Long distance hiking.

AT, CDT, PCT, anybody walked them?

Brief summary, these are long distance trails in the U.S.A. Each can take upwards of 5-6 months too complete.
Personaly, I am not planning on doing one anytime soon, but am interested in others experience and stories "from the trail".
Certainly a whole community out there, devoted too this activity. You Tube, web pages. Some very interesting tales from all walks of life. (no pun intended)

SK
 
Don't know if you've ever read A Walk in Woods by Bill Bryson but it's an excellent read about his attempt at the AT, it certainly put it on my bucket list.
 
I read a book about the Applichan trail when I was about 16, and vowed one day I'd do it. I can't remember it's title, possibly as simply as 'hiking the Applichan Trail', that would be 40 years ago. Retire this year and its still on the bucket list.
 

roninxix

War Hero
Have a look at Keith Foskett’s books. He’s done them all including the Camino.

Always makes me slightly jealous reading his books.
 
Don't know if you've ever read A Walk in Woods by Bill Bryson but it's an excellent read about his attempt at the AT, it certainly put it on my bucket list.
Read it many moons ago. Though as a young 20 something I just filed it under "a good read". 20 odd years later and in the midst of planning a small 3 day hike with my teenage son. My wanderust has returned with no sign of it leaving. The thought of getting away from it all has become very appealing.
Mid life crisis maybe! Some blokes get fast sports cars, super fast motorbikes and/or faster women. Right now, I'd rather a light weight pack and disappear of grid for 12 months with the wife and dog.
p.s I am a (semi ;-) ) responsible adult with bills to pay and children raise. So this will not happen any time soon.

SK
 
It's funny, but as a member of the cadets at the time I did it wearing that f**cking green 'cadet cagoule' probably hoping someone might think I was one of those SAS blokes undercover - come on I was 15!
 
Scotland is fantastic! Scenery, great walks and camping opportunities. Sadly it shares the same weather system as the west coast of Norway. Which is where I live. So why do I want to go too the states for long distance hiking?
Too put it bluntly. Here on the west coast of Norway it has rained everyday since the end of November 2019. For the most part, Temperatures have been somewhere between 4-7c. and it can be like that in the Summer. So I want to go some where with a bit more guaranteed warmer climate. Also the AT, PCT and CDT are all on my bucket list .
Hopefully this summer I get up too the Hardanger. :)

SK
 
The continental divide is on my list as an adventure/off road motorcycle trip. It became possible a few years ago when a bunch of mountain bikers decided to do the length in stages mapping and creating GPS files. It starts at the Mexican border and goes all the way up to the border of Canadashire taking a biker a leisurely 10 to 14 days to complete.

I like outdoorsy stuff and camping, but the things that make me wary in the US are the bears and the snakes and the mountain lions and the wolves and the scorpions. So you need to find some pretty good camp locations on your route.

FYI there is also a network of cycle routes, mainly on old railway line beds, that stretches coast to coast, The TransAmerica Trail.
 
Wild by Cheryl Strayed is a really good read about her self discovery whilst walking the PCT. Recommended
 
The continental divide is on my list as an adventure/off road motorcycle trip. It became possible a few years ago when a bunch of mountain bikers decided to do the length in stages mapping and creating GPS files. It starts at the Mexican border and goes all the way up to the border of Canadashire taking a biker a leisurely 10 to 14 days to complete.

I like outdoorsy stuff and camping, but the things that make me wary in the US are the bears and the snakes and the mountain lions and the wolves and the scorpions. So you need to find some pretty good camp locations on your route.

FYI there is also a network of cycle routes, mainly on old railway line beds, that stretches coast to coast, The TransAmerica Trail.
Thanks for that, I now have my 2021 holiday beginning to form in my mind.
 

4(T)

LE
Random question 'cos Arrse is faster and far more erudite than Google;

Would you need a special visa(s) to stay long enough in USA to complete the Appalachian Trail?

Its on my bucket list, although I'm not sure my knees have much mileage remaining.
 
There's a few YouTube channels on the subject too. I watched a few videos by Homemade Wanderlust recently. She has done the AT and the PCT, and has made some decent videos both tips and tricks, and 'on the trail' vlogs.
 
Thanks for that, I now have my 2021 holiday beginning to form in my mind.
Here is a bit more: TransAmerica Trail | Adventure Cycling Route Network.

Anther one to consider (nicer weather & awesome views) is the Pacific Coast Highway from Canada to San Diego. The ideal route is north to south as the wind is then at your back.

 
The continental divide is on my list as an adventure/off road motorcycle trip. It became possible a few years ago when a bunch of mountain bikers decided to do the length in stages mapping and creating GPS files. It starts at the Mexican border and goes all the way up to the border of Canadashire taking a biker a leisurely 10 to 14 days to complete.

I like outdoorsy stuff and camping, but the things that make me wary in the US are the bears and the snakes and the mountain lions and the wolves and the scorpions. So you need to find some pretty good camp locations on your route.

FYI there is also a network of cycle routes, mainly on old railway line beds, that stretches coast to coast, The TransAmerica Trail.
Guy Martin (sort of) took part in the Tour Divide race. His account of it in ones of his many autobiographies was quite interesting.
 
Guy Martin (sort of) took part in the Tour Divide race. His account of it in ones of his many autobiographies was quite interesting.
Just to get a flavour of the Divide, I know it is a motorcycle trip, but it is just to give an idea of the hugeness of it all and the variety of the landscapes.

 
I met a guy who did the Appalacian thing in a backpackers hostel in Arizona.

He had bought himself a nice pair of hiking boots before he set off.
Six months later, he thought that he would chance his arm and take his very knackered boots back to the shop.
The owner took one look, and said what did you do, The appalacians?

On hearing his reply he gave him a new pair.
The old ones are now on the wall of the shop.

Just to clarify, he did actually do the walk and leave the hostel.
 
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