Life in the Int Corp?

#1
Hello all,

I'm currently considering applying to the Int Corp and have a couple of questions about life in the ranks which I hope you can answer. If not, I rest assured that certain members will delight in pointing out the fathomless stupidity of my enquiries.

First, what are the resettlement opportunities really like? I'm currently going through the 'rubber stamp' process of an undergrad politics degree at a quality university. I have already gained some useful job seeking experince: heading a team of 20ish subs and 80ish underilngs on a publication with a large annual budget and circulation in the tens of thousands. Combined with a good internship I have a shot at a half-decent graduate job. How would my career prospects compare after a spell in the Int Corp? Is it PC repair courses for all?

Second, what is the Officer-Rank relationship like? As suggested on this board, does it really differ from the rest of the Army? For example are the ranks expected to staff Officers' Mess functions?

Third, what about day to day living? Do the ranks live in blocks? Do they suffer the ignominy of draconian block rules and inspections? I can accept that there needs to be discipline but being treated like a child doesn't appeal.

Int is really the only section of the Army that appeals. Having had the misfortune of spenting time with the dimwitted alcohol repositories of the OTC, attempting RCB is not for me. Any constructive replies much appreciated.

Cheers.
 
#2
You a Journo then?
 
#4
greenslime? said:
Third, what about day to day living? Do the ranks live in blocks? Do they suffer the ignominy of draconian block rules and inspections?
i take it that you think youre better than every other soldier in the British Army then!!
 
#7
Is that you again Jake???

Is cryptome down today or something??

greenslime? said:
First, what are the resettlement opportunities really like?
Glad to see that the ethos of duty and public service is alive and well in the 21st century.

Hasn't joined and he already wants to leave!!

Must really want to be a rupert :twisted:

ever heard of ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country ??http://www.bartleby.com/59/12/asknotwhatyo.html

The prognosis for a jack b@t@rd who starts off by thinking of himself first is that he will leave the Army with no mates, no social skills and no integrity.

Hmmm...perhaps there is a space in the DI 24 world????

If you can not hack it in the OTC bar, then the Army is not for you.

Then please move along smartly to the right Sir, and try the RAF
 
#8
Pretty much the response I expected.

Although you do have me there AntPhilip. My main reason for not pursuing the officer route is that Intelligence is the only section I’m interested in. I’m well versed in the need for good mental arithmetic etc I just couldn’t resist a jibe at the OTC.

“ever heard of ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country ??”


Yes, but it occurs to me that we’re not actually in Cold War America. Try using a quote relevant to the present day. There are other ways to serve your country than join the forces. OK, none of them involve dying but you can still provide a worthwhile commodity other than security. I will be pursuing public service that’s why I’m considering the Army. However, if it involves a shit quality of life and sweet f-a career options I think I’ll pass.

With regards to thinking about resettlement, I think it only prudent. A person who doesn’t plan their career is a fool. I’m sure your assumption that I’m a ‘jack bastard’ with no social skills makes you feel secure. Think what you like.

Oh, and if I was a journo I’d simply take a quote off the Int Corp website and spice it up into 250 words about the wonderful career opportunities and how ex-green slime pop up everywhere from the Telegraph website to that Travelocity guy. Come on guys, what’s the real deal?
 
#9
As someone who remembers the Kennedy era first hand, I certainly don't think that he was talking about the Cold War at the time.

As for me, I don't need to feel secure about what you, I, or anyone else thinks.

You have said enough about yourself already :wink:

Oh, and if I was a journo I’d simply......
If you were a journo you would know that some of the broadsheet commentators and Today Programme journalists have been know to defer to what they read round here.
 
#10
greenslime? said:
“ever heard of ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country ??”


Yes, but it occurs to me that we’re not actually in Cold War America. Try using a quote relevant to the present day. quote]

I think that is a relevant quote, not pandering to the selfish moronic clebrity obsessed standards of todays civil society.

Student Twat

Rant over
 
#13
Whiskybreath said:
Oi! Some of us are Proud of being Students (OK, so it's "again", but don't lump us with this t**t. :))
Whiskeybreath

One day when men were men, and snorkels were jackets, I overheard the man in the front of the Commer van remark that you had been there and got the T shirt some time ago. ( now you are after a second, or is it third??)

Like Seamus before you, I think there are some mature students we ex vegetables can always accommodate. :wink:

PS: Have you finished off that last bottle of "anti-septic mouthwash yet??"
 
#14
Well, I guess we’ve established that I’m not a journo.


It seems that I’m a student twat because I’ve dared to question your value system. Whatever.
 
#15
Well, that's done it. Whiskybreath's had an attack of nostalgia which he said could only be cured by the caress of greasy fake fur and orange nylon. He left a message on his TC-55 that he's legged it in search of 'mouthwash'.
I have it on good authority that this is his second expedition into spotty studenthood; he expects to be a master at debating or something.
He also left a message to 'greenslime?', saying something about getting a grip....what did you expect in here.....rubber johnny ...... mumble...
 
#16
First, what are the resettlement opportunities really like? I'm currently going through the 'rubber stamp' process of an undergrad politics degree at a quality university. I have already gained some useful job seeking experince: heading a team of 20ish subs and 80ish underilngs on a publication with a large annual budget and circulation in the tens of thousands. Combined with a good internship I have a shot at a half-decent graduate job. How would my career prospects compare after a spell in the Int Corp? Is it PC repair courses for all?
You're planning to leave before even joining then? As for your mention about 'underlings' I would suggest that you do not use that phrase in the presence of a soldier, espesially if you are lumping him in with the term. A soldier is not an 'underling', he is a god amongst men and will happily cary out a godlike act on your face to make you realise the error of your words.
In short you come accross as a bored wannabe who is more concerned about what they can get out of the army for their own personal gain than someone who is willing to give their all for an organisation which you know little or nothing about.

