Looks like Democrats take the House

#1
Correspondents say that Democratic control of even one house of Congress could mean legislative gridlock.

It would enable the Democrats to hold greater influence on Congressional committees, launch investigations into the war in Iraq, limit spending in Iraq and stall other Bush administration policies.
Latest position
 
#2
Yep more compulsive than ARRSE watching the results come in
 
#3
armchair_jihad said:
Yep more compulsive than ARRSE watching the results come in
Tis indeed... looks like it's all down to Virginia!!!

Did chuckle at this material for conspiracy theorists:

Meanwhile, the Clintons' daughter Chelsea was turned away from a Manhattan voting booth because she was not on a list of registered voters.

Her name had been sent to the wrong polling station, and she was offered an "affidavit vote" which will be counted later once her details are confirmed.
 
#5
And Daniel Ortega is President of Nicaragua!

George W is not looking good :lol:
 
#6
armchair_jihad said:
and Karl Rove is toast!
But don't misunderestimate George W :D

What's the relationship between the House of Representatives and the Senate? Do both have equal say in whether bills are passed? Could a Republican Senate block a Democrat House of Reps? :D
 
#7
House of Representatives controls the money......snigger and can hold investigations into dubious conduct (Iraq rebuilding anyone?)
 
#8
What would be their agenda? The Republicans promoted a democracy worldwide. So the Democrats would promote republican form of governance in such countries as Saudi Arabia Jordan, United Emirates or Quwait.
 
#9
Could a Republican Senate block a Democrat House of Reps?
Yes, though I think it's going to be 50-49 for the Ds. As long as Pelosi doesn't try a new "Assault Weapons Ban." Hopefully the D's learned from the last time, when they got turfed out as a result.


On other (local) news, the Governator has absolutely terminated Angelide's challenge. Tom McClintock looks like taking the Lt Governor's slot, which surprises me as I thought he was a bit too far to the right for California. Jerry Brown has pretty much demolished Chuck Poochigian. I'm a little surprised at that, in the race for the State's Top Cop, the person presiding over the US's third-most-dangerous city has beaten the chap who has the endorsement of the majority of law enforcement types. Must be the name recognition.

The abortion notification bill is suprisingly close, but is leaning towards being defeated. The tax-on-oil one looks like it's shot shot down reasonably thoroughly. What surprises me is that the eminent domain bill is failing, 49.4% Yes, 50.6% No. Still time for that one to turn around. (What is it about the Democratic areas voting to allow Eminent domain for commerical use?) The large increase in cigarette taxes has also been fairly much demolished. All the bond measures have been approved. GPS monitoring for sex offenders is overwhelmingly approved. "It's for the children" wins over reality yet again.

Elsewhere I see Michigan has voted against Affirmative Action. I approve. R.I. has approved voting rights for felons on parole and probation. AZ's further-than-most eminent-domain referendum has passed too. Good. (I still can't get over CA's one losing). English is now AZ's official language. The voter incentive initiative has been sadly defeated, however. (A random voter would win $1m: Talk about a way of getting people to the polls)

PA's veterans are looking like they're going to get their $500 each.

NTM
 
#10
Ancient_Mariner said:
What's the relationship between the House of Representatives and the Senate? Do both have equal say in whether bills are passed? Could a Republican Senate block a Democrat House of Reps? :D
Forgive me for cribbing from Wikipedia, but I'm too lazy to type a response myself (what can I say, I'm a product of California schools):

Relationship:

United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. Each state is represented in the House proportionally to its population, and is entitled to at least one Representative. The total number of Representatives is currently fixed at 435 by the Reapportionment Act of 1929, though Congress has the authority to change that number. Each Representative serves for a two-year term and may be re-elected an unlimited number of times. The presiding officer of the House is known as the Speaker, and is elected by the members.

The bicameral Congress arose from the desire of the Founders to create a "house of the people" that would represent public opinion, balanced by a more deliberative Senate that would represent the governments of the individual states, and would be less susceptible to variations of mass sentiment. The House is often considered the "lower house," and the Senate as the "upper house," although the United States Constitution does not use such language. The Constitution provides that the approval of both houses is necessary for the passage of legislation.

The House is generally considered a more partisan chamber than the Senate. Many of the Founding Fathers intended the Senate (whose members were originally chosen by the state legislatures) to be a check on the popularly elected House, just as the House was to be a check on the Senate. The "advice and consent" powers (such as the power to approve treaties) were therefore granted to the Senate alone. The House was granted its own exclusive powers: the power to initiate revenue bills, impeach officials, and elect the President in electoral college deadlocks. The Senate, however, can propose amendments to spending bills, try impeached officials, and choose the Vice President in an electoral college deadlock. The Senate and its members generally have greater prestige than the House since Senators serve longer terms (six years) in a smaller body and (in most cases) represent larger constituencies than Representatives.
Legislation:

Most bills may be introduced in either House of Congress. However, the Constitution provides that "All bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives." As a result, the Senate does not have the power to initiate bills imposing taxes. Furthermore, the House of Representatives holds that the Senate does not have the power to originate appropriation bills, or bills authorizing the expenditure of federal funds. Historically, the Senate has disputed the interpretation advocated by the House. However, whenever the Senate originates an appropriations bill, the House simply refuses to consider it, thereby settling the dispute in practice. The constitutional provision barring the Senate from introducing revenue bills is based on the practice of the British Parliament, in which only the House of Commons may originate such measures.

