Linux, eh? what you on about

I have a 15 year old Acer F6 (dual core, 2GB of RAM) running both WinXP (the original OS) and Mint. It has two 1TB HDDs installed, Linux on one, XP on the other. I can select which I want to use at boot. The machine is a legacy PC that I keep to run some legacy software. In practice, it's faster using Linux than it is with XP.

Any OS will run slowly if you're running it off a memory stick. I have also run Linux of a USB 3 stick in a USB3 port and it's tolerable if a little slow to load.

If I didn't have customers who were tied to Microsoft then I could quite happily do all my reports and photo editing on a Linux machine.
 
I have a 15 year old Acer F6 (dual core, 2GB of RAM) running both WinXP (the original OS) and Mint. It has two 1TB HDDs installed, Linux on one, XP on the other. I can select which I want to use at boot. The machine is a legacy PC that I keep to run some legacy software. In practice, it's faster using Linux than it is with XP.

Any OS will run slowly if you're running it off a memory stick. I have also run Linux of a USB 3 stick in a USB3 port and it's tolerable if a little slow to load.

If I didn't have customers who were tied to Microsoft then I could quite happily do all my reports and photo editing on a Linux machine.
You should advise your customers to get off XP.
 

endure

GCM
You should advise your customers to get off XP.

The Post Office uses NT4 on its counter machines. It has north of 36,000 of them. Starbucks cash tills throughout the world use NT4.

Sometimes it's easier to say something than to actually do it.
 
The Post Office uses NT4 on its counter machines. It has north of 36,000 of them. Starbucks cash tills throughout the world use NT4.

Sometimes it's easier to say something than to actually do it.
I would in that case make sure that any transactions that I did with either of them were cash-only so that my financial information didn't end up in North Korea or Moldova.
 

endure

GCM
I would in that case make sure that any transactions that I did with either of them were cash-only so that my financial information didn't end up in North Korea or Moldova.
They're both run on massive closed system VPNs.
 
They're both run on massive closed system VPNs.
That may be, but POS (Point of Sale) systems get hacked regularly, as they are a major target. It only takes one chink in the armour for a hacker to get in at some point, and after that he has access to the entire network and a long list of historic and never patched vulnerabilities to choose from. It's what has often been described as a hard outer shell with a soft centre.

The reason that so many POS systems are so outdated is largely due to that their POS IT has been outsourced to companies who have no real incentive to do anything proactive about security or planning for the future. They meet their contract terms and then that's it.
 

endure

GCM

endure

GCM
That may be, but POS (Point of Sale) systems get hacked regularly, as they are a major target. It only takes one chink in the armour for a hacker to get in at some point, and after that he has access to the entire network and a long list of historic and never patched vulnerabilities to choose from. It's what has often been described as a hard outer shell with a soft centre.

The reason that so many POS systems are so outdated is largely due to that their POS IT has been outsourced to companies who have no real incentive to do anything proactive about security or planning for the future. They meet their contract terms and then that's it.

The Post Office system is a closed system run entirely by Post Office staff. Support for field engineers is provided by PO staff.

The Starbucks system is also a closed system. If you're onsite anywhere in the world and have a problem you speak directly to Starbucks support staff in Seattle.
 
I had forgotten just how crap that thing was. 1.6 GHz Atom, 1 GB of RAM, 160 GB hard drive. A tiny screen.
Sounds like my Samsung NC10 netbook (Retd). Want another?

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It has now been rendered gerfükken by virtue of having no installed installed memory. It had a 2Gb memory stick in it (the maximum possible for this speedy little beast) but I have just hooked that into an HP6730b to make that a 4GB monster (max 8Gb) for a bit of self torture of the linux kind... linux is pants you know.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
You should advise your customers to get off XP.
All very well, but customers are reluctant to change. Done badly, it's sh!t. Done well, it's time consuming and very expensive.

IBM run all sorts of legacy software (and hardware - both behind firewalls) to support particularly Japanese companies that are prepared to pay an arm and a leg to keep that 20-year-old IBM mainframe running back levels of IBM software.

Once it was decided I was retiring, I was moved to a role that involved keeping all the Hursley IT software up to date. Literally hundreds of ancient devices paid for by clients to enable testing of their back-level software on IBM's back-level hardware. Loadsa money.
 
You should advise your customers to get off XP.
It's my machine and it has some irreplaceable legacy software on it.
It's rarely connected to the internet and then via our work network connection which is also firewalled.
Mostly, it's air gapped from the internet as the legacy software doesn't require an internet connection

AFAIK none of my customers is using XP
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Technically Linux already runs under Windows, see Linux subsystem for Windows

With an explanation of it here
And, in my Linux days, I ran Windows in a VM. Which isn't the same as VM, a precursor to MVS and z/OS that allowed testing of MVS without bringing the mainframe down if MVS crashed. SPA (the IBM Service Process Architecture) ran on VM. When I attended a friend's retirement recently SPA was recently or imminently being sunset. Users without MVS / z/OS skills now tend to use zLinux (Linux for z Series architecture), probably, as noted earlier, based on Red Hat.
 
And, in my Linux days, I ran Windows in a VM. Which isn't the same as VM, a precursor to MVS and z/OS that allowed testing of MVS without bringing the mainframe down if MVS crashed. SPA (the IBM Service Process Architecture) ran on VM. When I attended a friend's retirement recently SPA was recently or imminently being sunset. Users without MVS / z/OS skills now tend to use zLinux (Linux for z Series architecture), probably, as noted earlier, based on Red Hat.
Back in those days Microsoft had their own flavour of Unix, remember Xenix?
 

hotel_california

LE
Book Reviewer
Users of free operating systems that require rock solid performance and bomb proof security use FreeBSD. Check it out.
 

Azul_R

Clanker
Back in those days Microsoft had their own flavour of Unix, remember Xenix?
Yes, but it was effectively inherited by SCO after not many years.

I once had some dealings with SCO as a result of which I got to attend their big annual event in Santa Cruz, remembered for the incongruity of hearing Grace Slick belting out "White Rabbit" for the corporate sponsors.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Yes, but it was effectively inherited by SCO after not many years.

I once had some dealings with SCO as a result of which I got to attend their big annual event in Santa Cruz, remembered for the incongruity of hearing Grace Slick belting out "White Rabbit" for the corporate sponsors.
Wasn't it SCO Caldera who bought rights to bits of Unix or a single flavour or something, then ruled that they owned all of it and tried to demand licence fees from, well just about everybody? We at IBM had an SCO Caldera watch on the news as they threatened multi-billion lawsuits against all and sundry. IBM just sat back and said, "Go on then."

I couldn't remember the name until you mentioned SCO.
 

Scunner

Old-Salt
I have tried to escape from Microsoft a few times, tried Redhat Linux, bought the discs and a BFO book of how to do Redhat. Fought with it for a while but got nowhere fast so gave up and went back to XP. Then in the move from XP to win7, I tried again with Ubuntu and Mint. Same again, much fighting with things which should have been simple, like installing programs. I can't remember exactly what the trouble was except that it involved arcane command line stuff, sudo grub rings a bell? Anyway, Win7 setup to look like the older versions of Win, works perfectly at the moment and is effortless to use. I would like to use Linux, but it's too time consuming to learn a new OS these days.... If Win7 becomes unworkable, then I'll try Linux again, anything to avoid the pish that is Win10.....
 
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