Local Resilience - Equipment, Stores, and Training

You shouldn't stockpile a lot of consumables - you should have robust and effective call-off contracts that allow you to stock to the required level quickly enough.

Any other solution is throwing money away.
Well then you have to pay private to retain same capacity
 
Well then you have to pay private to retain same capacity.
Call-on contracts are great if the suppliers can readily access the raw materials to manufacture the goods. If not, the only viable solution is stockpiling, with appropriate shelf-life management and turnover.
 
Call-on contracts are great if the suppliers can readily access the raw materials to manufacture the goods. If not, the only viable solution is stockpiling, with appropriate shelf-life management and turnover.
That's where 'robust and effective comes in'....

Naturally you will pay for a service but you will save more in many other ways - infrastructure, manpower, training etc etc. Piling up loads of stuff in your own facilities is often effective - but it is always inefficient and UK plc doesn't have a lot of money right now and after the plague has gone will have even less...
 
But are air ambulances part of resilience or are they there for 'normal' medical emergencies? Given the helicopters being dedicated to the COVID-19 crisis, and the role played by RAF Chinooks during the recent dam threatening to fail up North, could a case be made for a national resilience squadron of helicopters - separate from air ambulances, Police, or SAR?

Who would fund and man it?
Who would fly them?

My experience is RAF & Rescue pilots will fly in all sorts if the cloud base is high enough - air ambulance tend to require far better conditions - not having a pop at the pilots, probably defined by those above.
 

Yokel

LE
That's where 'robust and effective comes in'....

Naturally you will pay for a service but you will save more in many other ways - infrastructure, manpower, training etc etc. Piling up loads of stuff in your own facilities is often effective - but it is always inefficient and UK plc doesn't have a lot of money right now and after the plague has gone will have even less...
Why not try a Kanban like system as opposed to Just In Time - which has been abandoned by manufacturing industry? I also meant things like gloves, aprons, masks, visors - which I assume can be stored for years.

Who would fly them?

My experience is RAF & Rescue pilots will fly in all sorts if the cloud base is high enough - air ambulance tend to require far better conditions - not having a pop at the pilots, probably defined by those above.
Have we got pilots to do their without impacting front line (and training) activities? We have less cabs and less people than a decade ago.
 
Have we got pilots to do their without impacting front line (and training) activities? We have less cabs and less people than a decade ago.
I'm guessing it's how current everyone is on various bits of kit and ability to fly in XX conditions.
 

Yokel

LE
I'm guessing it's how current everyone is on various bits of kit and ability to fly in XX conditions.
That was not what I was asking. Can we use Pumas, Chinooks, Wildcats, and Merlins for MACA to roles without impacting operational capabilities? Operations around the World continue.

What were they replaced with after 2004 when sold off?
Buckets!

A big issue is that HM Forces have far fewer personnel than they did in 2002/2003 where the Firefighters went on strike.
 
That was not what I was asking. Can we use Pumas, Chinooks, Wildcats, and Merlins for MACA to roles without impacting operational capabilities? Operations around the World continue.
I see - no idea. How many do we have?

Then, if we have loads, do we have enough pilots that are current on them anyway?
 
You are Richard Sharp and I claim my £5.....
Nope, they are behind the curve and the angling for money bit was a little low.

If they had pushed out people to local volunteer group or local authorities, rather than be all strategic, it would have helped more.
The easy gaps to fill where they could have made some bones are pretty much gone.

Guess lots of wicked problems left?
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Nope, they are behind the curve and the angling for money bit was a little low.

If they had pushed out people to local volunteer group or local authorities, rather than be all strategic, it would have helped more.
The easy gaps to fill where they could have made some bones are pretty much gone.

Guess lots of wicked problems left?
I'd be surprised if they have the national coord role implied. Volunteering works at a local level where trust is built over a period of time (LRF membership, etc.). To expect to recruit and deploy an army of veterans for deployment across the UK when the local problems will require specific skills, guarantees of service, insurance, HSAW, etc. is a bit aspirational.
 
Call-on contracts are great if the suppliers can readily access the raw materials to manufacture the goods. If not, the only viable solution is stockpiling, with appropriate shelf-life management and turnover.



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Five year life span. If kept in optimum conditions I can't see how that can't be extended.

I can't find why there is a five years life span. Material break down or just simply microbial growth. A bit of research could enhance lifespan. Issue and sell off the old masks at 4yrs and 6 months. To surgical teams and painters, decorators, builders, etc.
 



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Five year life span. If kept in optimum conditions I can't see how that can't be extended.

I can't find why there is a five years life span. Material break down or just simply microbial growth. A bit of research could enhance lifespan. Issue and sell off the old masks at 4yrs and 6 months. To surgical teams and painters, decorators, builders, etc.
If it is related to its CE Mark, then it links to EU product supply law
 
In a previous bout of inconvenience (snow) lots of organisations had Wessex 4x4 listed as their option for getting staff to and from work.

Then it snowed and the organisations found out they were competing for a very finite resource.
Over reliance on Wessex 4x4 came because they would do the patient transport in return for fuel costs only and the Army would charge full day rate costs for the vehicle and driver(treasury rules in place at the time, not discarded until Somerset floods)
 
Why not try a Kanban like system as opposed to Just In Time - which has been abandoned by manufacturing industry? I also meant things like gloves, aprons, masks, visors - which I assume can be stored for years.
Why not? My point is that we shouldn't have warehouses full of stuff when it can be delivered in a more efficient way, thereby delivering the same or better capability at reduced cost. Another problem with stockpiling now is that your threat in 2 or 3 years time will be different and your equipment obsolete and useless. Better to concentrate on assured access to materials and production than grid-referencing yourself.
 
Just trying to understand why sbp thinks they are part of the solution. NB this doesn't make them part of the problem.
CC04 accounts for and incorporates the voluntary sector. If Rubicon do have this capability and already tie in at local levels then great.
The advantage of LRFs and resilience training is to create the relationships and make the introductions that a full blown crisis doesn't allow.
Means people hit the ground running and really proved its worth in the Glos floods where the local LRF had been among the first to roll out IIEM training to Cat 1/2, Vol sector & Mil 18 months before


Given they have 1000 volunteers so far, it wouldn't be unreasonable to assume that those they would normally involve/send to disaster zones are already involved locally and pretty busy.
If you are a volunteer/help others type, you won't have waited for a call from an overseas relief organisation re-gearing in extraordinary times for domestic ops.

Of the 1000, it wouldn't be a surprise if the CEO is having similar thoughts on the quality/state of the volunteers, as some one running one of the recent (ish) Regular Reserve callout test events
 
Why not? My point is that we shouldn't have warehouses full of stuff when it can be delivered in a more efficient way, thereby delivering the same or better capability at reduced cost. Another problem with stockpiling now is that your threat in 2 or 3 years time will be different and your equipment obsolete and useless. Better to concentrate on assured access to materials and production than grid-referencing yourself.
I doubt we'll never need masks, goggles, aprons, suits, gloves and wellies in the future...

Even if COVID-19 never makes a reappearance, ebola has a reoccurring gig in Africa.
 
Why not? My point is that we shouldn't have warehouses full of stuff when it can be delivered in a more efficient way, thereby delivering the same or better capability at reduced cost. Another problem with stockpiling now is that your threat in 2 or 3 years time will be different and your equipment obsolete and useless. Better to concentrate on assured access to materials and production than grid-referencing yourself.
Like not building your supply chain out of China...
 

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