Linux, eh? what you on about

Back in those days Microsoft had their own flavour of Unix, remember Xenix?
I thought Xenix was SCO.

Back in the early nineties Unix was hailed as the great white hope of interoperability between machines.

I worked for an American software company at the time. We supported HPUX, DEC Ultrix, IBM AIX, SCO Xenix plus a few others. All different.

Interoperability my arrse.
 
I have tried to escape from Microsoft a few times, tried Redhat Linux, bought the discs and a BFO book of how to do Redhat. Fought with it for a while but got nowhere fast so gave up and went back to XP. Then in the move from XP to win7, I tried again with Ubuntu and Mint. Same again, much fighting with things which should have been simple, like installing programs. I can't remember exactly what the trouble was except that it involved arcane command line stuff, sudo grub rings a bell? Anyway, Win7 setup to look like the older versions of Win, works perfectly at the moment and is effortless to use. I would like to use Linux, but it's too time consuming to learn a new OS these days.... If Win7 becomes unworkable, then I'll try Linux again, anything to avoid the pish that is Win10.....
I was with you up to the last sentence!
 

Scunner

Old-Salt
I was with you up to the last sentence!
You like Win10 ?? Both the kids have Win10 laptops and I find them incomprehensable to operate. All the computers at work run win10 and I watch the guys as they endlessly wait for updates to install, constant crashes and slooooooow ain't the word for them. Meanwhile my steam powered Win7 work machine is up and running in moments, reliable too.
 
If you can't install Ubuntu and then install programmes without using the command line you are, quite frankly, beyond help and Windows is definitely the place for you :)
 
Windows 10 has been done to death elsewhere on ARRSE so I won’t labour the point in this Linux thread.

Got four W10 machines and never had any problems with any of them. Updates run at night. No crashes. Performance is pretty good, even on an old laptop. It’s best on a newish one I wiped for a clean W8 install (with a kosher disk) and then immediately upgraded to W10.
 
Worth mentioning that Linux updates seamlessly in the background while you're working and doesn't kill the machine linke Windows.

Win10 updates work a lot faster if you have an SSD but can be painfully slow on HDD systems due to the disk load.
 
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Worth mentioning that Linux updates seamlessly in the background while your working and doesn't kill the machine linke Windows.

Win10 updates work a lot faster if you have an SSD but can be painfully slow on HDD systems due to the disk load.
I actually had to reboot my machine last month for a security update!
 

endure

GCM
Wasn't it SCO Caldera who bought rights to bits of Unix or a single flavour or something, then ruled that they owned all of it and tried to demand licence fees from, well just about everybody? We at IBM had an SCO Caldera watch on the news as they threatened multi-billion lawsuits against all and sundry. IBM just sat back and said, "Go on then."

I couldn't remember the name until you mentioned SCO.

SCO Caldera seemed to spend most of their time in courtrooms. They even sued Novell.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
You like Win10 ?? Both the kids have Win10 laptops and I find them incomprehensable to operate. All the computers at work run win10 and I watch the guys as they endlessly wait for updates to install, constant crashes and slooooooow ain't the word for them. Meanwhile my steam powered Win7 work machine is up and running in moments, reliable too.
It probably depends how you got to Win 10.

There used to be two code streams, for Intel and RISC (NT) processors.

I think 2000 was the first to run on both chipsets. But they were developed separately and released alternately. You couldn't easily jump from an odd to an even release number or vice versa.

At 10, they merged the code streams, went agile and forced everyone to go to 10. But 10 was based on 7 (there was no 9). 8 and Vista didn't upgrade well to 10, whereas 7 did. I upgraded from 7 to 10 with no effort whatsoever.

That said, last year my machine died. Only option was a factory reset to five years previously the night before I went on holiday.

Reset machine to 2014, then spent three days installing all the service in between. Mercifully, all my data were either on the cloud or the separate HDD. I lost nothing at all of import except time.
 
I don't have a problem with Win10 in everyday use.

It's settled down into a reasonable operating system after only 3 years development post-release, and once you've:

Gotten rid of the bloatware
Removed the crapware (Xbox One, crappy games etc)
Turned off the 20-odd spyware settings
Put a bit of black nasty over the laptop camera
Turned Cortana off (as far as possible)
Re-loaded the old versions of media player, paint and photo viewer
Run CCleaner a couple of times
Set up a decent firewall and anti-virus

It's just so bl**dy slow. I find it horribly slow with anything less than a Core i5 with 8GB and an SSD, and on my old work machine (a Celeron Nettop which was perfectly adequate with Win7 - 32 bit) updates can take over an hour to install and big updates over 3 hours.

BTW, I was forced to go Win10 on this machine due to needing to be Cyber Essentials Certified.
 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Is the AV & FW built into W10 no use ?
If, like most people, you're sat behind a router (as I recall), Network Address Translation (NAT) acts as a de facto hardware firewall preventing access to machines. The only danger is that a virus could zombify your machine and stuff can get out.

The firewall companies all protect against this on their free product, but of course they want you to buy stuff you don't need. More important is therefore the AV software.

Horses for courses. I used to recommend Norton until I realised they only gave me 11 months cover on a 12 month licence. And the software created terrible lag. IBM dropped them as preferred supplier, and so did I. AVG annoyed the sh¡t out of me, continually forcing my browser to use Yahoo. Ditched them too. I can't remember what AV I have on the PC. (the firewall is ZoneAlarm, as used by IBM. Maybe the AV is too. It never disturbs me. It just runs.) I know plenty of people with enough sense are quite happy with what Windows provides.
 
The vast majoity of hackers get access via idiots clicking on malicious email links.

Hence the other thread I started on Strange emails.

Which I immediately marked as junked & deleted.
 
I thought Xenix was SCO.

Back in the early nineties Unix was hailed as the great white hope of interoperability between machines.

I worked for an American software company at the time. We supported HPUX, DEC Ultrix, IBM AIX, SCO Xenix plus a few others. All different.

Interoperability my arrse.
Used all those except AIX, but for my sins have used Solaris a lot
 
You like Win10 ?? Both the kids have Win10 laptops and I find them incomprehensable to operate. All the computers at work run win10 and I watch the guys as they endlessly wait for updates to install, constant crashes and slooooooow ain't the word for them. Meanwhile my steam powered Win7 work machine is up and running in moments, reliable too.
You can schedule updates to take place at whatever time is convenient in Win 10.
 
Used all those except AIX, but for my sins have used Solaris a lot
That was one of the versions I forgot about. Our product worked very well on Sun and I was always very impressed with their kit (insofar as you can be).
 
One of this month's computer magazines has a Mint 19.3 DVD sellotaped to the front. I suggest investing, and seeing for yourself how friendly Linux desktops are these days. You can boot it from the disc* without having to install anything, and if you do like it, creating a dual-boot with Windows is taken care of by the installer.

Even if you're not particularly taken with it, it'll be a life-saver if Windows ever gets so corrupted that it won't start. You'll be able to access and backup your files by booting from the DVD.


* Windows 10 does its best to make this difficult, but it's straightforward to put things right if it's disabled removable boot devices like DVD drives.
 

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