Local Resilience - Equipment, Stores, and Training

Yokel

LE
Recent flooding and other events, including Coronavirud, caused me to start a thread in CA not so long ago but it seems to have been deleted.

The rural area I live in has retained firefighters with fire appliances and community responders, and has lots of local farmers and builders and so on, so I wonder should local communities have stores of things such as generators, lighting, pumps, lifting equipment, vehicles, rescue boats, and so on?

Volunteers could be trained. Terrorism, disease outbreaks, weather related incidents, and transportation and industrial accidents remain events that could hit any part of the country.
 
Recent flooding and other events, including Coronavirud, caused me to start a thread in CA not so long ago but it seems to have been deleted.

The rural area I live in has retained firefighters with fire appliances and community responders, and has lots of local farmers and builders and so on, so I wonder should local communities have stores of things such as generators, lighting, pumps, lifting equipment, vehicles, rescue boats, and so on?

Volunteers could be trained. Terrorism, disease outbreaks, weather related incidents, and transportation and industrial accidents remain events that could hit any part of the country.
Read CC04, go on your local resilience forum website and you'll find that a lot of people are well ahead of the game.
If you still think not, join your local Parish Council and do something about it. Think global, act local etc
 

Yokel

LE
Last time the idea did not meet with much enthusiasm. It should not be too hard to identify people with relevant skills and experience - from practical tasks like setting up pumps and hoses, or driving tractors and lorries, to things like caring for the injured or shocked or operating emergency communications.

Learning practical skills will do everyone good.
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
My last job was covering all the engineering aspects of a massive resilience organisation (massive to the tune of about 100 million quids worth of gear).

The problem with having stores full of kit is that it needs to work when the balloon goes up, otherwise it’s all pointless.

All those generators and vehicles need servicing and running up occasionally, lifting equipment needs to be tested under LOLER, you still need to adhere to H&S regs, a lot of the kit is consumable and has a limited shelf life.

Basically it costs a shit load of money and needs people to look after it all. In the context of where I work, it’s worth spending this money because the consequence of not having it is very very bad.

If it’s millions of pounds worth of taxpayer’s money just to save a few people’s houses from getting flooded out, it’s probably not worth it.

As an aside, I live in an area that gets flooded a lot. Even during storm Desmond everyone pulled together and managed. Every village hall in the area became a resilience store full of kit and food that had been donated.

In the end most of it didn’t even get used. We had tons of have a go heroes rocking up at fire stations with 4x4s offering their services but apart from helping some people move valuables out of trashed houses, there really wasn’t much to do.

If there is money to spend on this sort of thing, I’d rather it just go to bolster our existing emergency services.
 

chimera

LE
Moderator

Most LRFs have a permanent "Third Sector" or "Volunteer Organisations" rep which will include such groups as local 4x4 groups etc so sensible volunteer help can be centrally coordinated.
 

Yokel

LE
I agree that the proper emergency services should get the lion's share of any additional funding, but there must be a role for volunteers. With the current crisis will able and willing volunteers be sought to help in their communities?

Some of us do have skills that could be useful.
 

cymraeg

On ROPS
On ROPs
I agree that the proper emergency services should get the lion's share of any additional funding, but there must be a role for volunteers. With the current crisis will able and willing volunteers be sought to help in their communities?

Some of us do have skills that could be useful.
I've spotted a flaw....
A village local to me is going to have a meeting about whether they want to be on 2 FB groups to coordinate support or even on it all.
Then they might look at doing some preparations..... probably once they've agreed to put that item on an agenda for the next meeting
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Serve On are a great bunch - worth joining if you are a publicly spirited type
 
Another flaw: The ambulance service I work for has ceased CFR operations indefinitely, most the churches have closed, and the community groups that used the town hall are now inactive.

Basically there's sod all going on in terms of community response or resilience in my region, and I'm working alone.

It's bloody demoralising, given all our training and preparation, that our support networks have simply folded at the drop of a hat.
 

Yokel

LE
Very surprised that the U.K. got rid of it’s civil defence ?!
It was at the end of the Cold War and the policians wanted to save money. Since the nuclear threat was thought to be a thing of the past Government was no longer willing to pay for a warning network of sirens and things, bunkers to observe and measure explosions and fall out, and emergency stores of food and equipment.

They forgot about natural disasters, industrial and transport accidents, disruption to the national and international transport system, disease, terrorism...
 
It was at the end of the Cold War and the policians wanted to save money. Since the nuclear threat was thought to be a thing of the past Government was no longer willing to pay for a warning network of sirens and things, bunkers to observe and measure explosions and fall out, and emergency stores of food and equipment.

They forgot about natural disasters, industrial and transport accidents, disruption to the national and international transport system, disease, terrorism...
Yes and no, after 911 the uk spend a shed load of cash on USAR, and mass decon unit also heavy pumping units,
more than half the mass decon units were scrapped, USAR trained teams moved back onto normal posts but on call,alas the heavy pump units have seen the most use,
 

Yokel

LE
There must be empty out of town stores, warehouses, and industrial units all over the country. If some of them had been used to store masks, gloves, and other PPE then how useful would it be now?

The surge in demand for NHS use means suppliers have been unable to supply care homes and carers. With a supply originating many thousands of miles away and a continuing threat of pandemics makes me think that strategic stockpiles were a good idea.

Instead of warehousing big things like plant, we need to stockpile the consumables.
 

Full marks for dogged determination.
Empty space costs someone somewhere something.

Unless you own it.

One reason the defence estate was so big following the war and then the Cold War was for dispersal & resilience (complimentary in this case due to terminal effects of nuclear ballistic missiles).

One reason it is being sold off so rapidly is that costs have risen, new equipment is expensive and our existential enemy isn't quite as scary as they were

Due to a number of standards, any stock of PPE or medicine is subject to something called shelf-life
After it passes that it gets disposed of, I.e the Tami-Flu my then employer sent me in 2009, was well out of date when pathogenic Bird flu was warned about in Jan 2016.

What is needed now is lots of disciplined volunteers who can keep social distancing measures up, fill in for the those who are self isolating for all sorts of reasons and who can bring a raft of other skills.

Do your part
 
There must be empty out of town stores, warehouses, and industrial units all over the country. If some of them had been used to store masks, gloves, and other PPE then how useful would it be now?

The surge in demand for NHS use means suppliers have been unable to supply care homes and carers. With a supply originating many thousands of miles away and a continuing threat of pandemics makes me think that strategic stockpiles were a good idea.

Instead of warehousing big things like plant, we need to stockpile the consumables.
Or not. In the current situation we’d now be listening to doctors and nurses complaining about out of date PPE (in fact some already have). Historically no one has been keen on paying for being prepared for every eventuality, and I doubt that’s something that will change even after this.
 

Just_plain_you

War Hero
What is needed now is lots of disciplined volunteers who can keep social distancing measures up, fill in for the those who are self isolating for all sorts of reasons and who can bring a raft of other skills.
Tesco has just recruited more people in 10 days than the entire size of the AR.

The army are still trying to work out where they all live as they trust neither the data in JPA nor those who entered it.
 
Hence use Rubicon

Keeps Army as a Spearhead/break in case of strategic emergency asset

Let all the UK Vetbros do their stuff and if working locally in public sector after all the budget cuts, it will be appreciated. E2A: also charity, so no dayrates, payment expectations etc

As the Regular Army is now on DC with the Reserves and having such fun... (check out UK Miltwitter....), it would be safe to say that is as good as self isolating!
 

Latest Threads

Top