Although it cannot originate revenue bills, the Senate retains the power to amend or reject them.

The approval of both the Senate and the House of Representatives is required for any bill, including a revenue bill, to become law. Both Houses must pass the exact same version of the bill; if there are differences, they may be resolved by a conference committee, which includes members of both bodies. For the stages through which bills pass in the Senate, see Act of Congress.
 
#11
Hilary absolutely romped New Yoick.

£20.00 on her this morning to be the next President I think.
 
#12
California_Tanker said:
Tom McClintock looks like taking the Lt Governor's slot, which surprises me as I thought he was a bit too far to the right for California.
I thought Garamendi was leading? (I'm really only watching the L.A. Times site, it could be outdated.)

If not, then I would hazard a guess that he ran a strong immigration platform? Among the California Republicans I know, that was the trigger issue since Iraq was no longer an "approved subject." I'd also guess that's effecting all the border states.

The abortion notification bill is suprisingly close, but is leaning towards being defeated.
Good.

English is now AZ's official language.
Yeah, run with that. :D

Edited to add: I'll see PTP's £20. I think it will be a cold day in hell before a majority of Americans (or their electoral college, anyway) are willing to put Mrs. Clinton in the White House.
 
#13
Get it on the barrel, there is a sea change coming in America

I don't think anything can have been as disastrous for that great nation as this administration, even Clinton II.


You think I should have a side bet on Leibermann? :D
 
#15
Rumour control working overtime that the Dems. have taken Senate too. Is that possible?

Oh, and well done Ms. Pelosi. First woman speaker, and a portent of things to come?
 
#16
PartTimePongo said:
Rumour control working overtime that the Dems. have taken Senate too. Is that possible?

Oh, and well done Ms. Pelosi. First woman speaker, and a portent of things to come?
Don't get too excited, this is a protest vote and nothing decent was on the TV (and it wasn't raining) so Democrat supporters actually decided to vote this time around.

The crackers, snake handlers and front-porch, rocking-chair generals won't trust anyone but the GOP come the presidentials.

As for foreign policy, which is all I'm really bothered about, the hornet's nest is already kicked in and a few cosmetic vote-winning decisions will have nothing positive to add to the situation. The hand on the tiller belongs to the business world, and while we're squabbling over how gay our politicians are, they're not being asked questions such as "why don't we have a long term energy strategy that allows disengagement from the middle east?" and "why isn't GSK et al buying the opiate product of afghanistan?"

It's all window dressing. My recommendation to the UK is to start lots of happy clappy churches and sway the politicians towards fundamental christianity. Gun ownership is sure to follow and at least we'll then have the means to defend ourselves when things go t1ts.
 
#17
California_Tanker said:
Could a Republican Senate block a Democrat House of Reps?
Yes, though I think it's going to be 50-49 for the Ds. As long as Pelosi doesn't try a new "Assault Weapons Ban." Hopefully the D's learned from the last time, when they got turfed out as a result.


On other (local) news, the Governator has absolutely terminated Angelide's challenge. Tom McClintock looks like taking the Lt Governor's slot, which surprises me as I thought he was a bit too far to the right for California. Jerry Brown has pretty much demolished Chuck Poochigian. I'm a little surprised at that, in the race for the State's Top Cop, the person presiding over the US's third-most-dangerous city has beaten the chap who has the endorsement of the majority of law enforcement types. Must be the name recognition.

The abortion notification bill is suprisingly close, but is leaning towards being defeated. The tax-on-oil one looks like it's shot shot down reasonably thoroughly. What surprises me is that the eminent domain bill is failing, 49.4% Yes, 50.6% No. Still time for that one to turn around. (What is it about the Democratic areas voting to allow Eminent domain for commerical use?) The large increase in cigarette taxes has also been fairly much demolished. All the bond measures have been approved. GPS monitoring for sex offenders is overwhelmingly approved. "It's for the children" wins over reality yet again.

Elsewhere I see Michigan has voted against Affirmative Action. I approve. R.I. has approved voting rights for felons on parole and probation. AZ's further-than-most eminent-domain referendum has passed too. Good. (I still can't get over CA's one losing). English is now AZ's official language. The voter incentive initiative has been sadly defeated, however. (A random voter would win $1m: Talk about a way of getting people to the polls)

PA's veterans are looking like they're going to get their $500 each.

NTM
You forgot to mention Steve Poizner as the new CA Insurance Commissioner, defeating former Lt Gov Cruz Bustamante- the cornerstone of Bustamante's campaign strategy being the fact that he lost 72lbs in weight. :? :roll:
 
#18
In the Senate, Democrats were edging slowly towards an even more dramatic victory. They needed to gain six Republican seats for a majority – a task most pundits had thought was beyond them.
Seems to be deeper than cosmetic progress.
 
#19
Hang on Fox News is saying that the GOP have won both the House of Representitives and the Senate!
 
#20
armchair_jihad said:
Hang on Fox News is saying that the GOP have won both the House of Representitives and the Senate!
Fox News? Isn't that a contradiction in terms...
 

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