Linux, eh? what you on about

I'm only in the office typically 2 days per week and I really don't want to leave the machine on and unattended for 3-5 days at a time. Hence the bl**dy thing will do its' best to install updates when I'm in the office and trying to do some work.

As for Linus I carry a Thunderbird Stick [think International Rescue] so that if Windoze eve goes fully titsup I can boot from the stick and recover my data files. Useful if you're in the middle of nowhere as once happened to me when Windoze crashed due to a faulty screen driver and I needed to access work files and do a presentation to a client.

They were quite impressed that I could boot up in this way and their IT bod then sorted my laptop out for me.
 

Azul_R

Clanker
Wasn't it SCO Caldera who bought rights to bits of Unix or a single flavour or something, then ruled that they owned all of it and tried to demand licence fees from, well just about everybody? We at IBM had an SCO Caldera watch on the news as they threatened multi-billion lawsuits against all and sundry. IBM just sat back and said, "Go on then."

I couldn't remember the name until you mentioned SCO.
The origins were a lot more complicated, and I'd shifted into networking for the boom of the late Nineties and the bust of the early Two Thousands so didn't really follow the lawsuits and the eventual denouement.

It's all part of the Unix Wars, as complex and archaic as the Wars of the Roses. SCO had a license from AT&T and after Xenix they developed their own Unix V.3 version for the PC, called OpenServer. In the meantime, AT&T sold their Unix division to Novell, which later sold in on to SCO, reserving some rights along the way. SCO thus had control of Unix V.4 and entree into a much higher echelon of industry politics than normal for a company of its relatively small size. Along the way was a failed project with IBM and others to get a latest and greatest single Unix. I think it was from the ashes of this project that the flimsy justification for the lawsuit came about.

That was all what I think of as the "old SCO". Like most of the other direct competitors it wasn't doing well commercially and Caldera bought them out with other people's money. "New SCO" was a gutted version of old SCO with the Caldera folk very much in charge, but Caldera also couldn't make a go of it, and my guess is that the lawsuit was more out of desperation than calculated intent.
 
Wasn't it SCO Caldera who bought rights to bits of Unix or a single flavour or something, then ruled that they owned all of it and tried to demand licence fees from, well just about everybody? We at IBM had an SCO Caldera watch on the news as they threatened multi-billion lawsuits against all and sundry. IBM just sat back and said, "Go on then."

I couldn't remember the name until you mentioned SCO.
SCO sold their Unix business to Caldera, who were an early but unprofitable Linux distributor (I think I've still got one of their CDs somewhere). The original SCO then ended up getting bought by Sun, who I believe wanted their remaining application software, and the original SCO no longer had any relevance in this.

Caldera then renamed themselves SCO. The original SCO had a partnership with IBM to come out with a new version of Unix, but there was a clause in it which said that IBM could terminate the agreement if SCO changed hands. IBM saw the writing on the wall with respect to proprietary unix (Linux was going to take over the market), and took the opportunity to bail out of the agreement.

SCO's (the new version, which I'll just refer to as SCO from this point on) sales plan was to use their newly aquired sales channels to push Caldera Linux to the SCO unix (Openserver) customer base. That customer base included a lot of small companies in things like car dealerships, restaurants, hotels, and the like, who used it to run vertical business applications (basically, software that runs a specific business niche).

That was a great plan, but it had a flaw. Caldera/SCO's own Linux was crap, and their customer service was very poor. Red Hat on the other hand was very good and gave good customer service, and a lot of the SCO local distributors and software vendors (IT consultants who got paid to set up and maintain systems for local customers) were already selling Red Hat. These third parties dropped SCO's product line, and the company found its newly acquired customer base rapidly melting away.

SCO then got a new CEO, who hit on the brilliant plan of going full on "American" - that is suing everyone in sight - over bullshit claims in hopes of getting paid off to go away. Their main target was IBM, over the termination of their partnership. They slung all sorts of mud at IBM, but none if it stuck. As part of this SCO made various bogus copyright claims about Linux, all of which were proven to be false. SCO told IBM that for a mere half a billion though, all of this could be made to go away. IBM told SCO to ram it, and kept fighting them in court.

SCO also went on to sue loads of other people in order to make a nuisance of themselves while angling for a payoff from IBM. One typical one was that they had a sideline in doing administration work for Novell, who were the ones who actually owned the original copyrights to Unix, having bought them from AT&T. SCO would collect licensing fees from various customers and forward them to Novell in return for a commission. One of their old customers was Chrysler who had a set of Cray supercomputers running a version of Unix called Unixware. These machines were long gone, but the original contract said that Chrysler had to report the serial numbers of the CPU units running Unixware annually. SCO sent a demand to Chrysler to report the serial numbers as per contract. Chrysler returned a statement saying "none". SCO then sued Chrysler on the grounds that "none" was not a serial number. The judge handed SCO their arse, but SCO released a press statement declaring themselves vindicated.

Novell was not amused at all this and issued a cease and desist to SCO with regards to launching lawsuits on Novell's behalf. SCO responded by suing Novell. This did not go well for SCO. Meanwhile SCO's lawsuits against IBM were similarly unsuccessful.

This sort of thing went on until SCO ran out of money. Certain executives at the company still managed to walk away with millions of dollars of the shareholders' money while their shareholders, suppliers, and long suffering business partners got nothing but unpaid bills.

While all this was going on much of the IT press was going "WTF?", if they were paying attention at all. There was however always a cheerleading section who were saying how SCO was right, how they were going to take IBM to the cleaners, and how Linux was going to be killed off. After SCO declared bankruptcy their accounts were made public so that creditors could claim against the assets, and it turned out that SCO was paying off certain people in the IT press (and still owed them money!).

