Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Life could be getting a little easier for the ‘Grunt’.

The better to force your 1944 pattern helmet over your eyes, and the sights on your Self Loading Rifle to 600m if you should ever have the temerity to assume a prone fire position.

Brilliant ergonomics, Brit stylie.

Didn’t you dump your pack when required to fight like you were supposed to? We did.
 
Didn’t you dump your pack when required to fight like you were supposed to? We did.
Not taught at RMAS or Warminster.

Less than easy to do in a hurry, IIRC, with that odd hooky/D-ring arrangement, in any case.

Good to know that the enemy you were training against was happy to oblige you with advance notice of when you'd be required to fight like you were supposed to :-D
 
The better to force your 1944 pattern helmet over your eyes, and the sights on your Self Loading Rifle to 600m if you should ever have the temerity to assume a prone fire position.

Brilliant ergonomics, Brit stylie.

Not just the large pack, the universal frame did that too. The joy of being dicked to carry the 351 as Platoon Signaller, and the inability to lift your head up if you lay down whilst being under 6'5"...
 
Not taught at RMAS or Warminster.

Less than easy to do in a hurry, IIRC, with that odd hooky/D-ring arrangement, in any case.

Good to know that the enemy you were training against was happy to oblige you with advance notice of when you'd be required to fight like you were supposed to :-D

Lympstone, mid eighties.

To be fair, we only used the large pack for the first few months. Once we hit the Commando Course we changed to Berghaus Centurions, which were a lot easier to throw off.
 

Mufulira

War Hero
Not just the large pack, the universal frame did that too. The joy of being dicked to carry the 351 as Platoon Signaller, and the inability to lift your head up if you lay down whilst being under 6'5"...
IIRC the Saffie Paras used a small jeep-like, air droppable carrier "Jakkal" to tote around heavy stuff like ammo resupply, mortar bombs, water. It was used on the Cassinga operation and did quite well but it didn't have a long range capability and was probably left behind and booby-trapped for after action looters.
 
I'm a never served type that likes mouching about in moist places observing stuff and occasionally enabling life changing experiences to stuff that is edible or eats stuff before I like call dibs.
The way I look at it is if something is trying to kill Moi the more fire power and sustainable options I carry would leave me exhausted and upset. Obviosly Duck,Hare ,Deer and Pikies don't have thumbs or pouches so I make every round count. Surpressive fire lasts as long as the target can stand
 
I was 11 in ‘76.

We didn’t have to buy our Centurions in ‘85, we drew them from stores
By that time, so did we (AMF(L) Bn), but the Berghaus brand had changed hands at least once, and quality took a hit. I lost count of the number of troops (me among them) whose Berghaus kit shed essential things like shoulder straps because the stitching unravelled.

We got PLCE in time for my second arctic stint.
 
Kenneth McAlpines,'We Died with our Boots Clean', might interest you.
Damn good read.

Just reading about a US Marine who landed on Guadalcanal , first wave.

He and his other riflemen landed with a Springfield .03 cerca WW 1, 5 clips of 5 rounds or maybe six rounds, a water bottle and that was it.

Wrote that if they had not found supplies of Rice the Japs left behind they would have starved as the supply ships all moved away when the Japs started bombing and straffing them at anchor.
 

Dubb_al_Ibn

War Hero
Bought a Cyclops Roc in 1982 before a tour in South Armagh and only this year binned it as the bottom had rotted through. Nothng special about it; just a big sack, really, but it was such an improvement on the '58 pattern large pack that were supposed to cope with at the time.

Patrols company on the same tour all bought "Jaguars" (Karrimor ?) if my memory serves me correctly. Having to buy your own kit... British Army. eh ?
 
Still got mine...:-D
Mine went via eBay about 5years ago, to a guy based on one of the Scottish isles, and wanted a sturdy, large rucsac for some serious walking expedition. I'd have to check my selling history to see if I still have a note of the countries and distances he planned to cover.
 
The Viet Cong headed south down the Ho Chi Minh trail with an AK, a 122mm round and some rice balls with fish sauce wrapped in a scarf and slung over their shoulder.

They did reasonably well...
 
Bought a Cyclops Roc in 1982 before a tour in South Armagh and only this year binned it as the bottom had rotted through. Nothng special about it; just a big sack, really, but it was such an improvement on the '58 pattern large pack that were supposed to cope with at the time.

Patrols company on the same tour all bought "Jaguars" (Karrimor ?) if my memory serves me correctly. Having to buy your own kit... British Army. eh ?


Nothing new, back in the early seventies, we bought our own boots, German Para, calf skin lined, high boots laced up to the top, totally waterproof, I still have mine, some lads got away with doc martins, and German parkas, I got a sheepskin lined sleeveless jerkin, blind eyes were turned, as most of the issue kit was not up to German winters. One lad got away with wearing an Aussie slouch hat in summer, he was a Dett commander, usually in an isolated Rebro out station. I had, and still have a 1944 No4 lee Enfield bayonet, which I fitted to my webbing, nothing was ever said. Different times, different mind-sets.
 
The Viet Cong headed south down the Ho Chi Minh trail with an AK, a 122mm round and some rice balls with fish sauce wrapped in a scarf and slung over their shoulder.

They did reasonably well...

Think I did a mad ex with two CG rounds and a ginsters pasty - would that be the same ?
 

Latest Threads

Top