Hang on!! If you work on a 'publication' with a circulation that DOES make you a journalist does it not?
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#17
On arriving at Chicksands for trade training, all Int Corps (there's an 's' at the end Greenslime) soldiers are accommodated in apartments modelled on the luxury Mayfair penthouses which they will be living in when they have passed out and been promoted to Lance Corporal. Facilities include underground shooting range and off-street parking for the Aston-Martin, as well as a pirhana-filled moat and retractable drawbridge in case of snap inspections by pesky officers and SNCOs. At breakfast, all recruits parade in their Hugh Hefner style silk dressing gowns before dressing for the day's work in Saville Row tailored luxury worsteds, specially made to hide the bulge of the Walther PPK and shoulder holster under the left arm, and the nerd-pack of permanent superfine Lumocolors in the right inside pocket. After a tiring mornings hard graft with M and Q, it's usual to have a sports afternoon on the golf course, discussing Nazi gold bullion with sinister Germans and watching their oversized oriental caddies decapitating the statuary. After a shower - and maybe a sauna - its into the dinner jacket and down to the Junior Ranks Casino, for a vodka martini, shaken not stirred, and an eveing at the Chemin de Fer table swapping crude sexual innuendoes with the female recruits, including Ptes galore and Moneypenny etc etc etc.
 
#18
Punk - very amusing - cheered me up immensely.

Now to business. I suspect that 'Greenslime' has a view about life in the Int Corps that is not entirely commensurate with reality.

Life in the Corps is largely a clerk's life - masses of paperwork, maintaining files and operating computers. About 5% of the Corps have a genuinely 'sneaky' job dealing with things you'll be told about as and when (and if) you decide to join. There are no assignments to foreign embassies and amazing laser watches on offer. Well, not yet, anyway.

I'm frankly baffled that self-titled 'Slimes' does not fancy RCB et al. As you will see if you dig around elsewhere, RCB has nothing to do with either 'alcohol fuelled insanity' or intelligence - it is about raw leadership ability. Given that you will complete trade training at Chicksands with a stripe, you are still going to need a modicum of leadership ability. Perhaps you could try growing up a little as well - junior elements of the glorious Corps often find themsleves briefing to a very high level - immaturity and inability to deal with the real world aren't going to help you here.

There's nothing wrong with asking about resettlement packages at this stage. Unless you are completely army barmy (like me), the Army is just a job for the vast majority of people - a job they will leave after a period of service to seek fresh challenges. Do not think that service with the Corps automatically qualifies you for entry to MI5 or SIS. Apart from crap pay, these people can, and do, recruit some seriously high powered brainiacs, some of whom manage to serve their country faithfully without becoming fat waters who write crap books about their time there. The vast majority of Corps leavers go and work for locksmith companies, private security firms (and I don't mean GB/CP work) and everything in between.

So Slimes, where doe that leave you? I suggest you open your mind. I suggest you think very carefully about the Corps. Having a degree in the Coprs these days is nothing - it has always attracted a specific type of individual. Remember that you are still joining the Army - if you can't bear to live in close confines with other soldiers, how do you possibly hope to survive training, let alone operational reality??
 
#19
On the assumption that you're not a journo and bearing in mind that I left five years ago, there are some things it'd be well to consider:

a. The Corps does some interesting stuff, but mainly it's pretty mundane and ho-hum and the training is designed to make it so - for very good reasons.

b. While the Corps is in many ways a bit more relaxed than some other bits of the Army (I was a transferee myself, so I know!), it's still the Army, with all that implies. Higher standards of conduct and integrity are expected of the Corps soldier and a high degree of self-discipline under sometimes quite trying circumstances is required.

c. There are some cracking jobs, but as noted above, it's highly unlikely they'll lead to anything in particular outside, unless one is either very fortunate or willing to think very carefully about life After The Army. Resettlement is identical to the rest of the Services.

d. It's not for everyone. It can be a very bitchy and highly political environment and the Corps is small enough that it can be highly incestuous, as well. A bad reputation can be very hard to get rid of, no matter how ill-deserved it is or was.

e. If you're after personal advantage and career points for afterwards - and nothing wrong with that, incidentally - then you should consider RCB/Sandhurst. You probably won't do much pure intelligence, but you will be far better positioned for a running start on the out if you leave with less than 20 years' service and a mass of experience.

I don't much care why you want to join - my own reasons for joining back in the day were a trifle more idealistic, but it was a different world then - but would encourage you to do so. I had a great time and, while I'm glad to be doing something else (for a lot more cash, it has to be said), I'm equally glad and proud to have done what I did. Given my time over, I'd do it all again.
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#20
Calypso said:
Life in the Corps is largely a clerk's life - masses of paperwork, maintaining files and operating computers.
I'm not entirely sure that this phrase gives the right impression: although a good deal of the work is unavoidably clerical in nature, the actual task is information processing and the clerical aspects are a means to an end. Otherwise, I agree with what Calypso - and Glad_its_all_over - say.

Can I add, there are quite a few NCOs/WOs in the Corps who are or were undoubtedly officer material and who didn't go down that route. I'm pretty sure that, with the required voltage flowing through their testicles, many will admit that they wish they had at least tried RCB when they had the chance.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
N Int Corps 54
P Int Corps 13
territoriallybarmy Int Corps 9

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top