Libya's new leader calls for state based on sharia law

#1
The chairman of Libya’s transitional government gave his first public address in Tripoli on Monday, exhorting thousands of cheering Libyans in the central square to support a democratic system that honours Islam, respects the rule of law and repudiates the personality cult of Moammar Gadhafi.

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Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, the transitional government leader, addressed a rowdy crowd of thousands in Martyrs Square in central Tripoli, a site that until recently was famous for pro-Gadhafi rallies. Flanked by a few dozen revolutionary leaders in their largest public gathering since rebel forces stormed into the capital on Aug. 21, he called on Libyans to build a state based on the rule of law.

“No retribution, no taking matters into your own hands and no oppression. I hope that the revolution will not stumble because of any of these things,” he said.

“We will not accept any extremist ideology, on the right or the left,” Mr. Abdul-Jalil added. “We are a Muslim people, for a moderate Islam, and will stay on this road.”

“We strive for a state of the law, for a state of prosperity, for a state that will have Islamic sharia law the basis of legislation.”

The speech capped a day of new international recognition of the rebel National Transitional Council as Libya’s legitimate government, as well as reminders that Col. Gadhafi and his followers remain a threat to that government’s stability.

Earlier, forces loyal to Col. Gadhafi attacked an important oil refinery at the Mediterranean port of Ras Lanuf, and the transitional government said at least 15 anti-Gadhafi fighters had died. But in a hopeful sign for the council, China, the last major power to withhold recognition of its legitimacy, officially changed positions and accepted it.

Abdulrahman Busin, a spokesman for the council’s military operations, said the loyalist attack on Ras Lanuf was apparently a response to news that the council had taken steps to restart oil production, which had been one of the country’s major contributors of income before the conflict began. He said that forces allied with the council were still fighting loyalists to bring an industrial area in Ras Lanuf back under control. “We have them surrounded,” he said.

The transitional government has not revealed which of the country’s oil facilities are working again, but has said it was attempting to get all reopened as soon as possible. Ras Lanuf is one of Libya’s main oil installations.

There were other indications Monday that efforts to declare complete victory over Col. Gadhafi and his holdouts were moving slowly or stalled. NATO, which helped the rebel forces in a bombing campaign against Col. Gadhafi’s military, said its work remained unfinished in Libya. Two days have passed since a deadline for remaining Gadhafi loyalists to surrender, with no indication that they have lost their will to fight.

And while leading figures of the deposed government and Col. Gadhafi’s family have fled – his son Saadi Gadhafi was the latest to escape, seeking sanctuary in Niger over the weekend – Col. Gadhafi’s whereabouts remained unknown. Al-Rai, a television channel based in Syria that has become a conduit for pro-Gadhafi messages, broadcast a statement Monday that it said had been written by Col. Gadhafi, denouncing his Libyan adversaries as traitors and vowing: “We will not surrender Libya to colonialism.”

Libya's new leader calls for state based on sharia law - The Globe and Mail
 
#2
"Just out of sarcasm"

I would like to Thank the Christian crusaders of Nato, for bringing peace and progression into Libya. I would like to Thank the Western Europeans for bringing justice to the people of Libya, we have for decades fought for the right to publicly lash women of all ages who are caught without wearing a Burqa, for years we have been prosectuted by Qaddafis forces for being proud of using children as suicide bombers, for years our rights to become Martyars in the name of Al Islam Al Jihad were oppressed by Qaddafi and his educated henchmen, Oh dear Western Europeans, due to your courageous assistance in our cause to spread a barbaric version of Islam to the whole world we will commence without any opposition on the ground nor air, I would also like to thank you for giving us access to slaughter all education,secular minded and progressive people of Libya, due to your kind consideration to our Global Jihadi Nationalism, we will enjoy this War booty of Black African migrant workers, whom we will treat no lesser than the relatives of the Moh's Jew sex slave Rayhana in Arabia.

Again, We all in Alqueda would like to thank you, however we are sorry for killing a couple of 100 of your soldeirs in Iraq, life doesnt get any better, does it.
 
#5
AK, your bias is appalling and tedious.

I remember you calling Gadaffi's former government "progressive"...
and maybe you should read your own article:

“We will not accept any extremist ideology, on the right or the left,” Mr. Abdul-Jalil added. “We are a Muslim people, for a moderate Islam, and will stay on this road.”

yes, he said 'based' on sharia law.
our law is based on christian law, it's still very secular though. just depends how far it goes.

here's the BBC's take on it.

