Linux, eh? what you on about

Basically this lot are flogging a Linux USB with some other bits and pieces of freeware onboard so that techno-mongs have an easy time of it.

 
I've been running an Acer aspire, with an extremely small HD for the last 14 yrs. I've upgraded the RAM, OS and video card and it's been absolutely brilliant for what I want. Have stripped out all the additional junk software, and installed a local NAS. All my DVDs, pictures, films, documents are on the NAS, which is backed up to a 4TB external drive.

Sadly, it's currently running Windows 7, so I will need to upgrade. Gave Linux some consideration but will go with a new Windows 10 PC.

Love Windows and MS products, hate anything Apple related, and my NAS currently has over 2000 films on it, and is linked to my Samsung Smart TVs, so win win.
Linux is perfect for setting up a NAS drive. I've got a server running at home running Debian (HP Microserver, 4x 2TB HDD's in a 6TB array). It runs my local storage server as well as my local Minecraft server

Look at Openmediavault for a Linux distro designed for building NAS systems


I've got an Acer Aspire One at work that I also run command line Debian on as a network testing device.
 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
People who didn't run IBM mainframes, Windows PCs or Apple used Unix. Unix is a far more powerful operating system than Windows and was popular in universities, etc. Over time, Unix got over more bloated, slower and more expensivd.

A guy (Linus Thorsveld or something) reverse engineered Unix and wrote Linux (being careful not to infringe Unix copyright). Linux Is Not UniX. But it's community run and free.

Various different communities have created different flavours of Linux for different purposes and with different target users.

I could have just posted a link. It would probably have been easier and more accurate than typing this.

A few years before I left IBM, there was mayhem when somebody (rumoured to be a North Korean) put a keylogger onto a South Korean banker's Windows PC and for the only time ever an IBM mainframe was hacked. Around the world, virtually every bank uses IBM mainframes (though I seem to recall that South Korea have changed that. At Barclays, a very senior friend told me shortly before I retired that 100% of mission critical code runs on IBM mainframes. Anything not on IBM mainframe is not mission critical).

Any IBMer who had a critical role (I built the WebSphere MQ for z/OS deliverable. Whenever any processor contacts an IBM mainframe, it enters via the MQ message queuing system. I had a critical role) was obliged in a matter of months to adopt Linux. Yet Software Development and Fulfilment at Poughkeepsie, NY used a Windows package to test and verify the package, and this was so old, there was nobody with the skill to reengineer it to run on Linux. So we still needed Windows.

I'm sure 5-10 years on, the dark web are working on hacking Linux, so that was a great experience for me, thank you very much. Glad I'm out, considering how often banking systems now go down at the weekend (which is when they apply maintenance).

Not on my shift, guv.
 
Buy a Chromebook from Currys.

Save yourself some grief.
Excellent idea. Chrome being a derivative of Linux, but without the hassle of installation and having the backing of a webscale company. I believe it can run Linux app as a well as Chrome ones.

Must try it myself!
 
People who didn't run IBM mainframes, Windows PCs or Apple used Unix. Unix is a far more powerful operating system than Windows and was popular in universities, etc. Over time, Unix got over more bloated, slower and more expensivd.

A guy (Linus Thorsveld or something) reverse engineered Unix and wrote Linux (being careful not to infringe Unix copyright). Linux Is Not UniX. But it's community run and free.

Various different communities have created different flavours of Linux for different purposes and with different target users.

I could have just posted a link. It would probably have been easier and more accurate than typing this.

A few years before I left IBM, there was mayhem when somebody (rumoured to be a North Korean) put a keylogger onto a South Korean banker's Windows PC and for the only time ever an IBM mainframe was hacked. Around the world, virtually every bank uses IBM mainframes (though I seem to recall that South Korea have changed that. At Barclays, a very senior friend told me shortly before I retired that 100% of mission critical code runs on IBM mainframes. Anything not on IBM mainframe is not mission critical).

Any IBMer who had a critical role (I built the WebSphere MQ for z/OS deliverable. Whenever any processor contacts an IBM mainframe, it enters via the MQ message queuing system. I had a critical role) was obliged in a matter of months to adopt Linux. Yet Software Development and Fulfilment at Poughkeepsie, NY used a Windows package to test and verify the package, and this was so old, there was nobody with the skill to reengineer it to run on Linux. So we still needed Windows.

I'm sure 5-10 years on, the dark web are working on hacking Linux, so that was a great experience for me, thank you very much. Glad I'm out, considering how often banking systems now go down at the weekend (which is when they apply maintenance).

Not on my shift, guv.
Hence why I prefer Apple gear. It’s genuine Unix underneath.
 
