Light Cav vs Armoured Cav

Having read a couple of similar threads on the topic I was wondering if anyone in the know wrt current doctrine could clear up some questions.

1) Apart from the vehicles used, what are the differences in operational capability and specialism between light cavalry and armoured cavalry (range ahead of friendly forces / use of force / method of recce)

2) Are there any major organisational differences between the two types of unit? (attached assets / formation size)

Thanks in advance
 
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None of them are RTR. Ergo they are lesser beings.

Up your game ;)
 

MrBane

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Having read a couple of similar threads on the topic I was wondering if anyone in the know wrt current doctrine could clear up some questions.

1) Apart from the vehicles used, what are the differences in operational capability and specialism between light cavalry and armoured cavalry (range ahead of friendly forces / use of force / method of recce)

2) Are there any major organisational differences between the two types of unit? (attached assets / formation size)

Thanks in advance

Essentially, the biggest difference between Armoured Cavalry and Light Cavalry is that the Light Cavalry, with their Jackals, will spend a far greater portion of their time cold, wet and miserable on UK based training, whilst those fine chaps in, for example, the HCR, will still have the opportunity to go hatch down, get a brew on in warmth and relative comfort, and spaff off to whatever porn they've stashed on their tablet.

I'm too far out now (2012) to be able to comment on formations sizes, etc, but for comparison, on Herrick 11 we deployed with Jackals in the BRF role, and per troop we had about the same number of vehicles as if it had been CVR(T).

I'd imagine attached units / arms, etc won't be much different, albeit there is a slightly lower mechanical support requirement with Jackal than with the ever dying CVR(T), and replen for a Jackal is a hell of a lot easier than replen for, say, Scimitar. (Large capacity fuel tank plus ample carry space for more plus a fuckton of space for extra ammo).
 
Crash Test Dummy is in some ways encapsulating an important point. The real purpose of Light cavalry is to keep cap badges alive in the uncertain hope that one day there will be more real tanks and reconnaissance vehicles in the RAC for these units to operate. You are effectively fulfilling the role of the horsed cavalry in the 1930's except that the next real war is unlikely to last long enough for us to build the necessary new equipment while it is going on for you to re-role in time. You will therefore either be a) a military irrelevance or b) cannon fodder. You may get used for neo-imperial policing in the mean time.
While being in the HCR is not an option I would wish on my worst enemy [other regiments are available], you do need to ask yourself what you want to contribute to the military as well as what you want to get out of it before attempting to select your unit.
 

MrBane

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Crash Test Dummy is in some ways encapsulating an important point. The real purpose of Light cavalry is to keep cap badges alive in the uncertain hope that one day there will be more real tanks and reconnaissance vehicles in the RAC for these units to operate. You are effectively fulfilling the role of the horsed cavalry in the 1930's except that the next real war is unlikely to last long enough for us to build the necessary new equipment while it is going on for you to re-role in time. You will therefore either be a) a military irrelevance or b) cannon fodder. You may get used for neo-imperial policing in the mean time.
While being in the HCR is not an option I would wish on my worst enemy [other regiments are available], you do need to ask yourself what you want to contribute to the military as well as what you want to get out of it before attempting to select your unit.

Which is very true - if all you want to do is take, take, take, then HCR is the way forward. :D

I remember when a few of us from the same Phase 2 at Bovington caught up and were talking about what we'd done. HCR it seemed, had far surpassed the other Regiments in terms of course opportunities, deployments abroad and general travel, as well as from what I could tell, the chances to get on our teams such as the ski and sailing teams.

I admit readily that HCR is a bit of an anomaly and probably shouldn't exist now, but meh, it was a gravy train whilst I was in, and living in Windsor was frankly brilliant!
 
I’m from London and am having troubles on deciding what regiment to go for. I’m set on RAC but cannot decide whether to go for light cavalry maybe Light Dragoon’s, as I like the idea of the both mounted and dismounted role, or to go for Royal Tank Regiment and become a Tankie.

