Looking for obscure disbanded unit.

#1
Not sure where to cast my net, so to speak.

I recently found out my Grandad was a PSi of a TA unit 1946/1958 (approx) now the unit was in the town of Porthmadog (it's now an Aldi) and was Royal Welch Fusiliers, however it was also a Light AA unit possibly ___ Regt RA(RWF).
Must've specialised in Bofors 40mm as my Mam remembers Taid(Grandad) taking her for a ride on the Bofors (that's NOT a euphamism) to spice things up it was an Airborne unit.


Now Google isn't being my friend, does anyone know which way to point me? Much appreciated ta.
 
#2
Just done a quick Google for you. Hopefully this might help.

Territorial Army (TA) battalions
The four Territorial Force battalions were disbanded in 1919 but were re-formed in 1921 as part of the new Territorial Army, with the same designations as before, but with ‘TA’ in brackets after their title. The four battalions made up 158th (Royal Welch) Infantry Brigade. [The title was changed from (North Wales) to (Royal Welch) in 1924]. It was a difficult beginning for all Territorial battalions as post-war cutbacks in defence spending led to a dearth of up-to-date equipment. Units were kept going almost by enthusiasm alone.​
In the 1930s the situation eased and change took place. In 1938 the 5th (Flintshire) Battalion was converted to artillery and became the 60th (Royal Welch Fusiliers) Anti-tank Regiment Royal Artillery (TA). It survived, with various changes in title but always with ‘RWF’ included, until 1956. In 1939, with war with Germany inevitable, the size of the Territorial Army was doubled and the 4th, 6th and 7th RWF formed duplicate battalions, the 8th, 9th and 10th respectively.​
 
#3
Or, alternatively (and further to the above).

635 and 636 (Royal Welch) Light Anti-Aircraft Regiments were amalgamated in 1955 to become
446 (Royal Welch) Airborne Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment Royal Artillery (TA).
Like its counterpart, 629 Airborne Light Regiment RA TA, its airborne service was short-lived and in 1956 it reverted to an infantry role, re-designated the 6th/7th Battalion The Royal Welch Fusiliers (TA).
 
#4
They certainly had some epic regimental titles in those days!

Reminds me of the anecdotes about the problems encountered when the Allied staffs were formed for the planning of D Day: the US staff found it near impossible to understand or remember the complex titles and acronyms of some Commonwealth regiments.
 
#6
Outstanding, thanks. Wonder where I was going wrong? What animal were they then Para,RWF or RA? No wonder they disbanded!
I think the second result is the more likely one, so I imagine they were mostly RWF-RA, with the Para side only coming in in their last years.
 
#7
I think the second result is the more likely one, so I imagine they were mostly RWF-RA, with the Para side only coming in in their last years.
Again many thanks. I wonder how many other obscure long forgotten units were pepperd accros the UK?
 
#8
I believe they were badged RA but retained some RWF dress distinctions: flash, hackle etc. There's a scouse TA battery that still retains its Liverpool Irish dress distinctions. I was very much WTF? when I first encountered them several years ago: caubeen, wierd hackle and RA capbadge.
 
#10
OK, couldn't wait until tomorrow, your Grandad was in either 635 Light Anti-Aircraft Regt RA (Royal welch) (TA) or 636 Light Anti-Aircraft Regt RA (Royal welch) (TA). Both came into existence in 1947 and amalgametd in 1955 to form 446 (Royal Welch) Airborne) LAA Regt RA (TA). both Regts wore the Royal Welch Fusiliers black five ribboned flash on No. 1 Dress and Battledress. They also wore RWF cap badges and buttons. 446 converted to Infantry in 1956.

Phil
 
#11
Much appreciated Op Ack, certainly seems like an AdHoc/War nessecity unit, I did hear about when he went to fetch a new "Billy" mascot, so I suppose it would've been heavily influenced by RWF traditions.
As I said befroe he was a PSI and had the keys to the Gun Shed as Mam called it, were he would take kids (all so innocent in them days) for rides on the Bofors, he was RE Armoured Farmer in Italy during the 39/45 ruckus (435 Field Park Sqn if I remember correctly) he also had embarasingly high standards to which his RSM would stop at nothing to trip him up, he even went as far as being carried onto the Parade Square on a door by his mates so his uniform was flawless!
I'll try dig out some photo's next time I see my Grandmother.
 
#12
my uncle was in the army WAAAAAAAAAAY back in the day, he was with a missile battery im lead to believe all i got to go off is Arcot? bit vague, hes in his late 50's now any guesses?
 
#13
Here you go, Mr47....

36 'Arcot' Missile Bty
19 'Gibralter' Missile Bty
15 Missile Bty

These three Bty's were part of 50 Missile Regt. RA
Check out the 50 Missile website for more info.
 
#14
Not forgetting 51 Kabul Missile Bty
 
#15
Oops.
 
#16
yeah it was 36 thanks a lot pal,
 

BuggerAll

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#17
They certainly had some epic regimental titles in those days!

Reminds me of the anecdotes about the problems encountered when the Allied staffs were formed for the planning of D Day: the US staff found it near impossible to understand or remember the complex titles and acronyms of some Commonwealth regiments.
I'm sure they struggled with the names and acronyms of some Empire countties. First Imperial Japanese Infantry anyone?
 
#18
Here you go, Mr47....

36 'Arcot' Missile Bty
19 'Gibralter' Missile Bty
15 Missile Bty

These three Bty's were part of 50 Missile Regt. RA
Check out the 50 Missile website for more info.
Didn't 50 have some sort of wierd 'infantry' role Battery too? They decided not to rely on Inf providing defence forces, (IIRC the RSignals were to rely TA Inf for defence of its sites (cold war)) so set up a defensive infantry unit full of inf trained gunners who had extra milan, gpmgs and land rovers to cut about in.
 
#19
Yes, The Special Defence Group was a specialist infantry unit unique to 50 Missile Regiment. Its role was to provided ground security for the missile batteries and in particular the Lance missile system. Members of the SDG completed infantry training on courses run both internally by 50 Missile Regiment and externally. The courses covered such areas as infantry tactics, field craft, weapon handling, first aid, and Nuclear Biological and Chemical warfare. There were 3 Special Defence Group Troops in the Regiment, Each missile battery had its own SDG troop of approximately 30 men, with an organisation comparable to that of a standard infantry platoon. Each troop was broken down into 3 sections, with each section consisting of 8 men, commanded by a Bombardier. The Section generally operated from light skinned vehicles such as Land Rovers and had an array of fire power including rifles, light support weapons, machine guns (in both the light and sustained fire roles), mortars and various anti-tank weapons. The three sections came under the command of a Troop Headquarters commanded by a Warrant Officer or a lieutenant who in turn was assisted by a Troop Sergeant.
The Section Commanders and Troop Sergeants attended the Section Commanders and Platoon Sergeants Battle courses run by the school of infantry which encouraged leadership, weapon handling and tactics and were physically demanding.
 
#20
I believe they were badged RA but retained some RWF dress distinctions: flash, hackle etc. There's a scouse TA battery that still retains its Liverpool Irish dress distinctions. I was very much WTF? when I first encountered them several years ago: caubeen, wierd hackle and RA capbadge.
208 Battery of 103 Regiment RA(V)
 
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