Living Standards 'Worst since the War'

#1
So says the BBCs latest headline. I was born in 1957 and I can assure all and sundry that nowadays people in UK don't know what poverty is. The difference between now and my childhood is absolutely staggering. Worst since the war my fucking arse! Wankers!

"This has, for sure, been the worst decade for living standards certainly since the last war and probably since the 1920s," said Paul Johnson, director of the IFS.

Autumn Statement: Workers' pay growth prospects dreadful, says IFS - BBC News
 
#2
I was born in 1944, rationing was in full swing, outside Karsies, tin bath in front of the fire, no TV, pubs restricted in serving only what was available. As a kiddy a couple of years later my rations for a week could be put in a saucer, for an adult, on a dinner plate. Heavy coats on the bed as blankets couldn't be had. No dole, paid for medical care and doctors' visits. Feckin' BBC! :cool:
 
#3
Very few people had a car, same with phones, if someone had one all the neighbours would ask to use it. No central heating, no double glazing, no brand new furniture when you just got married you were very happy to have hand me downs, no expectation that you would ever afford to buy your own place. make n mend on clothing hand me downs through families, if you were rich you might get a new pair of shoes. Bikes assembled from bits n pieces, although I knew a kid who got a new chopper for Xmas. But he let us all have a go.
Better shut up now. B@stards!
 
#4
I was born in 1944, rationing was in full swing, outside Karsies, tin bath in front of the fire, no TV, pubs restricted in serving only what was available. As a kiddy a couple of years later my rations for a week could be put in a saucer, for an adult, on a dinner plate. Heavy coats on the bed as blankets couldn't be had. No dole, paid for medical care and doctors' visits. Feckin' BBC! :cool:
 
#5
I'll wager someone had to live in a carboard box in the middle of the motorway.

One of our Yorkshire members, no doubt.
 
#7
I was born in 1954 and stayed with my Granny whilst mum and dad went out to work. Breakfast was toast. Lunch was a big bowl of soup made with a butchers bone and dinner was meat and vegetables from grand-dads garden - which he tended after working all day as moulder in an iron foundry.

This Paul Johnson (economist) - Wikipedia would not know about working if he was given a shovel. Another member of the intelligentsia who is so sure of his own views everybody else is just a pleb. Did I mention I don't like him or his type?
 
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#8
I as born in 1954 and stayed with my Granny whilst mum and dad went out to work. Breakfast was toast. Lunch was a big bowl of soup made with a butchers bone and dinner was meat and vegetables from grand-dads garden - which he tended after working all day as moulder in an iron foundry.

This Paul Johnson (economist) - Wikipedia would not know about working if he was given a shovel. Another member of the intelligentsia who is so sure of his own views everybody else is just a pleb. Did I mention I don't like him or his type?
Paul Johnson lives here:

Highgate (/ˈhaɪɡeɪt/ or /ˈhaɪɡᵻt/) is a suburban area of north London at the north-eastern corner of Hampstead Heath, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) north north-west of Charing Cross.


Highgate is one of the most expensive London suburbs in which to live.[2] It has an active conservation body, the Highgate Society, to protect its character.


You are quite right - wtf does he know about poverty... :rolleyes:
 
#9
Ambiguous figures in the hands of so called experts can say any thing, the western world is experiencing very low wage increases if not stagnation. Throw in inflation and very little increase is being felt any where.

This is not restricted to the UK and the so called experts know it, yet will use disinformation as a stick to beat the present government.
 
#10
Yup, wearing an overcoat in the living room in winter because the coal fire only heated a small patch around the fire itself.
Ice on the inside of the windows.
Stiff as board sheets (and I wasn't old enough for that reason) which took 5 minutes to heat up.
Chocolate/sweets and presents at Christmas/birthdays only.
No TV. No record player. No possibility of a car.
Moved from Folkestone to Swindon sitting on the dropped tail of the removal van.
But we were happy.
And we were.
We only had to worry about nuclear annihilation as a possibility, the poor snowflakes have Brexit to worry about.
 
#11
Born 1940 ,agree with previous posts, the black market was life saver if it could be afforded, we couldn't but I knew a mate who's dad was what we called then a spiv , hard sometimes but we still had a laugh.
 
#12
"This has, for sure, been the worst decade for living standards certainly since the last war and probably since the 1920s,"
Possibly the most stupid statement from anyone in a public position since Diane Abbot last spoke. I do hope that he gets pulled up severely for it; that it comes from the Director of the IFS is astonishing.
 
#14
My parents were married in 1949. They (later with me) lived with my mother's parents until 1956 'cos there wasn't anywhere else to live - outside crapper, no central heating, tin bath etc. Our first council house was a luxury, but still no central heating and linoleum on the floor - that's what we need for Olympic sprint training.

We didn't go abroad on holiday, only to my uncle's (council rented) farm and an auntie's cottage in west Wales - four buses each way to the latter, what car?

The arrogant tw*t who wrote the article doesn't know what life's like. They've probably closed his local Costa shop nd he's sulking.
 
#15
I was born in 1954 and stayed with my Granny whilst mum and dad went out to work. Breakfast was toast. Lunch was a big bowl of soup made with a butchers bone and dinner was meat and vegetables from grand-dads garden - which he tended after working all day as moulder in an iron foundry.

This Paul Johnson (economist) - Wikipedia would not know about working if he was given a shovel. Another member of the intelligentsia who is so sure of his own views everybody else is just a pleb. Did I mention I don't like him or his type?

That description of soup made me feel hungry :)

I grew up eating stew that sounded similar to that. I still make it now as a 'treat' and its bloody lovely :)
 
#16
He could be on to something; I can't remember the last time it was so hard to find a nanny, some quinoa and a decent pair of ironic spectacles using just my ipad and expense account.

I blame Brexit.
 
#17
That description of soup made me feel hungry :)

I grew up eating stew that sounded similar to that. I still make it now as a 'treat' and its bloody lovely :)
Oh aye and it never goes away. As a sweaty of a certain age you can feed me that stuff for lunch and dinner and I'll be happy. When I go home I make loads of it and put it in the freezer for my mum to defrost and microwave. As a special treat I'll make her mince with links in it and a beef olive per portion. Add vegetable and some diced tatties and she is over the moon. Feck I'm hungry now. :)

The tuat from the IFS probably thinks beef olives grown on trees in Tuscany.
 
#20
If we are rubbishing the idea that we are as poor as in a bygone age ill throw in another 'line' that really winds me up.

Its when some social commentator says how 'we all have such busy lives these days'

I cant help thinking that when people worked 12 hours whifts six days per week, then had church on Sunday with the only days off being bank holidays they had a tad less free time. Of course that free time was taken up washing clothes by hand, then putting them through the mangle, drying them on the line then starching them. Oh, and turning the heating on consisted of making a fire in the hearth and waiting for it to get going.
Oh, and the icing on the cake was walking or cycling to work.
 

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