Let's talk about Lowa..

On my second set of Patrol Boots and my third set of desert elites.
They get worn until the sole tread is gone and then replaced.
The old ones have gone on to become DIY boots at home
Mods they get are a set of superfeet to replace the insoles and laces trimmed down so there isn't any flapping about - with the elites, this means you can pop them on in a hurry if there is a flap in the night.
Their non-goretex civvie safety boots are okay, but don't match the ankle support of their military range
 
I bit the bullet and got a desert coloured pair off

Police, Military, Outdoor & Camping Equipment | Polimil

Cracking next day service despite putting the order in literally a minute before their cut off.

Zephyrs are a great fit for my wide plates, super comfy.

They seem almost overly padded across the tongue and I expect them to become a soggy saggy mess if they get wet and take days to dry out.

Hate the aesthetics of them though. I know looks shouldn’t count but they do

I think perhaps the higher leg version would appeal a bit more to me.

They are lighter than my normal boots though

In other news I got waist deep goffered by a freak wave last week and my lowa Hunter gtx are still ******* wet and pumping out salt stains.

So it’s been a while since I got em. First 5 miler with hound yesterday. A ******* joy to walk/trot along with. Great for rock hopping

Side effect, first week my feet have been out of solid boots for months. Plus surfed every day in neoprene boots and my feet feel like they have been beaten with sticks and got sore shins.
Just not used to the freedom and reduction in support. It’ll get better i’m Sure
 
I’m in the market for a new pair of 3 season boot. I have found a pair of Lowa renegade mid gtx boots that I like the look of.

Their main habitat would be home around the Derbyshire Peak District, with occasional jaunts to the lakes/N York’s/Northumberland.

The reviews I can see are US based, with longevity the big question mark, so my basic question is, anyone got a pair & if so are the worth a punt @ £90?
 
I’m in the market for a new pair of 3 season boot. I have found a pair of Lowa renegade mid gtx boots that I like the look of.

Their main habitat would be home around the Derbyshire Peak District, with occasional jaunts to the lakes/N York’s/Northumberland.

The reviews I can see are US based, with longevity the big question mark, so my basic question is, anyone got a pair & if so are the worth a punt @ £90?

Yes.

I have done the Dales, a few Munro’s, Brecon and even been in the Peak District. I would happily wear mine in any of those locations for day yomps - 3 season rules apply, snow, or frost and the leather one’s would come out.
 
Yes.

I have done the Dales, a few Munro’s, Brecon and even been in the Peak District. I would happily wear mine in any of those locations for day yomps - 3 season rules apply, snow, or frost and the leather one’s would come out.

Great stuff. I’ve ordered a pair.
 
When you get to the stage that your mountain GTX are knackered and you are thinking about binning them that is when you send them to Lowa. They will more or less rebuild/refinish the boot to good condition for much less than the cost of a new pair.

The certain boxheads get issued with the leather Lowa style boots. The contract for the boot is filled by Lowa, Meindl and Haix, you cannot tell who made the boot as they look identical made to contract standard. Mountain troops and speshul people get issued with the boot, as such everyone else thinks it is ally so they try and blag a pair from the QM. or spend their own money.

Holy thread resurrection.

I've got a pair of Lowa combat GTX and they've had a bit of hammer over the winter and I have watched both heels basically fall apart. Prior two two hours a day walking in wet conditions for 4 months, they stood unused for donkeys in a cupboard. Pretty piss poor performance for a military grade boot.

I've still got a pair of Boots Combat High lurking around somewhere from a thousand years ago and they performed stacks better than what I now feel is a useless and expensive pile of junk.

Well unimpressed.
 
I'm afraid that 'the stood unused in the cupboard for donkeys' that might have been the problem. I've seen it with issue boots that have come off the shelf after years and the soles crumbled or come apart in chunks.


Here's the article. Mine were stored in clean dry conditions. They have been used through-out the winter in the wet and cleaned afterwards and stored were they will dry quickly. So whilst mine are quite old, I'd contend that this shouldnt have happened.

Not much use in wet conditions. Fine for parade ground......


This is an ageing process which occurs over a number of years but which can be accelerated by certain factors. Damp and humid conditions are specific catalysts for hydrolysis as they increase the amount of contact the PU has with water molecules. For this reason, Hydrolysis is more likely to occur in leather boots which are worn in wet and muddy conditions without being cleaned afterwards. However, one of the most common factors accelerating hydrolysis in leather boots is actually lack of use. By leaving your leather boots at the back of a dark cupboard for too long, you’re increasing their exposure to moisture absorption and consequently hydrolysis.

