Longest Serving?

Next month (November '16) we will bid farewell to two of our old soldiers, originally of 1 QUEEN'S and currently stagging on with 3 PWRR. They'll have given 45 years each. They joined Boy Service on the same day aged 15, joined the 1st Bn together, we're both RSMs at the same time and, just for good measure, share the same birthday!
Are they now LE's or on long service/FTRS? Whatever, a great innings by them both. How is your post treating you?
 
Are they now LE's or on long service/FTRS? Whatever, a great innings by them both. How is your post treating you?
One was commissioned from the Ranks, served as a Quartermaster then joined the TA and rose to the rank of Major. The other peaked at WO1 which, given his rather colourful past, was pretty bloody outstanding. He stepped back to WO2 to serve as RQMS with the Irregulars. They were both particularly evil Corporals when I joined the Battalion!
 
Not a serving story but..

When I first left school a did an apprenticeship at Taskers Trailers a very old company (now long gone). Lots of older guys there and the one I apprenticed under had been there during the war, reserved occupation. They had a huge steel yard with lots of good skiving places and we used to sit out sometimes in the summer and catch some sun. He told me he often laid back there in ww2 and watched the aircraft and the occasional dog fight. He said that on d day and for a period after huge formations would go over, and that the noise was amazing. Another of the guys there was a Lancaster tail gunner.
 

exspy

LE
I recall posting on another forum the story of a British soldier who enlisted prior to 1900 and served until 1950. He was 70-ish when he finally retired from his position as a storeman at his regimental depot. The interesting thing was that he was a Lance-Corporal and had good conduct chevrons going up his left sleeve past the elbow. I was able to find a photo of him in battledress. I recall he was either KOYLI or KSLI.

Think I can find it now? Not a chance.
 

exspy

LE
Found it. Private Arthur Carter, King's Shropshire Light Infantry, served from 1901 to 1951.
"Private Arthur (Nick) Carter served in the KSLI for 50 years from 1901-1951. He saw active service during the Boer War in South Africa and also in France during the First World War. On his left arm he is wearing ten good conduct stripes, the most ever awarded to anyone in the British Army. When he was discharged in 1951 he was the oldest serving soldier and had remained a private soldier from his own choice."
Talking to Private Carter is the Earl of Povis, who was Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire. To his left is Major General Grover, and on the far right is Lt. Col. Shaw-Ball. After Private Carter was discharged, he lived in a rented room opposite his old Barracks.
 

simbo

LE
A friend of mine back in Canada has been associated with his Bn for nearly 40 years if one includes Cadets. he was also the youngest recognised person to do the Canadian Jumps Course IIRC. he is scheduled to take over as RSM next April. He even served as RSS within the Bn (Permanent staff) whilst a member of the PPCLI.
 
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Found it. Private Arthur Carter, King's Shropshire Light Infantry, served from 1901 to 1951.
"Private Arthur (Nick) Carter served in the KSLI for 50 years from 1901-1951. He saw active service during the Boer War in South Africa and also in France during the First World War. On his left arm he is wearing ten good conduct stripes, the most ever awarded to anyone in the British Army. When he was discharged in 1951 he was the oldest serving soldier and had remained a private soldier from his own choice."
Talking to Private Carter is the Earl of Povis, who was Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire. To his left is Major General Grover, and on the far right is Lt. Col. Shaw-Ball. After Private Carter was discharged, he lived in a rented room opposite his old Barracks.
Did he get an RSMs pension though?
 
From the horse's mouth.

In Pensioners are Civilians in the best care home in the world, but still just retired civilians. We are all ex army and there is a military ethos in this home. There is no discipline military or otherwise, we are not prisoners, We are retired Ladies and Gentlemen.

Nice to see the comments above from Chris & John, the room inspections and parades that we do are not anything like what we used to do in the army, if they were I`d be on jankers every week.
We used to go for drinks in the hospital with old guys when I was at LONDIST and we used to host the old service corps guys in the mess occasionally. Yes the military ethos was still there, it was just like being on ARRSE!

Does inactive reserve service count? I still get the emails to check I'm still breathing.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
@Ninja_Stoker you’re still technically in aren’t you?

In all seriousness you must be pretty close to being the longest serving man in the RN, not including Prince Phillip.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
We have a gentleman at work, who's still serving, who has the Op Corporate medal with rosette :).
 

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