Libya: SAS leads hunt for Gaddafi

Do you think that the decision to use SAS soldiers in Tripoli was right?

  • Absolutely right

    Votes: 52 54.7%
  • Rather right

    Votes: 14 14.7%
  • Rather wrong

    Votes: 5 5.3%
  • It is a wrong decision

    Votes: 24 25.3%

  • Total voters
    95
#1
Libya: SAS leads hunt for Gaddafi - Telegraph

For the first time, defence sources have confirmed that the SAS has been in Libya for several weeks, and played a key role in coordinating the fall of Tripoli.

With the majority of the capital now in rebel hands, the SAS soldiers, who have been dressed in Arab civilian clothing and carrying the same weapons as the rebels, have been ordered to switch their focus to the search for Gaddafi, who has been on the run since his fortified headquarters was captured on Tuesday.
Bt the way it is a violation of rules and customs of war. Soldier must have a uniform and bear weapons openly. Or being captured he would not have rights of a POW according to Vienna convention.

Do you think that the decision to use SAS soldiers in Tripoli was right?
 
#2
What makes you think it's true? The Balcony Rule states clearly that newspapers must claim all conflicts in which the UK is concerned, must involve operations by the SAS. It's a sort of time-honoured journalistic convention, like fiddling your expenses and being sick in taxis.
 
#4
Who gives a **** if its legal or not.

Simples.
 
#6
What makes you think it's true? The Balcony Rule states clearly that newspapers must claim all conflicts in which the UK is concerned, must involve operations by the SAS. It's a sort of time-honoured journalistic convention, like fiddling your expenses and being sick in taxis.
Freeman, The Daily Telegraph is well informed and serious edition with links to the decision making circles. So, being just an allegation not confirmed officially, the role of SAS in Libya, looks at least as not impossible.

Apparently so called "rebels" were helped in their storm of Tripoli. Months of the war showed them as rather armed gangs that are unable to perform more or less coordinated military operation.

So how the "rebels" managed to "capture Tripoli". No doubt foreign mercenaries used or foreign military or special forces were used.

If it is true, that SAS soldiers took part in the storm of Tripoli then it is possible that one of more of them missed. Maybe even they were captured by Gaddafi forces. In this case it could be a serious problem for HM government.
 
#8
So how the "rebels" managed to "capture Tripoli". No doubt foreign mercenaries used or foreign military or special forces were used.
Don't forget about the defection's from Gaddafi's military. Now they might not be a world-class military, but some input from the hundreds of defections might have helped. Plus, some rebels' will have had a period of National Service would they not?
 
#9
The Daily Telegraph is well informed and serious edition with links to the decision making circles.
I'm afraid you are a bit out of date.

The DTel USED TO BE well informed, serious, links etc etc, but hasn't been for some years now.

It's just a big print version of the D Mail nowadays, and not really to be trusted.
 
#10
If they catch him. Make sure he goes to an ENGLISH jail.
So that will be 2 years suspended and 150 hours of community service, plus house and benefits for all his family and hangers on.
 
#11
Don't forget about the defection's from Gaddafi's military. Now they might not be a world-class military, but some input from the hundreds of defections might have helped. Plus, some rebels' will have had a period of National Service would they not?
I strongly doubt that few defectors could plan and perform such a complex operation. The "rebels" still voided uniforms and are in fact armed gangs. with such an army you can plan a local or as maximum a tactical operation but not a storm of such a huge city as Tripoli.

But was Tripoli indeed captuted? It is not clear. Col.Gaddafi appeared more smart than one could think.
 
#12
One of the BBC defence correspondants said yesterday (along with a quip about now being banned from further MOD briefings) that the SAS were in Libya, but were more in an advisory role and the front line blending-in-with-locals tasks were being undertaken by Qatari (and other Arab nations) SF
 
#13
I strongly doubt that few defectors could plan and perform such a complex operation. The "rebels" still voided uniforms and are in fact armed gangs. with such an army you can plan a local or as maximum a tactical operation but not a storm of such a huge city as Tripoli.

But was Tripoli indeed captuted? It is not clear. Col.Gaddafi appeared more smart than one could think.
I'm not saying the rebels' aren't 'armed gangs'. I'm merely saying that maybe with the number of defectors from the regime, there will be a few people who could plan the best way to utilise the forces availiable to them.
 
#14
Why shouldn't he SAS be present? Let's face it there must be "representitives" there from several countries with an interest in the outcome.
 
#15
I'm afraid you are a bit out of date.

The DTel USED TO BE well informed, serious, links etc etc, but hasn't been for some years now.

It's just a big print version of the D Mail nowadays, and not really to be trusted.
Well, let's suppose that the story about SAS in Libya was invented by Telegraph's journalists. But why? The allegation is too serious to be absolutely unfounded. It is more probable that it is a planned leakage to prepare public opinion.
 
#16
"Freeman, The Daily Telegraph is well informed and serious edition with links to the decision making circles"

Thats the funniest thing I've heard all day - the DTs defence coverage is on the par with the average crayon armed toddler...

As for the SAS, I read the papers and based on this, is there any country in the world right now where a steely eyed team of death dealing, novel writing, portable balcony carrying jedi aren't plotting the imminent demise of local politicians and crooks?
 
#17
Libya: SAS leads hunt for Gaddafi - Telegraph



Bt the way it is a violation of rules and customs of war. Soldier must have a uniform and bear weapons openly. Or being captured he would not have rights of a POW according to Vienna convention.
Do you think that the decision to use SAS soldiers in Tripoli was right?
There hasn't been a declaration of war. This is a popular uprising to rebel against the dictator/leadership with the aim of ousting him and so lead to a change in the Government. It isn't a case of war with another country, it's an internal affair.
 
#19
There hasn't been a declaration of war. This is a popular uprising to rebel against the dictator/leadership with the aim of ousting him and so lead to a change in the Government. It isn't a case of war with another country, it's an internal affair.
The Hague and Geneva (signed by the UK and Libya) are applicable even if there is no formal declaration of war. For example

The Avalon Project : Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War; August 12, 1949

ARTICLE 2
In addition to the provisions which shall be implemented in peace time, the present Convention shall apply to all cases of declared war or of any other armed conflict which may arise between two or more of the High Contracting Parties, even if the state of war is not recognized by one of them.
More than a century ago laws and customs of war were worded this way

The Avalon Prject - Laws of War : Laws and Customs of War on Land (Hague IV); October 18, 1907

Article 1.
The laws, rights, and duties of war apply not only to armies, but also to militia and volunteer corps fulfilling the following conditions:

To be commanded by a person responsible for his subordinates;

To have a fixed distinctive emblem recognizable at a distance;

To carry arms openly; and

To conduct their operations in accordance with the laws and customs of war.

In countries where militia or volunteer corps constitute the army, or form part of it, they are included under the denomination "army."
So if the allegation made by the newspaper is true then SAS soldiers must wear British military uniforms in Tripoli. Being captured they would not be under protection of the Geneva conventions.
 
#20
"Freeman, The Daily Telegraph is well informed and serious edition with links to the decision making circles"

Thats the funniest thing I've heard all day - the DTs defence coverage is on the par with the average crayon armed toddler...

As for the SAS, I read the papers and based on this, is there any country in the world right now where a steely eyed team of death dealing, novel writing, portable balcony carrying jedi aren't plotting the imminent demise of local politicians and crooks?
"Well informed" means "sometimes is being used for unofficial comments by the MoD".
 

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