When we witness the ‘sole-destroying’ moment the soles of our leather boots start to fall apart our first thought might be to blame the manufacturer. We might question if we have a faulty pair, particularly if the boots have only been worn a few times before. Unfortunately, this scenario is far more common than we might think and hydrolysis is the invisible culprit to blame. Whilst your leather boots are on holiday in the cupboard, hydrolysis is likely to be hard at work. As the PU in the leather boots is exposed to increasing amounts of moisture over time it becomes more porous allowing hydrolysis to get to work at destroying the PU in the soles. As the process of hydrolysis is invisible it is only when we notice the sole disintegrating that we can physically see its effects.

This is where the LOWA manufacturing process works in opposition to the damaging effects of Hydrolysis. All our leather boots are designed to be durable and resistant to damage and our production method enables this quality to be realised.

The soles of our leather boots are fitted with a protective edging called a rand which runs all the way around the edge of the boot in between the upper and the insole. The rand is a rubber edging which protects the leather from moisture and damage. Once the rand has been fitted, the PU midsoles can be assembled. The midsoles add an important element of cushioning to the sole which makes the leather boots comfortable and wearable. We ensure the sole is pre-treated and assembled with durability using one of two trusted methods. The sole is either cemented to the upper using a pneumatic press or attached to the upper using a LOWA-exclusive Monowrap frame rubber mould which PU is injected directly into. If this method is used the bonds are cured immediately in a cooling chamber to ensure optimum connectivity.

The spray-on glueing process that we use throughout the treatment of the outsoles is crucial to ensuring our leather boots are durable but also breathable. It is vital that air and moisture can flow freely out of the boots whilst maintaining their waterproof properties. With these considerations in mind, LOWA uses an exclusive spray-on glueing process which provides the strong connection these leather boots require whilst allowing the pores of the material to remain open and circulate moisture out of the boot.

How To Prevent Hydrolysis​

As durable as our leather boots are manufactured to be, it is crucial that they are cared for in the correct way to ensure this level of quality is maintained. To prevent the effects of hydrolysis we’ve put together a shoebox of tricks on how to store and care for your leather boots. In order to successfully combat the damaging effects of hydrolysis we recommend that you keep your leather boots clean and cool by doing the following:

- Store your leather boots in a dry and well-ventilated space

- Keep your leather boots away from sources of heat and avoid exposing them to high temperatures

- Clean your leather boots regularly, especially after walking through muck and manure

Providing the correct storage and care for your leather boots is crucial to ensuring they live a long and happy life. However, the wisest piece of advice which we can really give to keep your leather boots healthy is to get outdoors. Before longer trips take your leather boots on a short test run to check for signs of hydrolysis- this is particularly important if you know your boots have been hidden at the back of the cupboard for a while.

It’s crucial to remember that leather boots are designed to be worn in outdoor terrain and so the easiest way to prevent hydrolysis is to keep your boots moving in the open air. This way Hydrolysis doesn’t have the right conditions to wreak its usual havoc allowing the soles of your leather boots to remain intact. Whether it’s a hike, a trek or a short stroll, any outdoor activity will be doing those leather boots a massive favour.

With this advice and the right quality leather boots, hydrolysis shouldn’t be troubling you too much in the future. For more information on the durable footwear options available at LOWA please explore the products on our website.
 
Here's the article. Mine were stored in clean dry conditions. They have been used through-out the winter in the wet and cleaned afterwards and stored were they will dry quickly. So whilst mine are quite old, I'd contend that this shouldnt have happened.

Not much use in wet conditions. Fine for parade ground......


This is an ageing process which occurs over a number of years but which can be accelerated by certain factors. Damp and humid conditions are specific catalysts for hydrolysis as they increase the amount of contact the PU has with water molecules. For this reason, Hydrolysis is more likely to occur in leather boots which are worn in wet and muddy conditions without being cleaned afterwards. However, one of the most common factors accelerating hydrolysis in leather boots is actually lack of use. By leaving your leather boots at the back of a dark cupboard for too long, you’re increasing their exposure to moisture absorption and consequently hydrolysis.

When we witness the ‘sole-destroying’ moment the soles of our leather boots start to fall apart our first thought might be to blame the manufacturer. We might question if we have a faulty pair, particularly if the boots have only been worn a few times before. Unfortunately, this scenario is far more common than we might think and hydrolysis is the invisible culprit to blame. Whilst your leather boots are on holiday in the cupboard, hydrolysis is likely to be hard at work. As the PU in the leather boots is exposed to increasing amounts of moisture over time it becomes more porous allowing hydrolysis to get to work at destroying the PU in the soles. As the process of hydrolysis is invisible it is only when we notice the sole disintegrating that we can physically see its effects.