The head of the National Transitional Council has delivered his first speech in Libya's capital, Tripoli, since the ousting of Muammar Gaddafi.

Mustafa Abdul Jalil outlined his plans to create a modern democratic state based on "moderate Islam" to thousands of flag-waving supporters in the newly renamed Martyrs' Square.

Earlier, Col Gaddafi vowed in a TV message to fight "until victory".

The whereabouts of the 69-year-old fugitive leader remain unknown.

"All that remains for us is the struggle until victory and the defeat of the coup," Col Gaddafi was cited as saying in a statement read out by a presenter on a loyalist television station.

Although the interim administration has promised the formation of a transitional government in Libya within 10 days, there are still big challenges in stabilising the country, says the BBC's Peter Biles in Tripoli.

Anti-Gaddafi forces now control most of Libya but loyalists are still holding out in the towns of Sirte and Bani Walid, offering fiercer resistance than had been expected.

Meanwhile, Amnesty International has called on the NTC to take steps to prevent human rights abuses by anti-Gaddafi forces.

'You are our weapon'

In his first speech since moving to the capital from the NTC stronghold of Benghazi, Mr Jalil told some 10,000 supporters to avoid retribution attacks, adding that Libya's new leaders would not accept any extremist ideology.

"We are a Muslim nation, with a moderate Islam, and we will maintain that. You are with us and support us - you are our weapon against whoever tries to hijack the revolution," he said.

He said women would play an active role in the new Libya, and thanked a number of nations - including France and Britain - for supporting the NTC.

His words, broadcast live on television, were met with rapturous applause, as fireworks illuminated the Tripoli waterfront.

But Mr Jalil and his colleagues still face major hurdles, adds our correspondent, not least because the fugitive leader remains at large.

Many of his inner circle have fled to neighbouring countries such as Algeria or Niger.

Niger's Prime Minister Brigi Rafini said on Monday Saadi Gaddafi and three of his father's generals were among 32 people who had crossed the lengthy desert border into the central African nation since 2 September.

The NTC has also to quell Gaddafi loyalists who are holding out in the last bastions of support for the fugitive leader inside Libya.

Fighting in Bani Walid south-east of the capital was halted on Monday, with one commander telling the BBC they were waiting for Nato warplanes to continue airstrikes targeting heavy weapons being used by pro-Gaddafi forces inside the town.

Fifteen guards were also killed when pro-Gaddafi forces attacked an oil refinery near the town of Ras Lanuf.

'Disappearances and torture'

In its latest report, Amnesty International says that while the bulk of violations were carried out by loyalist forces, anti-Gaddafi fighters have also been involved in torture and revenge killings.

Amnesty said a full picture had yet to emerge, but said it had asked Libya's opposition leadership to take steps to rein in its supporters and investigate any abuses, and to combat xenophobia and racism.

"The NTC is facing a difficult task of reigning in opposition fighters and vigilante groups responsible for serious human rights abuses, including possible war crimes but has shown unwillingness to hold them accountable," says the report - entitled The Battle for Libya - Killings, Disappearances and Torture.

Mohammed al-Alagi, a justice minister for Libya's transitional authorities, said the rebels had made mistakes, but said these could not be described as "war crimes at all".
 
#6
How come people are surprised by this?

We should have learnt from Iraq and other regime changes in the middle east. Gadhafi wasn't my favourite character but at least we knew who he was. And at least he wasn't a muslim fanatic.

Another thing I find painfully obvious is that just like Afghan and Iraq, democracy is not on our "leaders" agenda. Syria are gunning down civies left, right and centre yet not one bomb is dropped on them. I wonder why?
 
#7
How come people are surprised by this?

We should have learnt from Iraq and other regime changes in the middle east. Gadhafi wasn't my favourite character but at least we knew who he was. And at least he wasn't a muslim fanatic.

Another thing I find painfully obvious is that just like Afghan and Iraq, democracy is not on our "leaders" agenda. Syria are gunning down civies left, right and centre yet not one bomb is dropped on them. I wonder why?
You live in your own little world don't you?
 
#9
Stupid **** (if I may).

