Location Identifiers - Map Making Kit

Discussion in 'The Training Wing' started by Antonio, Jul 12, 2006.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Hi,

    Being a bit of a biff and not having given orders very often. Could someone offer advice on what are the most important signs/cards to have in my Kit,

    Ie,

    RV1

    FRV,

    Thats about all i know and i need to get some made up before i go on a Cse.

    Thanks alot
     
  2. IMHO the best way forward is wipe clean labels and a chinograph pen (and knife). For the labels, I use the plastic garden labels which look like a T with a square bit on top to write on, and a long thin stalk to stick in the ground. This way, I don't get caught out when I need 7 RVs instead of the 6 I prepared, or something random like Objective GOLD or BLUE 2 Beach or whatever!

    Without wishing to get caught up in a model kit discussion (I'm sure there are plenty out there...) I also find that a decent length (couple of metres at least) of a number of different colours of ribbon, plus some chalk, is just about all I need to carry - everything else can usually be found from nature or military kit.
     
  3. I use the dayglow orange card covered on fablon or laminated cut into strips, which i write on and have some spare just in case i need more.

    I have also done some arrows from the same card, North, direction of enemy and as nasch says some coloured ribbon, to signify roads, rivers etc.

    Sparky
     
  4. I use the plastic markers from a garden centre as had been said earlier for features. You can always use the reverse of one you don't need and write on it with an OHP pen.

    I wrote my callsign (fire team etc) markers on high vis card and sellotaped them around plastic (from ammo tins) so they wouldn't blow away.

    I filled two DKP 2 bottles, one green and one blue for linear features. White wool makes good map grids, not forgetting hexy blocks and talc, very useful in low light conditions.

    What I did like was the idea of using toy soldiers for the position of the blokes in the large scale model as reccomended by the DS on my JNCO cadre, Cpl D-- P---, D&D (well before they got amalgamated.)
    Very chip shop we thought but he emphasised that the guys really would take notice of a model soldier, eg machine gunner and orientate themselves better rather than the pieces of card.

    He also put in the scope for humour with some red ribbon for the person who would get shot to emphasise danger areas, very amusing in an O Group.