Basically this lot are flogging a Linux USB with some other bits and pieces of freeware onboard so that techno-mongs have an easy time of it.

I saw this a while back and went searching for reviews on it, hardly a good thing was said about it. Some reviews links below.


 
Having recently deployed an under £5 RPi zero with Pi-hole I decided to repurpose an older HP laptop as a Linux machine. It is now dual boot with Raspian Buster and full fat Mint.

I flocking well hate them with an almost religious fervour. Having been a Dos to Windows 3 and every version since plus iOS for many years I fear Linux is actually the malicious the work of the very devil himself.

Command Line Linux is manageable and indeed preferable for little projects but the desktops are deplorable.
 
Is the PC running SATA hard-disks or IDE? How much memory is there? What is the processor? What version of USB does the machine have?

Making assumptions based on what was mentioned earlier, you are likely to have SATA drives (ie. modern-ish), 2GB or more of memory, USB-2 and a reasonable Celeron or Core processor. Get someone to put Ubuntu or Xubuntu (a slightly lighter version of Ubuntu) on to a USB stick, configure the BIOS to boot from it, and try out Linux without needing to change the existing hard-disks.

If you decide that you like Linux, get yourself a small SSD (120GB, under thirty quid) and put it on there. That will mean you have a much more speedy system for a minimal outlay. Whether you keep Windows or not is up to you, though you can boot into either operating system with a dual-boot setup if you want to.

If you decide that you prefer Windows, you can copy that Windows installation to an SSD and still get a noticeable performance gain especially when booting or opening a 'heavy' program. Good luck.
 
I saw this a while back and went searching for reviews on it, hardly a good thing was said about it. Some reviews links below.


Interesting, I would not buy it personally as I have a teenager in the house and we all know that teenagers can program anyhting.

I saw this thing advertised and had my lad plonk Ubuntu on a USB, it does not really make the old laptop faster as speed is as much a function of the processor as the operating system.
 
Interesting, I would not buy it personally as I have a teenager in the house and we all know that teenagers can program anyhting.

I saw this thing advertised and had my lad plonk Ubuntu on a USB, it does not really make the old laptop faster as speed is as much a function of the processor as the operating system.
That and the speed of any OS run from an external drive will depend on the transfer rate of that drive (badly worded I know).

Trying to run the simplest lightweight OS across a USB 1.0 connection is never going to go well compared to a local installation on a hard drive. Certainly my Windows 7 on an SSD is significantly faster than Ubuntu was on a laptop's HDD.
 
Linux is good to play with. I have it as a dual boot option. It is not ready, imho, as a stand alone consumer o/s.
I don't know if it ever will be as long as there are geeks who, underneath everything, are still wedded to a command line interface. I believe that they actually prefer that it should stay exclusive and geeky for its own sake. That's how they like it.

There are also some areas where it really does not cut the mustard and follows rather than leads, or else is too complicated to be worthwhile. Music and media production, for example.

I think there is still a place for it. If only to keep Windows feet to the fire.
 
Interesting, I would not buy it personally as I have a teenager in the house and we all know that teenagers can program anyhting.

I saw this thing advertised and had my lad plonk Ubuntu on a USB, it does not really make the old laptop faster as speed is as much a function of the processor as the operating system.
I believe you, for computer problems I have offspring, their offspring and neighbour kid. First two costs me nothing and the neighbour kid gets to hunt coyotes on my property in return.
 
Linux is good to play with. I have it as a dual boot option. It is not ready, imho, as a stand alone consumer o/s.
I don't know if it ever will be as long as there are geeks who, underneath everything, are still wedded to a command line interface. I believe that they actually prefer that it should stay exclusive and geeky for its own sake. That's how they like it.

There are also some areas where it really does not cut the mustard and follows rather than leads, or else is too complicated to be worthwhile. Music and media production, for example.

I think there is still a place for it. If only to keep Windows feet to the fire.
My resident hacker uses it when he is looking at stuff he should not be (dark web) along with a couple of other widgets to guarantee his anonymity............he has been warned, if the Feds come knocking it better be to offer him a job, or he is on his own.
 
My resident hacker uses it when he is looking at stuff he should not be (dark web) along with a couple of other widgets to guarantee his anonymity............he has been warned, if the Feds come knocking it better be to offer him a job, or he is on his own.
I'm not actually very sure why a specific choice of o/s would assist anyone wishing to access restricted areas or to cover their tracks. The web portals are the same.
 

endure

GCM
Excellent idea. Chrome being a derivative of Linux, but without the hassle of installation and having the backing of a webscale company. I believe it can run Linux app as a well as Chrome ones.

Must try it myself!
It can run Linux but it's a bit of a fiddle. The latest version of Chromebook has access to the Android Playstore so has access to all the Android apps in there.
 