This is where the LOWA manufacturing process works in opposition to the damaging effects of Hydrolysis. All our leather boots are designed to be durable and resistant to damage and our production method enables this quality to be realised.

The soles of our leather boots are fitted with a protective edging called a rand which runs all the way around the edge of the boot in between the upper and the insole. The rand is a rubber edging which protects the leather from moisture and damage. Once the rand has been fitted, the PU midsoles can be assembled. The midsoles add an important element of cushioning to the sole which makes the leather boots comfortable and wearable. We ensure the sole is pre-treated and assembled with durability using one of two trusted methods. The sole is either cemented to the upper using a pneumatic press or attached to the upper using a LOWA-exclusive Monowrap frame rubber mould which PU is injected directly into. If this method is used the bonds are cured immediately in a cooling chamber to ensure optimum connectivity.

The spray-on glueing process that we use throughout the treatment of the outsoles is crucial to ensuring our leather boots are durable but also breathable. It is vital that air and moisture can flow freely out of the boots whilst maintaining their waterproof properties. With these considerations in mind, LOWA uses an exclusive spray-on glueing process which provides the strong connection these leather boots require whilst allowing the pores of the material to remain open and circulate moisture out of the boot.

How To Prevent Hydrolysis​

As durable as our leather boots are manufactured to be, it is crucial that they are cared for in the correct way to ensure this level of quality is maintained. To prevent the effects of hydrolysis we’ve put together a shoebox of tricks on how to store and care for your leather boots. In order to successfully combat the damaging effects of hydrolysis we recommend that you keep your leather boots clean and cool by doing the following:

- Store your leather boots in a dry and well-ventilated space

- Keep your leather boots away from sources of heat and avoid exposing them to high temperatures

- Clean your leather boots regularly, especially after walking through muck and manure

Providing the correct storage and care for your leather boots is crucial to ensuring they live a long and happy life. However, the wisest piece of advice which we can really give to keep your leather boots healthy is to get outdoors. Before longer trips take your leather boots on a short test run to check for signs of hydrolysis- this is particularly important if you know your boots have been hidden at the back of the cupboard for a while.

It’s crucial to remember that leather boots are designed to be worn in outdoor terrain and so the easiest way to prevent hydrolysis is to keep your boots moving in the open air. This way Hydrolysis doesn’t have the right conditions to wreak its usual havoc allowing the soles of your leather boots to remain intact. Whether it’s a hike, a trek or a short stroll, any outdoor activity will be doing those leather boots a massive favour.

With this advice and the right quality leather boots, hydrolysis shouldn’t be troubling you too much in the future. For more information on the durable footwear options available at LOWA please explore the products on our website.

Mine are still fine, 12 years of part-time wear. Generally only wear my Mountain GTX in the winter time and wear the Lowa Renegade in the summer out in the Ulu and on the range. The Mountain GTX could probably do with a resole in the near future.
 

ACAB

LE
I've worn Lowas whilst working in places hot and sandy,. Typically, I've found that though they are very comfortable, they do not last beyond the normal 6 month contract and therefore went through 3 pairs.

I, in the end, gravitated towards Meindl which lasted the whole 18 months of my last tour and then some when I came home.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Holy thread resurrection.

I've got a pair of Lowa combat GTX and they've had a bit of hammer over the winter and I have watched both heels basically fall apart. Prior two two hours a day walking in wet conditions for 4 months, they stood unused for donkeys in a cupboard. Pretty piss poor performance for a military grade boot.

I've still got a pair of Boots Combat High lurking around somewhere from a thousand years ago and they performed stacks better than what I now feel is a useless and expensive pile of junk.

Well unimpressed.
Mine haven’t been used since last winter, same thing happened and as posted, sadly it will happen. It didn’t happen with old boots with rock hard soles.
 
I've worn Lowas whilst working in places hot and sandy,. Typically, I've found that though they are very comfortable, they do not last beyond the normal 6 month contract and therefore went through 3 pairs.

I, in the end, gravitated towards Meindl which lasted the whole 18 months of my last tour and then some when I came home.

I’d say mine have gone in 3 - 4 months. Not much use for a supposed military grade boot and the piece they have on their web site which I copied and pasted above looks like it’s a major arse covering exercise as they know the boots fall apart.
 

bluebell99

Clanker
Lowa Renegade GTX Mid/Wide. Bought these for dog walking in winter, general outdoors recreational stuff, standing on touch lines etc. Comfortable straight out of the box, waterproof, feet don't get hot (or cold). In short, hugely impressed. However, most of my boot wearing experience featured the unloved Boots DMS, so the bar is pretty low.
 

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