Lonely death of Private Dave Forshaw

Englands Glory.

R.I.P.

I hope his oppos sort out a decent send off, he more than deserves it.
 

johnojohnson

War Hero
The tears were hard to stop. Rest in Peace comrade.

I hope his mother is shown the respect not show to her son and the sentiments expressed here are passed on.

His abilities were overshadowed by what some consider a disability.

JJ
 

medman82

War Hero
3 days ago I was prevented from taking my own life by my wife, I have been seeing a NHS psychologist for 2 years.

The original post stated that INSTEAD OF MAKING OTHER PEOPLE HAPPY he wanted to make himself happy. How many other PTSD sufferers think the same thought ??? I know I do....

My condolences to those left picking up the pieces.

A sad loss of another good life but I wish him well on the other side and hope his peace is restful

medders
 
First post I've read tonight and... bloody hell. I don't usually reply to these in memoriam-type posts, but I'll make an exception this time. RIP lad. You achieved more than I ever did. Bloody tragic it is. :(
 
It takes a special kind of man to fight in a war and to come home!!!

It takes a greater man to fight the war he has in his head and to live in peace.


May Private Dave Forshaw rest in peace.

And because of him many people will live in peace
 
Two tours in one year with four weeks off in between, even Regs don't do that.
RIP, mate, you will be sorely missed by those who loved and knew you.
 

scc970

Old-Salt
medman82 said:
3 days ago I was prevented from taking my own life by my wife, I have been seeing a NHS psychologist for 2 years.

The original post stated that INSTEAD OF MAKING OTHER PEOPLE HAPPY he wanted to make himself happy. How many other PTSD sufferers think the same thought ??? I know I do....

My condolences to those left picking up the pieces.

A sad loss of another good life but I wish him well on the other side and hope his peace is restful

medders
It's been so tempting recently, but I have kids, they and a very good friend are all that keeps me from doing it.
Looking at an old photo album last night and feeling soooo depressed when she came up on yahoo and made me promise to go to bed. Don't know how she knew what was going through my head. All old army photos now burned and irretrievably gone, so I can't fall into that trap again!
 
A tragic loss of life.

We train to fight, train hard, fight easy. Maybe it's time to train from fighting on ops to peace time living. Which for some seems harder than training for war.
 
For anyone in that position. all i can say is think of your kids and think of your mates who served with you and what they will feel because they could not be there to help you.
 
I found civvy street very alienating when I left and was (what I now recognise to be) in the early stages of a nervous breakdown following a serious illness I contracted within a fortnight of leaving. It all happened at once and was too much to take in. So what state this poor lad - and the others of you in a similar position - are in I can only guess at. I can say this though. Don't do it. You don't know what's around the corner. Someone very dear to me killed herself and it is not the way it should be. Don't live in torment and let it worsen by the day. Tell someone. Anyone. Just don't slot yourself.
 

3milesniper

Old-Salt
RIP Pte Forshaw how very very sad
 
BuckFelize said:
I found civvy street very alienating when I left and was (what I now recognise to be) in the early stages of a nervous breakdown following a serious illness I contracted within a fortnight of leaving. It all happened at once and was too much to take in. So what state this poor lad - and the others of you in a similar position - are in I can only guess at. I can say this though. Don't do it. You don't know what's around the corner. Someone very dear to me killed herself and it is not the way it should be. Don't live in torment and let it worsen by the day. Tell someone. Anyone. Just don't slot yourself.
It's not so easy though is it? War experience must be like a hard drug with a long come down. You may hate it at times when you are in it. But then you come back and civvy life which can be so crushingly fcuking dull anyway must be unbearably meaningless for those who have seen and been near death.

More than anyone I imagine the returning soldier must look harder at life here than most others and what they see is hard and real. Big Brother on the box. Adverts telling you to buy crap, because you are worth it. Running around like a blue arrse fly trying to keep up mortgage payments on a house flogged to you by some slick git in a suit.
Money, money, money, being the be all and end all of life.
The tragedy for the soldier is he joins to get away from the meaningless of life and after so much action will leave to return to civvy life only to find it's fcuking meaninglessness at times amplified and screaming in his ears.
(I wonder how many might very privately think that living a simple life in an Afghan village would sometimes seem more meaningful and soothing than some of the s'hit one has to put up with back here?)

Maybe holding fast to any good quiet moments had in the sand box might help when back here. The returning soldier will at least now know there are other things and other ways of looking at life other than are offered here. And that's a good thing.

Three books that might help a little.
Siegfried Sassoon's 'Memoirs of an Officer'. Jack Kerouac's 'Desolation Angels' and Henry Miller's 'The Air Conditioned Nightmare'.
 

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