The Libyan legal system has been based on Shariah law since 1973.

Abdul Jalil actually posited a legal system informed on Shariah, which is quite different, and is the standard for even moderate Arab countries. Many of the thuwwar I lived with wanted out-and-out hand-chopping shariah; others (especially in Benghazi) wanted a secular Napoleonic law code. Abdul Jalil has opted for a compromise.

Also: could you please stop starting posts about Libya, because it's quite clear you don't have a ****ing clue what you're on about.

Secondly: your limpid-eyed bacha-bazi sig block makes me look deeply gay surfing on Arrse at work. Could you bin it please?
 
#10
Slightly more thoughtfully:

Libya is a deeply conservative Muslim country. The most effective fighting forces in the country (Misrata and the Berber mountains) come from the most conservative poarts of the country.

The independent Libya that will evolve from the war will still be a conservative, moderately Islamist, deeply racist country. We knew that before we joined in. For a supposed Pashtun Muslim to try and scare us for allying with conservative Muslims- considering our Saudi and Bahraini allies- is ludicrous. Give it a ****ing rest. We're grown up enough not to hide under at the bed at the prospect of Muslims believing in Islam. For ****'s sake.
 
#11
How come people are surprised by this?

We should have learnt from Iraq and other regime changes in the middle east. Gadhafi wasn't my favourite character but at least we knew who he was. And at least he wasn't a muslim fanatic.

Another thing I find painfully obvious is that just like Afghan and Iraq, democracy is not on our "leaders" agenda. Syria are gunning down civies left, right and centre yet not one bomb is dropped on them. I wonder why?
Yeah Gaddafi was just misunderstood wasn't he? He armed the PIRA and sponsored the worst terrorist atrocity ever seen on these shores.

You're a muppet.
 
#15
“We will not accept any extremist ideology, on the right or the left,” Mr. Abdul-Jalil added. “We are a Muslim people, for a moderate Islam, and will stay on this road.”

“We strive for a state of the law, for a state of prosperity, for a state that will have Islamic sharia law the basis of legislation.”

Sounds good to me. We're a moderate christian nation, with laws (originally, and roughly) based on the bible. We seem to do OK.
 
#17
“We will not accept any extremist ideology, on the right or the left,” Mr. Abdul-Jalil added. “We are a Muslim people, for a moderate Islam, and will stay on this road.”

“We strive for a state of the law, for a state of prosperity, for a state that will have Islamic sharia law the basis of legislation.”

Sounds good to me. We're a moderate christian nation, with laws (originally, and roughly) based on the bible. We seem to do OK.
Like the non-religious Biblical law I suspect Sharia owes most of it's substance to ancient Mesopotamia.

(Well it's got to considering that a lot of it is copied from the Torah. Mohammed was remarkably well-read for an illiterate...)
 
#19
I'd have been very surprised if Sharia wasn't put forward as the basis of law in Libya, that form of words is a norm in the Arab world.

It does not in itself worry me. Liberated Iraq used it for instance, with enthusiastic support from most of its electorate. That is not why the place is a corrupt, sectarian, sinkhole gravitating towards Iran. If I was to take a lesson from Iraq it would be strong institutions have to grow from the ground up and an executive of rent seeking Ali Babas can wreck anything.

What Sharia as a legal foundation means in practice varies and is detailed in the law. That's a hot topic for the Islamists and they vary across a political scale like going from Christian Democrat to Aryan Brotherhood. In this Libya, unlike the last, they have a voice, some are also armed and influential. Abdul-Jalil, our anointed head of the NTC has little real power and a great deal of bargaining to do. Political Islam will probably play a much larger part than it did in Qaddafi's state.

If Libya ends up with a representative government I'd expect it to be a fairly reactionary state, with the usual oil subsidized welfare state and despite the part NATO played hostile to some western interests, hopefully not as much as Qaddafi was times.
 
#20
Yeah Gaddafi was just misunderstood wasn't he? He armed the PIRA and sponsored the worst terrorist atrocity ever seen on these shores.

You're a muppet.
I never said he was my hero. If he was so dangerous why were we not there during Operation Banner? Why were we selling him weapons?

All we have done is destabilize another country and armed another rebel force we don't even no. The rebels have committed crimes just as Gaddafi's forces have.

Who do you think armed the taliban?
 

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