Leveson Report

#1
So the report is out lunch time, all 2000 pages.

So what will be the outcome, regulation of a free press? Will the UK become like France where politicians are very rarely exposed when having affairs or involved in financial scandals. Celebrities and sports stars can continue using the press to promote films, books or music but not be the subject of scrutiny when they are doing wrong.

I understand why the Press was reigned in, but I don't want to see the press shackled. Toughen up the press complaints procedure, make slander and libel cases more accessible, not something just for the rich, make the press print apologies and retractions as prominent as the original offending article by all means.

You try to regulate a free press and its another freedom lost.
 
#2
You reap what you sow, and the press has been sowing for years!

Not a fan of state regulation, but some form of meaningful consequence for p*ss poor journalism is needed.

Let's face it the press over react to everything, so why would they assume the public wouldn't as well?!!
 
#4
#6
They're just announcing the details now... It sounds as though he's been harsh enough, a new self-appointed body to regulate the press but it will be answerable to OFCOM.

I'd say... Ouch!
 
#7
Well there's a ****ing shocker.

The Met did nothing wrong. Hunt did nothing wrong. Lessons learned. Bla bla bla.

£4m down the pisser.
 
#8
Just had one of the 7/7 victims family on ITN.... He says it's gone too far!

This could be interesting.
 
#9
I am all for the freedom of the press, but when they report innocent people who have been arrested or "helping the poilce with there inquires) and found guilty by media, then the press should be taken to task, hacking into mobile phones just to appease celebrity sensationalists realy grips my shite.

And some seriously heavy fines should be brought on to the press for mis information!
 
#10
It's also kind of pointless insofar as it can only be applied to the UK Press.
 
#11

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#12
Well why would it need to be applied to the non-UK press?
Cos of something called "The Internet". Read comments on this stupidity in the media recently -Guido Fawkes in the NYT, and a good article in The Guardian.

The internet is simply not regulatable, unles you go down the road followed by China,Iran, etc.
 
#13
#15
Cos of something called "The Internet". Read comments on this stupidity in the media recently -Guido Fawkes in the NYT, and a good article in The Guardian.

The internet is simply not regulatable, unles you go down the road followed by China,Iran, etc.

Right on both counts. Which is a little worrying.
 
#17
Exactly. F**k off overseas to another country and run your blog/magazine online.....
It would be very difficult to establish a corrupting relationship with senior politicians from overseas without publishing anything domestically.

Also publishing overseas does not exempt one from the criminal law of the United Kingdom.
 
#18
It would be very difficult to establish a corrupting relationship with senior politicians from overseas without publishing anything domestically.

Also publishing overseas does not exempt one from the criminal law of the United Kingdom.
No, but it would exempt you from the remit of the suggested new press oversight body.
 
#20
Whilst the comments on overseas press are valid, I'd suggest that a story that's of major interest here is of little interest abroad. An 'Eastenders' star's indiscretion means ****-all to a readership in Jakarta, for instance.

Yes, you can publish from offshore but most of the bovine masses will still step out and buy/look online at the Currant Bun/Daily Hate/Grauniad, etc, and it's those that're under scrutiny here.
 

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