Living Outside the UK

#1
OK - so everybody where I am based states that they do not want to return to UK, so if you have settled outside, where?? And what experiences can you share for your resettlement?

I plan to move to Denmark, so anybody who has done similar let us know how you got on!
 
#3
SKJOLD's the bloke for you to talk to, BS. He lives in those climes, I believe (maybe more northwards, but they all talk like the Swedish Chef up there.)
Me, I go where my free heart and vicious wife tell me to go. County Down.
 
#4
bullshit said:
OK - so everybody where I am based states that they do not want to return to UK, so if you have settled outside, where?? And what experiences can you share for your resettlement?

I plan to move to Denmark, so anybody who has done similar let us know how you got on!
Save up - lots of money - mind you with your wife being very well qualified you could become a house husband :twisted:
 
#5
I moved to the USA on retiring from the army. Lot of job opportunities though most require a degree of some sort. Work ethic is slightly different here, efficiency is often equated to how many hours one works rather than how quickly one can get the job done. Time off (vacations etc.) is not as generous as in the UK though I think the financial rewards are greater.

House in the country, couple of BMWs, boat etc., lifestyle easier to attain here than in the UK. Downside is the cost of medical insurance if one's firm doesn't provide it (though most do), it's damn expensive. All in all a good country to live in though I do miss the UK even after twenty some years.
 
#6
I've Hong Kong, Dubai - both great fun, lower tax and high quality of life . I love the UK - It's a great place to visit in the summer !
 
#7
I live in NZ, moved herein feb this year, due to work,

Advice, make sure you get a job before you gethere, and take a relocations agent, its well worth it. It might seem ceap to begin with, bt watch there tax's, as they charge on world wide tax, rather than justwhat you have earnt in that country.

Country side is stunning, and the natives very friendly, Although a lot of japs over here, and they are mostly arrogant.

Weather similar to the UK, but no snow the higher you go on north island.

Population is about 4 million in total,

Advice if you do come down here and see moari dancing dont walk away, as they take it as a massive insult!

Any more advice needed please ask.
 
#8
I moved to Germany when I left the Regiment, mostly because I married a German girl during my posting there, and the job scene in Cornwall was nil.

The hardest thing was learning the German language, and as I work in security with mixed police teams, I had to learn German Law, written and verbal, what a nightmare that was!

But if you can get through all that, it can be a nice place. Although they screwed me with my service pension, I will get taxed in the UK AND again in Germany! :cry:

On the plus side, I am always bumping into ex-pats, as there are over 40 thousand in Germany.

Cheers, Bill.
 
#9
Bodmin-Bill,

You should talk to a lawyer, as I believe that double taxation is illegal within the EU.

I may be wrong, but it might be worth looking into.
 
#11
I did live in Norway for 1 year and that was the quickest way of getting rid of a bucket load of cash I know of! Seriously expensive. Now, I'm a resident in Dubai and I have been out of the UK, mainly in the Middle East, for the past 5 years. Money's good, no tax and I have time to spend with my wife, either exploring the desert or vegging together at home. Makes a big difference. Tax is always good for a debate. If you register with the tax office as NR (Non Resident), as I did in 2000, and end up working for a UK-based firm, you only have 30 days a year to be in the UK tax free. After that, they tax you for the entire year. Check that one out as it may have changed. Either way, have fun doing what you want to do.
 
#12
Bodmin-Bill said:
I moved to Germany when I left the Regiment, mostly because I married a German girl during my posting there, and the job scene in Cornwall was nil.

The hardest thing was learning the German language, and as I work in security with mixed police teams, I had to learn German Law, written and verbal, what a nightmare that was!

But if you can get through all that, it can be a nice place. Although they screwed me with my service pension, I will get taxed in the UK AND again in Germany! :cry:

On the plus side, I am always bumping into ex-pats, as there are over 40 thousand in Germany.

Cheers, Bill.
Have posted this somewhere else but thought it might bear a repeat in here.
Heres a quick heads up for anyone getting out in Germany.

DON'T tell anyone about your Terminal Grant/Pension.

I am fighting the Boxhead tax authoritie cnuts in the courts at the moment as they want to tax me.

