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Life Expectancy

#1
Does anybody know what the life expectancy is for a 22 year leaver?? Cos I feel like crap. Am I dying or just under the weather?
 
#2
It is better than serving 37 years - these statistics ARE looked at by the MoD - why not ask under the FOI Act to the Surgeon General. 8)

As a guide - the longer you serve the less chance you have of living too full retirement. :twisted:
 
#3
Fifteen years life expectancy after 22 years hard living!!
No idea were I got the figure from but I seems to be the number that comes up frequently

B*llocks to the pension! most of you ain't gonna be around to pick it up.
Please feel free to correct me at any time

toodle pip
The Gimp
 
#4
thegimp said:
Fifteen years life expectancy after 22 years hard living!!
No idea were I got the figure from but I seems to be the number that comes up frequently

B*llocks to the pension! most of you ain't gonna be around to pick it up.
Please feel free to correct me at any time

toodle pip
The Gimp
Oddly enough Gimp, I think you might be right about the pension!! rumour has it that you could soon be able to take massive payoff and no pension, similarly, feel free to correct me.
 
#6
Three years after leaving, and in my early 40's, I nearly quit the scene after my years of heavy smoking and drinking had furred up an artery in the ticker to the 'very unhealthy' point, so much so that I've got considerably less of it working now. Much angst for a while. Still active 8 years later, mind, even if there's the occasional panicked trip to the nearest cardio department in the belief that WB's time's finally up. You (almost) get used to it - whoa!, there's an ectopic beat!

If you let it get you down you know you've lost your sense of humour.

Noli illegitimi carborundum.
 
#7
Don't know how many other peeps have heard this stat, but I have heard that the number of folks doing 22 years in the Army pegging it before they are 55 is approx 40% (F&*cking horrendous stat if accurate!).

If anyone can prove, or disprove this theory, please do so. Incidentally, one of my old trade training Sgts did his 22 and died at 50 about 2 months ago - pretty spooky! (But he knew jack sh1t about the president, so it can't be a conspiracy!)
 
#8
El Gringo said:
Don't know how many other peeps have heard this stat, but I have heard that the number of folks doing 22 years in the Army pegging it before they are 55 is approx 40% (F&*cking horrendous stat if accurate!).
Actually 40% of the people who leave the army after 22 years aged 40 REACH 55. The figure that peg it is then obviously 60%!
 
#11
I remember when I got out that they were reducing the lump sums paid out on retirement. Apparently stats showed that many retirees died not long into retirement and where the many had commuted (?) the majority of their pension this meant millions more were paid out than would have been necessary. I think there will be increased pressure to limit lump sums.
 
#13
I remember receiving a lecture from some Pay & Pensions people. They said that the reason officer's pensions are so good is that, after retiring at 55, 70% do not get to see their 63rd Birthday! It seems that a lifetime of hard drinking, smoking and eating followed by a sudden lack of exercise on retirement are the major factors.
 
#16
Soldier_Why said:
Actually 40% of the people who leave the army after 22 years aged 40 REACH 55. The figure that peg it is then obviously 60%!
I've heard this before, but never actually seen any evidence to back it up and suspect that it's an urban myth. Has anyone got anything at all to go on.

p.s. my old man was a squaddie too (15 yrs in the RHF) and died at 57 (but looked about 70).
 
#17
I was thinking about this the other day.

Remember hearing a few years ago that the average life expectancy of someone who'd completed 22 was 53 years of age, therefore saving HMG a few bob on the full pension gig at 55.

However fairly recently the life expectancy crept passed the magical 55 and what do you know? The pension scheme was changed; coincidence?

Anyway, if I do VEng will it buy me another 2 years when I get out?!??!?
 
#18
There could well be some juice in looking at this from a qualitative research point of view.

the army as a large organisation with a very close organisational culture (to say the least) is a prime candidate for institutionalization. Obviously those who stay in for the full term are going to be more exposed to this culture, and they have self selected to be in the full term (which means they prefer to be in than out) so, when out these will experience more life difference than those who have only done a few years. this might seem commonsensical, but there has been a fair amount of research on this phenomenon, it is a recognised problem. Suddenly, the old boy is alone, has no routine to follow, gets frowned on for being himself, is acutely aware that actually no one gives a ## about him, starts pining to go back. big, big life stressor.
 
#19
Good post detmold. Sums up why I'll be joining just about every club and group I can when I get out.I reckon that feeling of purpose and belonging will be a big miss. It sounds a bit poxy but not something to be scoffed at.
 
#20
RI... It doesnt sound poxy at all.

My old man was a lifelong soldier. He left the army on compassionate grounds (he was due out to retire soon anyhow), to look after mum in her final days. He lasted a year "out" before he followed her. So he was a lifelong soldier in every meaning of the word.

This is all very grim.. I dont mean to sound so negative, but I dont want to sound presumptous on here. I have never been in the army (or any of the forces for that matter) Actually, I am the exact opposite. I have been self employed my entire life, basicly have never been employed at all !
What that means (to me at any rate) is there is no meaning to my job. Its just about money, nothing else. I am a skilled craftsman, but if someone paid me a stupid rate to tidy up their garden I would do it. In my world, everyone is out for themselves, no loyalty. Its not personal, its just business (as the mafia say)... I have close personal contacts with traders who I do a large amount of business with..and who I have known 20 years. but I know that they would be in India / China in a heartbeat if they knew and could replicate certain methods/processes that I use.So, everyone in my business life is in it for themselves as well !

What old soldiers need to be aware of is that this is "civistreet". They have lived a life of service, muddling in together to sort stuff out, not poaching points against each other to brown nose certain bosses etc and that this can well be very far from the norm elsewhere.
 

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