local recruitment

#1
hi everyone, when i joined 1LI in 93-99, the recruiting staff where always pushing for people to join their local regiment. now having been accepted back at the age of 31, and in torquay,devon, the recruiting staff advised by glasgow(lovely people!!) :frustrated: have given me the choice of 22nd cheshire or pow's own. no mention of the rifles !! seems local recruiting has been forgotten for the sake of plugging gaps.is it now just common practice or am i wrong.cheers!!
 
#2
abpleasebob said:
hi everyone, when i joined 1LI in 93-99, the recruiting staff where always pushing for people to join their local regiment. now having been accepted back at the age of 31, and in torquay,devon, the recruiting staff advised by glasgow(lovely people!!) :frustrated: have given me the choice of 22nd cheshire or pow's own. no mention of the rifles !! seems local recruiting has been forgotten for the sake of plugging gaps.is it now just common practice or am i wrong.cheers!!
I suspect that the pressure is on to fill the gaps, rather than to send recruits to Regiments that do not need them. Sensible, really.

I dare say that if you stood your ground, Glasgow might crack. I wouldn't bet on it, though.

7 years away? You're in for a bit of a shock!

Litotes
 
#3
could you not just say

'let me join the rifles or i won't sign on'

would this work or would the wieners at glasgow risk losing a potential soldier?
 
#4
yeah could do, but easier to transfer once in the system i hope?.. to Litotes , yeah is going to be a bit different from before thank god im still fit, bft or bpfa or what every its called now at 9:15,and im 31, give some of these young uns a run for there money i hope, thanks for the replies!!! :thumright:
 
#5
Good luck mate , you,ll probably beat most of the sprogs in a PFT .

They should let ya transfer across when ya get to batt, your def right about the plugging gaps bit most batts are like mongrels now .
Every Infantry soldier in the front line lives a life compounded of fear, boredom, hunger, thirst, tiredness and cold. The needs of an Infantryman must be carried on his back. His home is a slit trench, which he has dug for himself and which will be his ready-made grave if he is killed. In that short shallow trench, he spends time either waiting to go over the top into an attack or defending himself against enemy assaults. Sentry duty comes round all too frequently and when it does the Infantryman will look out into the darkness of night, trying to determine whether the shadows he sees moving about are shrubbery or the figures of an enemy patrol. Food reaches him erratically and hot food scarcely at all. In some places, to man pack the food from where it is cooked into the front line means hour long marches for the carriers. For water, the Infantryman relies upon local sources or the infrequent, and by god how infrequent, visits of the water truck.

Tank men carry their bedding and supplies with them in their vehicle. There is even space for a few comforts, such as primus stoves and thermos flasks. In winter, tank men are warm inside their steel skin and in summer there are cooling fans. Units of Artillery and Engineers have sufficient transport to carry all the worldly goods to their soldiers, so that the roughest edges are taken off their discomfort. All those other units sleep sound in their sleeping bags or warm blankets, knowing that the front line is manned by vigilant Infantrymen looking out over the parapet of a trench while at the bottom of other slit trenches, their mates try and sleep, wrapped in a single thin blanket, that’s why without the Infantry the Army would not operate .


WRITTEN BY A GERMAN RIFLEMAN
THE EASTERN FRONT, WINTER OF 1941/42
 
#7
kc1982kc said:
Good luck mate , you,ll probably beat most of the sprogs in a PFT .

They should let ya transfer across when ya get to batt, your def right about the plugging gaps bit most batts are like mongrels now .
Every Infantry soldier in the front line lives a life compounded of fear, boredom, hunger, thirst, tiredness and cold. The needs of an Infantryman must be carried on his back. His home is a slit trench, which he has dug for himself and which will be his ready-made grave if he is killed. In that short shallow trench, he spends time either waiting to go over the top into an attack or defending himself against enemy assaults. Sentry duty comes round all too frequently and when it does the Infantryman will look out into the darkness of night, trying to determine whether the shadows he sees moving about are shrubbery or the figures of an enemy patrol. Food reaches him erratically and hot food scarcely at all. In some places, to man pack the food from where it is cooked into the front line means hour long marches for the carriers. For water, the Infantryman relies upon local sources or the infrequent, and by god how infrequent, visits of the water truck.

Tank men carry their bedding and supplies with them in their vehicle. There is even space for a few comforts, such as primus stoves and thermos flasks. In winter, tank men are warm inside their steel skin and in summer there are cooling fans. Units of Artillery and Engineers have sufficient transport to carry all the worldly goods to their soldiers, so that the roughest edges are taken off their discomfort. All those other units sleep sound in their sleeping bags or warm blankets, knowing that the front line is manned by vigilant Infantrymen looking out over the parapet of a trench while at the bottom of other slit trenches, their mates try and sleep, wrapped in a single thin blanket, that’s why without the Infantry the Army would not operate .


WRITTEN BY A GERMAN RIFLEMAN
THE EASTERN FRONT, WINTER OF 1941/42
The whole Truth and nothing but the Truth...
 
#8
Every Infantry soldier in the front line lives a life compounded of fear, boredom, hunger, thirst, tiredness and cold. The needs of an Infantryman must be carried on his back. His home is a slit trench, which he has dug for himself and which will be his ready-made grave if he is killed. In that short shallow trench, he spends time either waiting to go over the top into an attack or defending himself against enemy assaults. Sentry duty comes round all too frequently and when it does the Infantryman will look out into the darkness of night, trying to determine whether the shadows he sees moving about are shrubbery or the figures of an enemy patrol. Food reaches him erratically and hot food scarcely at all. In some places, to man pack the food from where it is cooked into the front line means hour long marches for the carriers. For water, the Infantryman relies upon local sources or the infrequent, and by god how infrequent, visits of the water truck.

Tank men carry their bedding and supplies with them in their vehicle. There is even space for a few comforts, such as primus stoves and thermos flasks. In winter, tank men are warm inside their steel skin and in summer there are cooling fans. Units of Artillery and Engineers have sufficient transport to carry all the worldly goods to their soldiers, so that the roughest edges are taken off their discomfort. All those other units sleep sound in their sleeping bags or warm blankets, knowing that the front line is manned by vigilant Infantrymen looking out over the parapet of a trench while at the bottom of other slit trenches, their mates try and sleep, wrapped in a single thin blanket, that’s why without the Infantry the Army would not operate .


WRITTEN BY A GERMAN RIFLEMAN
THE EASTERN FRONT, WINTER OF 1941/42
first time i have actually agreed with a german
 

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