I have had to pay a sort of tax on my pension as it is "unearned" income which is stuck on top of my pay but they are trying to get me to pay full income tax on the rest of it as well despite this being disallowed under the UK/D Double taxation agreement.

I should win but the paperwork and heart ache is a bitch.

So if you get out in Germany keep those payments to yourself...

I wish someone had warned me about this before I got out.

Oh and if you are wondering why I told them it was because I was threatened with a tax audit when I bought my house..
 
#13
I would be grateful if you could keep me informed of your progress, as I am in the same boat. And I only told people about my service pension because I had to before I bought my house. :(

Cheers, Bill.
 
#14
You will probably have to pay the Progessionsvorbehalt on your pension.
This is the way they get round the treaty without breaking it :(

What they do is they add your pension to your yearly pay and then use this sum to calculate your personal allowances/rate of tax and they then use this rate on your actuall income. Not on the pension part of it !!

The result is that you end up paying more tax than before.

It is theoretically possible that you wouldn't pay anymore tax but if you are earning even a moderately normal wage then the sods will take money off you.

Oh BTW Bill have you made sure that you are being taxed at the lowest possible rate in the UK? I pay something like £60 a year in tax on my pension in the UK.

I am fighting the Boxhead wnakers 'cos they are trying to get me to pay the full income tax on my terminal grant and commutation, that would be about 5 times the amount of the Progressionsvorbeblah and they ain't getting my dosh..... I hope :(

Court case goes ahead in the next couple of weeks.
I would ask anyone who actually gives a fcuk to keep your extremities crossed for me.
 
#16
Not sure if this has been posted before but if you are an ex-pat you can have a do-it-yourself care package of all those little things that you can't get hold of in whatever corner of the world you are living in.

They send the stuff anywhere (for money of course :))

British corner shop
 
#17
Thailand for 2.5 years and Singapore for 1.5 years and counting. With the tax rate as it stands (this year I've paid 6.7%) we'll be staying here for as long as the work lasts!

Aside from that S'pore is a great place to live - minimal crime, no chavs and a place where with a young family you can't help but feel safe.

lancslad
 
#18
After leaving the Army managed 5 years in London. Constantly whined about the traffic, the pollution, the cost, Gordon B'Stad Brown etc. etc.

Put my money where my mouth was last year and am now in Muscat, Oman. Its only been a year so far, but the quality of life is well worth the move. Great place.
 
#19
Milton said:
I did live in Norway for 1 year and that was the quickest way of getting rid of a bucket load of cash I know of! Seriously expensive. Now, I'm a resident in Dubai and I have been out of the UK, mainly in the Middle East, for the past 5 years. Money's good, no tax and I have time to spend with my wife, either exploring the desert or vegging together at home. Makes a big difference. Tax is always good for a debate. If you register with the tax office as NR (Non Resident), as I did in 2000, and end up working for a UK-based firm, you only have 30 days a year to be in the UK tax free. After that, they tax you for the entire year. Check that one out as it may have changed. Either way, have fun doing what you want to do.
Interesting, I've lived in Norway 7 years now and i can honestly say that my standard of living is better than it was back in blighty. Sure we get taxed into the deck (36% income tax for me, VAT is at 25%) but wages seem to balance it out. If you get sick or have a kid then you could hardly wish for a better country, paternity leave is (iirc) a minimum of 4 weeks paid, that's mandatory, you and the missus can actually split 10 months off with pay between you or 12 months at 80% pay.
Holidays are 5 weeks across the board plus national holidays.

Another good thing is the way they do holiday money (this is a national thing not an employer thing) June wages are almost double the regular monthly wage, the wages before xmas you only pay half income tax on too. Water and sewage are also baked into our version of the community charge and cost less than the UK iirc.

Housing is probably also cheaper on average although i live in the town with the highest increase in housing prices in Norway in recent years (but we bought ours before it took off...sweet ). Of course if you want to live out in the sticks then housing is dirt cheap.


I also get to hunt, fish and keep guns, not to mention walk and camp where i like.
 
#20
I travelled a little since I got out:

1) Romania - cheap as chips, but goes stale just as quick. Crime. Crime. Crime. Don't raise your kids there.
2) Italy - don't f**king bother they hate foreigners and the country's an admin nightmare.
3) Holland - everyone speaks english, expats get a 30% tax break. OK so far...
 

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