I saw this a while back and went searching for reviews on it, hardly a good thing was said about it. Some reviews links below.


Xtra-PC doesn't do anything for you that you can't get for free by downloading a Linux distro and installing it on a USB flash drive. It will also suffer from the speed limits of USB in terms of reading or writing storage, such as when booting.

Installing on a USB flash drive can be a good way to try out a Linux distro, but if you decide that you like it well enough to be using it full time, then installing it on your hard drive would be to go. Ubuntu has a live mode which lets you do try it out, and if you like it to then do an install on your hard drive.
 
Excellent idea. Chrome being a derivative of Linux, but without the hassle of installation and having the backing of a webscale company. I believe it can run Linux app as a well as Chrome ones.

Must try it myself!
Yeah, its just that any data you load on it suddenly belongs to Google
 
Xtra-PC doesn't do anything for you that you can't get for free by downloading a Linux distro and installing it on a USB flash drive. It will also suffer from the speed limits of USB in terms of reading or writing storage, such as when booting.

Installing on a USB flash drive can be a good way to try out a Linux distro, but if you decide that you like it well enough to be using it full time, then installing it on your hard drive would be to go. Ubuntu has a live mode which lets you do try it out, and if you like it to then do an install on your hard drive.
I believe you, see my post #32. What I know about computers wouldn't cover the back of a postage stamp.
 
OK, another serious question. My dad gave me his very old laptop a year or two back. 1Gb of memory, not sure on the hard disk size (30-40Gb??) and it's possibly Windows XP, not sure haven't turned it on since he gave it to me. I recall taking off all the software that was on it apart from Windows.

Now there's a laptop repair place I've used in the past a couple of miles from home. Assuming they would be up for it, is it worth asking them to "de-Windows" it and put some version of Linux on it for me to try out the OS? I think Linux comes with a suite of programmes as standard - is that right?

If it is worth a try, which version would you suggest, perhaps other than, "Whatever the repair place has available or is prepared to install" of course.

Thanks in anticipation.

Edit: I'm happy if the laptop ends up as a total Linux machine, I only want to try it out and if everything goes tits up, the things going in the bin, it's not really worth more than a few quid at best.
If you want to keep using it, consider Lubuntu, it's made for exactly this situation.

You will want to know what CPU you have, whether it's 32 or 64 bit. The specs on your laptop sound like it may be a 32 bit CPU, but you will need to check. Someone else may be able to give a suggestion on how to find that out using Windows.

Many mainstream Linux desktop distros only have 64 bit versions, as there isn't a lot of 32 bit desktop/laptop hardware still surviving. 32 bit versions are often referred to as "x-86" and 64 bit as "AMD-64". Despite the name, both are compatible with Intel or AMD CPUs. The "AMD-64" name comes from AMD being the ones who invented the 64 bit version while Intel dug their heels in and resisted coming out with a 64 bit version for years due to a failed marketing strategy. Ultimately Intel had to copy AMD's 64 bit chip.

Long story short, look to see if you have a 32 bit or 64 bit CPU, with the former sometimes being called "x-86" and the latter "AMD-64". If you have a 64 bit CPU, then you could use either version, but a 64 bit OS will run faster. If you have a 32 bit CPU, then you need the 32 bit OS.

I have an old laptop with specs similar to yours and I tried out 32 bit Lubuntu on it a couple of years ago. It worked fine, but I never ended up using it much as the battery was pretty much dead anyway and wasn't practical to replace.

I would recommend Ubuntu, as it has a very simple install procedure. If you feel like trying it yourself, then you can find installation instructions on line. It's not really much more difficult than downloading the software and burning it to a DVD (if your laptop has a DVD drive) or otherwise to a USB flash drive. You will need burning software for this.

The actual installation of Ubuntu is easy, being much, much simpler and more polished than Windows. You boot from the DVD (or USB flash drive), select install, and then answer a series of questions about things like user name, password, time zone, keyboard type, etc. There are web sites which go through the process step by step.

If you don't feel comfortable trying this out yourself, then I'm not sure it's really worth paying someone to do it when you have an old lap top in unknown condition, and whose battery may be on its last legs. Find someone who will do it for free, or seriously think about whether it's worth the potential headaches with old hardware with a possibly dodgy battery.
 
I’ve got a 10 year old Macbook that’s on its last legs. It’s got 2GB RAM and a dual core 64-bit processor though, so it’s not all bad. The lad’s had it, beaten he shit out of the keyboard and it has several dents in it. But an eBay $30 SSD and reformat and I can use it for a server. If MacOS is still slow on it, I’ll put Linux on it and use it headless as a proper server.

Though this doesn’t help the OP. Try a Live version.
 

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