Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Life could be getting a little easier for the ‘Grunt’.

Dubb_al_Ibn

War Hero
Just as you've got all your kit stowed and ready to go off on patrol there's always a Q-type who turns up in the harbour area (or whatever) and says, " Your lads need to take two 81mm rounds each and drop them off as you pass the mortar lines." Yeah, we'll just put them in a spare belt pouch (!). Then he mentions spare radio batteries....

I'm sure there was some Roman centurion making the same complaint 2000 years ago.
 
Just as you've got all your kit stowed and ready to go off on patrol there's always a Q-type who turns up in the harbour area (or whatever) and says, " Your lads need to take two 81mm rounds each and drop them off as you pass the mortar lines." Yeah, we'll just put them in a spare belt pouch (!). Then he mentions spare radio batteries....

I'm sure there was some Roman centurion making the same complaint 2000 years ago.

Things never change, units would try and offload a half a barmine, 200 link or mortars on my team. Infantry officers make very funny faces when you tell them, “no sir, not happening”.
 
Somewhere in the depths of all my military tat, is a copy issued to us of the SOP7 kit list, it must be about 3 feet long, I will dig it out and post it, you new lot think you are having a hard time, spare a thought for the BAOR steel jawed, straight backed defenders of boxhead land.
 

Dubb_al_Ibn

War Hero
Somewhere in the depths of all my military tat, is a copy issued to us of the SOP7 kit list, it must be about 3 feet long, I will dig it out and post it, you new lot think you are having a hard time, spare a thought for the BAOR steel jawed, straight backed defenders of boxhead land.

We had an RAF BALO at Bde HQ (non-mechanised). Great bloke but not very "physical" when it came to deployments with all his optic gear and UHF radios. He turned up on one exercise with a wheeled golf caddy, dumped all his and his signaller's kit in that and trotted off pulling it as if he was going to play 18 holes. CofS saw him and shook his head, thought for a moment and then said, "That's not a bad idea."

(I presume BALOs are now called JTACs, or something)
 
Re. the VC and the Ho Chi Minh trail; it wasnt as simple as each man walking from Hanoi to Saigon, carrying his own grub and weapon. The North set up dedicated way stations all along the trail, so that each person would cover, say, 12 km a day, if they were destined for the South. If not, they simply carried supplies or pushed a reinforced bike along a short portion of the route and offloaded the warload before returning for more. Along the way were field hospitals, rest stations, vehicle parks, gun parks, ammunition stores, ration and water stores, maintenance shops and route repair gangs. All surface movement stopped when enemy aircraft were heard or seen and dedicated camouflage teams worked to keep the cover intact. The North would often move NVA forces by vehicle, especially the combat units, if they could avoid detection from the air, primarily to keep the forces from wearing themselves out by route marching. The Viet Cong were used more as route maintenance troops than fighting troops as the war went on
 
Things never change, units would try and offload a half a barmine, 200 link or mortars on my team. Infantry officers make very funny faces when you tell them, “no sir, not happening”.
My experience is that infantry officers don't like contrary opinions from anyone in a corps. They especially don't like it when that corps bod is a NCO/WO. They are truly indoctrinated that they are literally in charge and what they say goes, until you show them that it doesn't and offer a better alternative: Suddenly you become their bezzer and can't shake them off.
 
Re. the VC and the Ho Chi Minh trail; it wasnt as simple as each man walking from Hanoi to Saigon, carrying his own grub and weapon. The North set up dedicated way stations all along the trail, so that each person would cover, say, 12 km a day, if they were destined for the South. If not, they simply carried supplies or pushed a reinforced bike along a short portion of the route and offloaded the warload before returning for more. Along the way were field hospitals, rest stations, vehicle parks, gun parks, ammunition stores, ration and water stores, maintenance shops and route repair gangs. All surface movement stopped when enemy aircraft were heard or seen and dedicated camouflage teams worked to keep the cover intact. The North would often move NVA forces by vehicle, especially the combat units, if they could avoid detection from the air, primarily to keep the forces from wearing themselves out by route marching. The Viet Cong were used more as route maintenance troops than fighting troops as the war went on

All true. But the result of this was that Charlie could indeed ‘fight light’.
 
When the VC or NVA quartermaster issues you your black pyjamas or regular Forces uniform and tells you not to look for a new one for 5 years...
 
All true. But the result of this was that Charlie could indeed ‘fight light’.

For the first 24 hours, then what happened to them. Look at the Tet offensive. First 12 hours were great, as they hit unprepared targets, then it all went to shite as the heavy mob turned round an walloped them.
 

morsk

LE
For the first 24 hours, then what happened to them. Look at the Tet offensive. First 12 hours were great, as they hit unprepared targets, then it all went to shite as the heavy mob turned round an walloped them.
Like the entire war
















(snigger)
 
Interesting idea (I think it may have been discussed earlier in this thread):


Screengrab:

Screenshot_20200131-184944.png
 
I thought the whole idea of carrying kit on your back was that you had both hands free to operate your rifle.

Or is the plan to have a Sherpa section in each platoon?
 
Interesting idea (I think it may have been discussed earlier in this thread):


Screengrab:

View attachment 447070
Brilliant.

Until you encounter hedgerows.

Any fule kno dat (if they've worked South Armagh on foot).

Possibly not so clever in the paddy fields of somewhere like Vietnam, either.

The more I think about this (Friday night, knackered, pint in hand) the more I'm inclined to think it's gonna have limited utility, just as the arctic pulk does.
 

GrumpyOG

Old-Salt
Deffo not crap (well the brakes were a bit lacking from high speed!), bloody fast in a straight line - one copper clocked us at over 130mph on the way to a job and way better than the DAF 45 bread vans that replaced them


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Top