Letter writing

#1
I need to write a letter to my CO asking permission not to be somewhere. I know the general layout, but what is an appropriate closure to it. Do i do the usual ' i remain, Sir, you obediant servant'? Or is there something else. The online JSP 101 hasn't helped much.

Cheers in advance
 
#2
You could always use "Shove It".

Really, perhaps the simple 'Respectfully' might do or exactly like you say.

Have fun
 
#5
I know the definative guide is JSP 101 but the best way to write a letter to the CO is to get hold of a copy of one of his, that is the correct way relative to your unit/CO. As for the closure; I would a) speak to the Regt/Bn typist and see what they would advise or b) make an arrangement to speak to the Adjutant and see what they have to say (including the full content of the letter). Even if you are a Pte soldier I wouldn't be too concerned with too many formalities. What is probably more important is your justification and do you have support from above.

Good luck
 
#6
Nursienorth,

check your PM's

Worm
 
#8
Ronnie8781 said:
Not to be somewhere?

You mean going on tour?
Actually, no, I'm not a tour dodger, nor do i intend to be....so take your head out from your hoop and 'jog on'!
 
#9
Thanks for the advice peeps...i've gone with the 'kiss my hairy arse' option...thought it'd be appropriate since i have to wax it daily! I'm even gonna plait the hair for the occasion!
 
#10
nursienorth said:
I need to write a letter to my CO asking permission not to be somewhere. I know the general layout, but what is an appropriate closure to it. Do i do the usual ' i remain, Sir, you obediant servant'? Or is there something else. The online JSP 101 hasn't helped much.

Cheers in advance
I hope for your sake that was meant as a joke !
 
#11
[/quote]
I hope for your sake that was meant as a joke ![/quote]


Erm...no...why would it be a joke!
 
#12
The correct (traditional) closure is:

I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant

(note the apparently random use of capital letters)

JSP101 isn't much help because Defence Writing (DW) is supposed to be moving away from these hide-bound writ-in-stone templates and towards a more 21st Century, sensible approach where the emphasis is on presenting the correct information in a way that is clear, concise, appropriate and correctly spelt and punctuated.

In principle, therefore, there is no longer any such thing as a "Loose Minute", a "Demi-Official" letter, a "Routine letter" or a "Formal letter".

In practice, however, the vast majority of officers have had the old templates nailed (sometimes literally for a particularly harsh exampe of red-penning) into their brains and are unable to let them go without a fight.

IF
 
#15
nursienorth said:
combat_barbie said:
logical_log said:
nursienorth said:
Sir, you obediant servant'
I hope for your sake that was meant as a joke !
Lol. I hadn't noticed that when I first read it.
AGAIN>>>CAN SOMEONE TELL ME WHAT I'VE DONE WRONG!
Jesus, I would get someone to help you with the letter if you cant spot the simple mistake
 
#16
nursienorth said:
combat_barbie said:
logical_log said:
nursienorth said:
Sir, you obediant servant'
I hope for your sake that was meant as a joke !
Lol. I hadn't noticed that when I first read it.
AGAIN>>>CAN SOMEONE TELL ME WHAT I'VE DONE WRONG!

don't you mean Obedient and your, instead of you.
 
#17
nursienorth said:
combat_barbie said:
logical_log said:
nursienorth said:
Sir, you obediant servant'
I hope for your sake that was meant as a joke !
Lol. I hadn't noticed that when I first read it.
AGAIN>>>CAN SOMEONE TELL ME WHAT I'VE DONE WRONG!
Nursie,

Try "I am, Sir, your obedient servant."

That was a good example of how the absence of a single letter has a dramatic effect on the meaning of the sentence!

Litotes
 
#19
electric_citizen said:
Sorry Litotes but you have got it wrong as well. You have used too much punctuation and should lose the commas.

I am

Sir

your obedient servant.
Electric,

You leave out the commas and I will retain them, and I'll wager I am right. I have been writing those kind of letters for many years now!

Say the sentence out loud and insert the commas where you pause, if only momentarily.

I would quote JSP101 but that has long gone!

Litotes
 
#20
Litotes; unfortunately grammar and punctuation is an area that the services are behind compared with the civilian world. The Oxford English Press encourage us to use minimum punctuation where or when necessary. An example of how much we used can be found in newspapers or posters more than 10 years old.
 

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