, herniated disc, whatever you want to call it, cannot be fixed. It will always be there, it just may not be touching a nerve in and around the spinal cord so you do not feel any pain, or weird sensations.

Side bar: I noticed something peculiar about my gait, and a sensation on my right shin when I was running - I was in my late 40's at the time. MRI and the Doc told me I had a slipped disc. Up until that point in my life I was invincible.

Back on track: I started researching possible miracle cures for a slipped disc and came across a Doc in the UK who had written quite widely about prolotherapy being of varying benefit to people with bad backs, and slipped discs - basically anything from some use to a vast improvement. His approach was to use prolotherapy to strengthen the ligaments in the lower back thereby strengthening, and adding more lower back stability.

Ligaments do not naturally have much blood flow through them, that is why it takes forever, or even never, for a damaged ligament to heal.

Prolotherapy is simply an injection into a ligament of medical saline containing medical grade glucose.

The saline is just the transport medium. The glucose though causes an irritation in the ligament that causes more blood to flow. The increased blood flow then provides the basis for healing, or ligament growth/strengthening.

Using BUPA I went to see a couple of Docs in the UK to get input from two blokes who administer the treatment. This treatment is one of those things that professional sportsmen have done if they get injured with a ligament tear, or injury. Both Docs I visited had a whole host of sports stars on their list of former patients, those included golfers with arm ligament injuries, footie players, rugby players, cricketers, and a fair few olympians from many disciplines.

I had my lower back ligaments done. I am told they got bigger, therefore stronger, which added stability to my lower back.

I had it done at this place: Blackberry Clinic | Musculoskeletal Medicine and Sports Injury Clinic

There are lots of pains and niggles which eventually catch up with you and they are, to some degree, fixable and a very simple treatment can reduce pain, and increase quality of life beyond what the Doc at the local surgery can offer. Just look at some of the massive bang ups soccer players have on the field where they are carted off on a stretcher and six weeks later they are back after going through PRP, prolotherapy, or stem cell treatment.
 
@Effendi,
Many thanks for the heads up on this.
Guess I'll be trying to book an appointment with my GP, see if I can get this for my knees.
 
I dunno where the NHS is on this treatment so you may need to go private. I did quick UK google and found plenty of links, this was one I found: ===> Using Injections For Joint Pain | Health Matters | BMI Healthcare | BMI Healthcare
I found a few articles online showing it being used in some NHS Trust areas. NICE have OK'd it as a treatment but it is not in common use yet and they are trying to get more evidence to support it's use.
Guess I'll have to do some more digging and show my GP.
I have an open referral to the Veterans' Orthopaedic Service at the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital so should be able to fine someone to discuss it with.
 
I found a few articles online showing it being used in some NHS Trust areas. NICE have OK'd it as a treatment but it is not in common use yet and they are trying to get more evidence to support it's use.
Guess I'll have to do some more digging and show my GP.
I have an open referral to the Veterans' Orthopaedic Service at the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital so should be able to fine someone to discuss it with.

Go for it.

I am happy with my rotator cuff results compared to how they were pre-treatment. As said up top I am going to get a knee (maybe both), my elbows and fingers done. Knees and elbows are wear and tear, I have a couple of fingers showing some osteo-arthritis wear and tear so I am going to get those done at the same time - get it all out of the way in one go.
 

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