Likely new Israeli PM Naftali Bennett

Jacl

Old-Salt
Another curios - back when he had just founded his party, he turned up at a demo to legalize cannabis.
I think he has quite a broad perspective on life and could bring a breath of fresh air.
Interesting!
Or is it just groan worthy?
Thanks for the post anyway. The news did not have much to say about Bennett, so a comment from Israel is welcome
 
Interesting!
Or is it just groan worthy?
Thanks for the post anyway. The news did not have much to say about Bennett, so a comment from Israel is welcome

Just out of (military) interest, this is the new Minister for Religious Affairs, former F-16 pilot and commander of two squadrons Matan Kahana.
The IAF wanted him for his compulsory military service but he signed a waiver in order to serve with the IDF's THEM for 3.5 years first.

1623836382237.png
 
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The first thing Arrsers need to know is he started his military service as a member of THEM (Sayaret Matkal) and after becoming an officer, went on to another SF unit (Maglan). His former CO has been interviewed a lot recently and can't speak too highly of him.
Seeing as Benjamin Netanyahu also served in THEM (as did Ehud Barak), it does seem to be a boost for a political career... For those unaware, the only Israeli military casualty in the raid on Entebbe was his older brother Yonatan Netanyahu.

ISTR a claim that because of the time pressures involved in SF selection within a conscripted military, "who you know" gave you a distinct advantage in Israeli SF recruitment, with less effort put into long-drawn-out selection courses; was that true? (I presume it's changed since)
 
Seeing as Benjamin Netanyahu also served in THEM (as did Ehud Barak), it does seem to be a boost for a political career... For those unaware, the only Israeli military casualty in the raid on Entebbe was his older brother Yonatan Netanyahu.

ISTR a claim that because of the time pressures involved in SF selection within a conscripted military, "who you know" gave you a distinct advantage in Israeli SF recruitment, with less effort put into long-drawn-out selection courses; was that true? (I presume it's changed since)

I work with a guy who passed selection but was passed over in favour of another kid whose father was a high-up, so it can happen sometimes.
 
Just out of (military) interest, this is the new Minister for Religious Affairs, former F-16 pilot and commander of two squadrons Matan Kahana.
The IAF wanted him for his compulsory military service but he signed a waiver in order to serve with the IDF's THEM for 3.5 years first.

View attachment 581887
Minister for Religious Affairs, why a former military bloke* and not a Rabbi? At a guess I'd say that Israel must be about the only western democracy that has such a minister. In places like Iran I'd expect such a post.

*Given that just about everyone has served even if only national service, then non-servers must be rare.
 
Minister for Religious Affairs, why a former military bloke* and not a Rabbi? At a guess I'd say that Israel must be about the only western democracy that has such a minister. In places like Iran I'd expect such a post.

*Given that just about everyone has served even if only national service, then non-servers must be rare.

There is freedom of religion and large numbers of Muslims, as well as Christians.
Religion is not fully separate from state - there is no civil marriage and no civil burial.
I am not sure of the current statistics but it is not correct thet "just about everyone" has served.
 
There is freedom of religion and large numbers of Muslims, as well as Christians.
Religion is not fully separate from state - there is no civil marriage and no civil burial.
I am not sure of the current statistics but it is not correct thet "just about everyone" has served.
תודה
 
There is freedom of religion and large numbers of Muslims, as well as Christians.
Religion is not fully separate from state - there is no civil marriage and no civil burial.
I am not sure of the current statistics but it is not correct thet "just about everyone" has served.
I think that in most european states religion and state are separated, that as a result of centuries of negative experience with the Church sticking its nose in everywhere. I think that that was covered in the God botherers thread.
As for everyone serving I must have heard that in some report or documentary, probably by a journo who can spell Izrael Israil, Israel. It wasn't Wiki, a quick glance there was quite revealing, for the benefit of other Arrsers it even explained what loof is, a sort of kosher Spam, which was withdrawn from service in 2008. I wonder if loof was missed by generations of Israeli soldiers or did it die quietly? The other rations sounded interesting, eg stuffed vine leaves and halva. I think that I've tried halva many years ago when a SOAF soldier offered me something, which more less fits in with the Wiki description, was rather nice, tasted of more.
 
I think that in most european states religion and state are separated, that as a result of centuries of negative experience with the Church sticking its nose in everywhere. I think that that was covered in the God botherers thread.
As for everyone serving I must have heard that in some report or documentary, probably by a journo who can spell Izrael Israil, Israel. It wasn't Wiki, a quick glance there was quite revealing, for the benefit of other Arrsers it even explained what loof is, a sort of kosher Spam, which was withdrawn from service in 2008. I wonder if loof was missed by generations of Israeli soldiers or did it die quietly? The other rations sounded interesting, eg stuffed vine leaves and halva. I think that I've tried halva many years ago when a SOAF soldier offered me something, which more less fits in with the Wiki description, was rather nice, tasted of more.