Lawyers on this scale were expensive and SCO needed money to continue. Microsoft funnelled somewhere between 50 and 100 million to them via various backdoor channels just to keep the lawsuits going as they still had dreams of killing off Linux. All of this came out however when they stiffed the guy who was laundering the money for them on his commission, and he leaked the emails outlining the plan. The whole suicidal lawsuit scheme would not have been possible without under the table financing from Microsoft .

Microsoft were always doing various shady crap like this while the company was run by Bill Gates and later, Steve Balmer. This is a major part of why the company was so roundly despised by much of the rest of the IT industry and by professionals working in the field (aside from their crappy products). That has started to slowly change as the company has come under new management, but memories are long and the reputation still lingers.
 
Last edited:
Is the AV & FW built into W10 no use ?
Windows Defender is fairly good in W10. Picked up a few nasties our inhouse AV solution didn't discover. Doesn't make up for the rest of Win 10 though.
 
SCO sold their Unix business to Caldera, who were an early but unprofitable Linux distributor (I think I've still got one of their CDs somewhere). The original SCO then ended up getting bought by Sun, who I believe wanted their remaining application software, and the original SCO no longer had any relevance in this.

Caldera then renamed themselves SCO. The original SCO had a partnership with IBM to come out with a new version of Unix, but there was a clause in it which said that IBM could terminate the agreement if SCO changed hands. IBM saw the writing on the wall with respect to proprietary unix (Linux was going to take over the market), and took the opportunity to bail out of the agreement.

SCO's (the new version, which I'll just refer to as SCO from this point on) sales plan was to use their newly aquired sales channels to push Caldera Linux to the SCO unix (Openserver) customer base. That customer base included a lot of small companies in things like car dealerships, restaurants, hotels, and the like, who used it to run vertical business applications (basically, software that runs a specific business niche).

That was a great plan, but it had a flaw. Caldera/SCO's own Linux was crap, and their customer service was very poor. Red Hat on the other hand was very good and gave good customer service, and a lot of the SCO local distributors and software vendors (IT consultants who got paid to set up and maintain systems for local customers) were already selling Red Hat. These third parties dropped SCO's product line, and the company found its newly acquired customer base rapidly melting away.

SCO then got a new CEO, who hit on the brilliant plan of going full on "American" - that is suing everyone in sight - over bullshit claims in hopes of getting paid off to go away. Their main target was IBM, over the termination of their partnership. They slung all sorts of mud at IBM, but none if it stuck. As part of this SCO made various bogus copyright claims about Linux, all of which were proven to be false. SCO told IBM that for a mere half a billion though, all of this could be made to go away. IBM told SCO to ram it, and kept fighting them in court.

SCO also went on to sue loads of other people in order to make a nuisance of themselves while angling for a payoff from IBM. One typical one was that they had a sideline in doing administration work for Novell, who were the ones who actually owned the original copyrights to Unix, having bought them from AT&T. SCO would collect licensing fees from various customers and forward them to Novell in return for a commission. One of their old customers was Chrysler who had a set of Cray supercomputers running a version of Unix called Unixware. These machines were long gone, but the original contract said that Chrysler had to report the serial numbers of the CPU units running Unixware annually. SCO sent a demand to Chrysler to report the serial numbers as per contract. Chrysler returned a statement saying "none". SCO then sued Chrysler on the grounds that "none" was not a serial number. The judge handed SCO their arse, but SCO released a press statement declaring themselves vindicated.

Novell was not amused at all this and issued a cease and desist to SCO with regards to launching lawsuits on Novell's behalf. SCO responded by suing Novell. This did not go well for SCO. Meanwhile SCO's lawsuits against IBM were similarly unsuccessful.

This sort of thing went on until SCO ran out of money. Certain executives at the company still managed to walk away with millions of dollars of the shareholders' money while their shareholders, suppliers, and long suffering business partners got nothing but unpaid bills.

While all this was going on much of the IT press was going "WTF?", if they were paying attention at all. There was however always a cheerleading section who were saying how SCO was right, how they were going to take IBM to the cleaners, and how Linux was going to be killed off. After SCO declared bankruptcy their accounts were made public so that creditors could claim against the assets, and it turned out that SCO was paying off certain people in the IT press (and still owed them money!).

Lawyers on this scale were expensive and SCO needed money to continue. Microsoft funnelled somewhere between 50 and 100 million to them via various backdoor channels just to keep the lawsuits going as they still had dreams of killing off Linux. All of this came out however when they stiffed the guy who was laundering the money for them on his commission, and he leaked the emails outlining the plan. The whole suicidal lawsuit scheme would not have been possible without under the table financing from Microsoft .

Microsoft were always doing various shady crap like this while the company was run by Bill Gates and later, Steve Balmer. This is a major part of why the company was so roundly despised by much of the rest of the IT industry and by professionals working in the field (aside from their crappy products). That has started to slowly change as the company has come under new management, but memories are long and the reputation still lingers.
I give you the famous Groklaw, that thoroughly documented and dissected the entire SCO legal case

 
Last edited:

Verwaltung

Clanker
I've wanted to like Linux but have almost always come up against some annoying incompatibility, a device driver unavailable, or some other machine specific problem that's prevented me from using it despite much command line fiddling. It's a pity as most of the software I use has a Linux / open source pedigree: GIMP, Blender, Libre Office, VLC etc.
 

Latest Threads

Top