London Musings...

It's not that, she was told as a kid that all the ferry's in the SE of our country went to France. So would drive from GY to Penge the long way.
ie, down to the M25 motorway, over the QE11 bridge over the Thames more M25, then A20 towards the city to home.
Ok you are going to have to help me the meanings of the M and A series type roads.
I assume M is for motorway?
 
Ok you are going to have to help me the meanings of the M and A series type roads.
I assume M is for motorway?
Yes, M is a Freeway, A is a US, quite often dual carriageway.

B is State\ county and C is Parish.

Give or take.
 
Ok you are going to have to help me the meanings of the M and A series type roads.
I assume M is for motorway?

Correct on the M designation, motorways,... A roads are main arterial roads, duel carriage ways, and roads like the North & South circular roads around london. ( A409 ) B roads are usually narrower, and could be one way,, and are in the main suburban, or rural country roads, not usually used as a main through route. Example:- The road linking my village to the next, is the A4124 by reason of its continuation into Wolverhampton, And the Wolverhampton to Birmingham road, in part a duel carriageway, is the A4123.
 
Yes, M is a Freeway, A is a US, quite often dual carriageway.

B is State\ county and C is Parish.

Give or take.
I still distinctly remember this time when I just got here, my first time ever driving on the left side of the road, with me driving for the first time driving an RHD vehicle with a manual, trying to make it to my first day of work just outside London in Essex. The regular A road was closed, and I didn't have a data connection at the time as I only just had gotten a new UK phone contract and it still hadn't activated, only had a Google Maps print out with me so a ton of diversions on increasingly small roads with people hurtling around at almost 60mph.

I literally was sweating my ass off with aircon at full blast while almost shitting myself, saying "don't crash, don't crash..." It was a company car too.

I was bloody lost and went around in circles white knuckling it, for a long ass time before with the help of some strangers and seeing the tiny street names on the zoomed out maps print out, finally figured out where the hell I was and how to get to where I should be.

I will never forget that experience.
 
I still distinctly remember this time when I just got here, my first time ever driving on the left side of the road, with me driving for the first time driving an RHD vehicle with a manual, trying to make it to my first day of work just outside London in Essex. The regular A road was closed, and I didn't have a data connection at the time as I only just had gotten a new UK phone contract and it still hadn't activated, only had a Google Maps print out with me so a ton of diversions on increasingly small roads with people hurtling around at almost 60mph.

I literally was sweating my ass off with aircon at full blast while almost shitting myself, saying "don't crash, don't crash..." It was a company car too.

I was bloody lost and went around in circles white knuckling it, for a long ass time before with the help of some strangers and seeing the tiny street names on the zoomed out maps print out, finally figured out where the hell I was and how to get to where I should be.

I will never forget that experience.
Any professional driver, will tell you, no matter what country, always buy the best road map you can afford. As you found out Red, a printout will help, but only help so far. Especially, when you have to take a detour and run off the map.
When I first drove in Oz, I couldn't get over the size of the place. Satnavs were in their infancy and prohibatly expensive. What helped me was the comprehensive map reading training, given by the British Army.
 
Any professional driver, will tell you, no matter what country, always buy the best road map you can afford. As you found out Red, a printout will help, but only help so far. Especially, when you have to take a detour and run off the map.
When I first drove in Oz, I couldn't get over the size of the place. Satnavs were in their infancy and prohibatly expensive. What helped me was the comprehensive map reading training, given by the British Army.
I did buy one of those yellow AA roadmaps of the UK that very same day in Tesco! I gave it away after a year or so later to a friend, as I barely used it as by that time I already had reliable data connection, satnav etc. Plus, I hardly ever drove in the UK, so it was just sitting around gathering dust.

I don't even use the satnav I bought at the time - probably the last time I used it was in 2013.

Now it's all Google Maps or more likely City Mapper.
 
I did buy one of those yellow AA roadmaps of the UK that very same day in Tesco! I gave it away after a year or so later to a friend, as I barely used it as by that time I already had reliable data connection, satnav etc. Plus, I hardly ever drove in the UK, so it was just sitting around gathering dust.

I don't even use the satnav I bought at the time - probably the last time I used it was in 2013.

Now it's all Google Maps or more likely City Mapper.
Get you Satnav up dated, there are times you won't be able to get a phone signal. Satnavs far more reliable.
 
Err, why not just download the UK map to your phone? It updates automatically when you’re on WiFi anyway.

I’m surprised stand alone satnavs are still bought in this day and age.
That's what I do now, before I head of to any place completely unknown. You can download whole continents/ countries, or bits of them as and when you need them. Saved my bacon plenty of times when I traveled/ backpacked. Offline maps are amazing.
 
Err, why not just download the UK map to your phone? It updates automatically when you’re on WiFi anyway.

I’m surprised stand alone satnavs are still bought in this day and age.
Of course they are, phones screens, are just too small to use in a truck. Got to be far enough away so you won't be tempted to fiddle with it but big enough to see. Not everyone likes to hear, someone telling you you've missed your turning and to turn around.
My Truckers TomTom is set to silent and is on two dimension, so it looks like a road map from a book.
 
Of course they are, phones screens, are just too small to use in a truck. Got to be far enough away so you won't be tempted to fiddle with it but big enough to see. Not everyone likes to hear, someone telling you you've missed your turning and to turn around.
My Truckers TomTom is set to silent and is on two dimension, so it looks like a road map from a book.
Well enjoy it while you can because with sales declining I’d guess they won’t be around or supported for too much longer: End of the road for Sat Navs - as John Lewis removes them from its shelves

My phone nav runs through the car screen so I don’t have the screen size problem you describe, although that was the reason I used a stand alone device a few years ago before phones got up to a decent size. I also have it on silent all the time - the spoken directions are just too irritating. The big difference for me now is that the live traffic on Google and Waze, and the re-routing on the fly, are so much better than Tom-Tom used to be that I wouldn’t be happy to go back to it.
 
Of course they are, phones screens, are just too small to use in a truck. Got to be far enough away so you won't be tempted to fiddle with it but big enough to see. Not everyone likes to hear, someone telling you you've missed your turning and to turn around.
My Truckers TomTom is set to silent and is on two dimension, so it looks like a road map from a book.
Fair enough, but some of the recent in-car/truck screen sizes are humongous! With even multiple digital displays - the center console - the gauges which also display satnav - and a lower between the seat displays.

 
Well enjoy it while you can because with sales declining I’d guess they won’t be around or supported for too much longer: End of the road for Sat Navs - as John Lewis removes them from its shelves

My phone nav runs through the car screen so I don’t have the screen size problem you describe, although that was the reason I used a stand alone device a few years ago before phones got up to a decent size. I also have it on silent all the time - the spoken directions are just too irritating. The big difference for me now is that the live traffic on Google and Waze, and the re-routing on the fly, are so much better than Tom-Tom used to be that I wouldn’t be happy to go back to it.
Mine is a Truckers one, I use it in an artic, my van and on my motorbike and it has settings for different size loads and vehical sizes. You can't guarantee to get a WiFi or a phone signal in this country all the time, but you will with a Satnav (except tunnels etc)
 
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