Loof, from whence I chose my Arrse-name (and "kar" means cold) was not particularly appetizing on its own but was handy for slicing and frying, or grilling over the fire. At one point in my service I was with 3 other squaddies guarding a rather isolated place in the field. The loof, tins of which we had in plenty, was handy for feeding a very friendly dog that adopted us. Not only would she keep one's legs warm during guard shifts on the winter nights but she would go ape sh*t the moment anything moved within 200 meters of us - the perfect companion for guarding.
I think there is nostalgia for it among squaddies of my age - on a Lebanon vets forum someone recently posted a pic of a tin.
1623924400071.png


Halva was ubiquitous in the IDF, in packets and in small tins in the field rations.
The tins of stuffed vine leaves came 20 years later, when they became available cheaply from Turkey.
 
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Loof, from whence I chose my Arrse-name (and "kar" means cold) was not particularly appetizing on its own but was handy for slicing and frying, or grilling over the fire. At one point in my service I was with 3 other squaddies guarding a rather isolated place in the field, the loof, tins of which we had in plenty, was handy for feeding a very friendly dog that adopted us. Not only would she keep one's legs warm during guard shifts on the winter nights but she would go ape sh*t the moment anything moved within 200 meters of us - the perfect companion for guarding.
I think there is nostalgia for it among squaddies of my age - on a Lebanon vets forum someone recently posted a pic of a tin.

Halva was ubiquitous in the IDF, in packets and in small tins in the field rations.
The tins of stuffed vine leaves came 20 years later, when they became available cheaply from Turkey.
Memory jog:- Back in the stone age, 1972, while in training at 11 sigs catterick, my old mum sent me an old biscuit tin stuffed with Halva, i was called down to the troop office, and had to explain to the DS sergeant what was in the tin, as he haven't seen or heard of it before. Back in our 8 man room, the lads all tried some, some hatred it" It tastes like sweet sawdust" said one, others said it was ok, i had about a quarter of the tin to myself. When i visit mum in north london, i always get a large block to bring back up north. :p
 
Memory jog:- Back in the stone age, 1972, while in training at 11 sigs catterick, my old mum sent me an old biscuit tin stuffed with Halva, i was called down to the troop office, and had to explain to the DS sergeant what was in the tin, as he haven't seen or heard of it before. Back in our 8 man room, the lads all tried some, some hatred it" It tastes like sweet sawdust" said one, others said it was ok, i had about a quarter of the tin to myself. When i visit mum in north london, i always get a large block to bring back up north. :p


North London - available in Greek, Turkish, Iranian, Halal and Kosher food shops....
It's not bad and a huge energy source.

One pitch-dark night I was stagging away at a little outpost on a hilltop overlooking the border fence with Lebanon, when I heard the unmistakable grating of metal on metal, very close in front of me. It sounded as if someone was very gingerly trying to get through the concertina wire. I froze. It sounded so close I didn't even dare rack my weapon for the risk of being heard.
Adrenaline pumping, I intensely scanned the concertina with the NVG. Strangely though, I couldn't see anything suspicious at all, even though the noise continued from close af.
Having satisfied myself that it wasn't someone trying to infiltrate our defenses I climbed out of the trench and approached the source of the noise.
There I found a hedgehog with its head stuck in an empty IDF halva tin (between the tin and the half open lid) that some thoughtless squaddie on stag must have chucked out of the OP.
 
Loof, from whence I chose my Arrse-name (and "kar" means cold) was not particularly appetizing on its own but was handy for slicing and frying, or grilling over the fire. At one point in my service I was with 3 other squaddies guarding a rather isolated place in the field. The loof, tins of which we had in plenty, was handy for feeding a very friendly dog that adopted us. Not only would she keep one's legs warm during guard shifts on the winter nights but she would go ape sh*t the moment anything moved within 200 meters of us - the perfect companion for guarding.
I think there is nostalgia for it among squaddies of my age - on a Lebanon vets forum someone recently posted a pic of a tin.
View attachment 582184

Halva was ubiquitous in the IDF, in packets and in small tins in the field rations.
The tins of stuffed vine leaves came 20 years later, when they became available cheaply from Turkey.
Spam was also pretty gruesome unless fried in batter, spam fritters. Failing that drowned in ketchup or mustard it was edible.
Guard dogs, ancient lo-tech that still works well.
I'm a bit puzzled, why is that soldier pointing up at the letter tsadie?
I assume that to open it you had something like this:

image-130.jpeg



Or for problem tins:





300px-M72A2_LAW.png
 
Best can openers ever, I still have a stash of them.
No idea why the label graphics were like that. Always kinda liked 'em though.
 
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