However the one problem is that I don’t think the Light Dragoons recruit from the south. They’re called the cavalry of the North.

I would consider the Scots DG as I have Scottish ties. But the ties are far from close. As I hear it though, there’s very few Scots in the regiment.

I love the idea of Being a challenger 2 crewman, but I want to be deployed on a proper tour, and tanks aren’t used in insurgent conflicts. And let’s be honest, it’s not going to be World war 3 anytime soon.


Anyways I would appreciate some advice. And thank you for your knowledge and time.
 
Royal Lancers recruitment is East Anglia, not much difference as far as I can see.
All Donkey Wallopers, then again I am bias,..... MiB all the way.

Piss taking aside, RAC it beats walking.
 

AlienFTM

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However the one problem is that I don’t think the Light Dragoons recruit from the south. They’re called the cavalry of the North.
Officially they may be England's Northern Cavalry. In fact , since the other two Light Cav Regiments are Scots DG and QDG (Welsh), LD these days are also known as England's Light Cavalry. Don't get hung up on regionalisation. It was only introduced during Armour's golden years in 1958 (Mallinson, Light Dragoons, I think) when we had so much armour, we could recuit locally like the infantry. It's pretty meaningless again.

Even in the golden years, we had cockneys, scousers, Bennies, etc.
 
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Officially they may be England's Northern Cavalry. In fact , since the other two Light Cav Regiments are Scots DG and QDG (Welsh), LD these days are also known as England's Light Cavalry. Don't get hung up on regionalisation. It was only introduced during Armour's golden years in 1958 (Mallinson, Light Dragoons, I think) when we had so much armour, we could recuit locally like the infantry. It's pretty meaningless again.

Even in the golden years, we had cockneys, scousers, Bennies, etc.
But Alan Mallinson was a ‘Milkman’: or have I misunderstood your post.
Anyway MiB!
 

AlienFTM

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But Alan Mallinson was a ‘Milkman’: or have I misunderstood your post.
Anyway MiB!
Mallinson transferred from Infantry to 13/18H, where he became CO. When 15/19H amalgamated with 13/18H to become The Light Dragoons (spending the whole of the 1990s in the former Yugoslavia under the sobriquet "The Bosnia Hussars" as a result), I think he was already staff and formerly 13/18H. Whatever, we're in the same Regimental Association.

He was the perfect man to write Light Dragoons (all four original antecedent regiments had been Light Dragoons at some time or another), especially working at the MOD with access to histories. They also took Light Dragoons because the abortion the rest of the fractions made of making after amalgamation was avoided. As a 15/19H Facebook admin, I've had serving King's Royal Hussars applying to join because they don't know they're not derived from 15th/19th The King's Royal Hussars.

Unlike the infantry, the cavalry always knew the end of the Cold War would lead to loss of regiments, and just got on with it. 15/19H (Northumberland and Durham) and 13/18H (South Yorkshire) were a damn good fit. And made a good claim to "England's Northern Cavalry."

Thank God they didn't choose 13th/15th/18th/19th Hussars.
 
Your post is a great illustration of the twists and turns of regimental 'Identity', particularly when numbers are involved. 15 (Elliot's Light Horse) are the original LD, transformed into Hussars with 9, 12 and 18 by the time of the Napoleonic Wars.
 
@AlienFTM
Thanks for that. I hadn’t realised Alan had once dug trenches for a living. I didn’t meet him until he became DA in Rome (early 2000s). Nice chap and an excellent writer/historian. He was very much liked by the Italian CDS when he was at the Embassy.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
@AlienFTM
Thanks for that. I hadn’t realised Alan had once dug trenches for a living. I didn’t meet him until he became DA in Rome (early 2000s). Nice chap and an excellent writer/historian. He was very much liked by the Italian CDS when he was at the Embassy.
Dig trenches? An officer? Shudder. He must have loved the cavalry. First Parade then tea in the Mess.
 

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