Let's discuss Autism

Well at least you can admit to it and didn't bite ;-) ... mate i lived in an 3 room room, ground floor council flat with no hot running water, no bathroom, an open fire or a paraffin heater for warmth, and an outside bog with only a candle for a light for the first 11 years of my life, along with my bruv, Sis Mum and Dad, no big deal , it was common for 1000's of us right up until the mid 70's in Bermondsey.

Your answer shows how over indulged you were.
70's Bermondsey! - Makes 50's Newcastle look positively civilised.;)
A candle for light - sheer bloody luxury!! Me granny's outdoor netty was lit by starlight, except when it was cloudy (which was most nights). It was that dark, you had to sing so anyone else coming for a dump would know it was occupied. I suppose it was the wooden bog seat that made it the height of oppulence.
 

Slime

LE
I like my routine. I have a certain way of doing things and I don't deviate from that.

I have a photographic memory especially for faces and places. I only have to see a face once and I'll recognise it again years down the line. I only have to drive to a place once and I'll know how to get there again without a map or sat nav.
I’ve just skimmed the thread.

Something very worth noting is that one major sympton of Autism/Aspergers is a lack of ability to see or read faces.
Some clients of mine didnt even see people’s eyes on their faces, let alone see eye shapes or colours etc.

This is why people with Autism rarely look someone in the face during conversations.

Once you are aware of this it’s a very recognisable feature.
 

Slime

LE
I’m glad the thread drift from the other thread spawned this new thread :)
 

Slime

LE
As people have mentioned diagnosis.
I live roughly in the Bristol area.
Ive accompanied many people to their GP to ask for a diagnosis. In every case the GP said it was very hard, cost lots of money and would take ages, but I’m very pushy and don’t take no for an answer and in one case got a diagnosis from start to finish for someone on the NHS in three months.
 
Depends what kind of dinosaur.

You see there were various species, such as Tyranosaurus, Pleiseiosaur, Triceratops, Diplodocus, Allosaurus, Brontosaurus, etc.
Originally a Tyranosaurus, more a Diplodocus now!
 
Son got diagnosed with autism and severe ADHD. We went private to speed things along so he’s got his diagnosis before the age of 5 which helps a lot and also explains a lot.

the paediatrician in her wash up meeting with SWMBO mentioned I had both as well. (She picked that up in about 30 seconds)

before this I put it down to us being bad parents.

my wife some it up though, we’ve lost the son we had hoped for but gained another gem instead.
Not too dissimilar to our situation. Oldest (17) neurotypical (or whatever passes for normal teenager these days).
Younger is a little more complex. You wouldn't spot it at first (unless you know), he would come across as shy or just give you one word answers, Once comfortable with you he will talk, and talk, about all sorts of stuff, but has obsessions that come and go. Routine is a must. School, especially homework is an absolute battlefield and 90% of teachers just don't get it or want to get it. We've tried Private and state schooling.

He had absence seizures when he was in Junior school. Thankfully he "grew out" out of the them, but the medication that was controlling it is also a mood suppressant.
So when he was taken off the meds, as he was now seizure free; we noticed something else was going on.
It looked like ADHD/Autism, NHS has long waiting lists and is a postcode lottery. But speed is of the essence here, the sooner you can get it diagnosed and get treatment going the better for the child IMHO. Its not about making them "manageable", we just need him to be able to fit in with the kids/regime at school so he can get an education.
We bit the bullet and went private. we used the Priory in Edgbaston in Birmingham (2hrs each way per appt). He was diagnosed with ADHD (we also Autism, Dsypraxia, Hyper mobility) at 8 yrs old. Once we got a treament plan and medication sorted (Medikinect). We then transitioned back to NHS, who tried to make us start again, but as we had medication and a plan going they relented. The fact that we had we were seeing a leading NHS consultant privately.. don't get me started.

IMPORTANT. You need a PAEDIATRIC PSYCHIATRIST first, then the Psychologist. The first diagnoses, the second treats. We've also paid for education psychology assessment.
It has cost us, financially, emotionally etc. But it has to be done. I liked the comment about losing a son and gaining a gem. Its not easy and some days almost break you. But he's 12, he knows about his condition and has embraced it to an extent.

On a more upbeat note, we had an excellent consultant who at the end of one appointment turned to me and said, "so have you been to see your doctor?"
Me "what me? what? ADHD?"
Dr "yes"
Me "oh".
I think to be honest she has a point, I see quite a bit of myself as a youngster in him. So he can thank me for the ADHD. However SWMBO has just done that test and got 33, so we know where the autism is coming from.
(which I'm not surprised about)

ETA: Mrs KoR is an undisputed expert in navigating the NHS, Schools, LAs etc etc. If there is anyone out there with a burning question or at your wits end then PM. I'll happily share what we have learned.
 
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As people have mentioned diagnosis.
I live roughly in the Bristol area.
Ive accompanied many people to their GP to ask for a diagnosis. In every case the GP said it was very hard, cost lots of money and would take ages, but I’m very pushy and don’t take no for an answer and in one case got a diagnosis from start to finish for someone on the NHS in three months.
You're a tramp?
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
Aware that the online test is not a diagnosis, I took it twice, the second time about 30 minutes later. Although some of my answers may have been slightly different both my scores were identical.

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Reading some of the comments written by some of the people who have said they are on the spectrum, I recognise some of them in myself.
 

theinventor

Old-Salt
I'm wondering if it runs in families.
I wonder if its a genetic thing.
Fairly sure it is. My son was diagnosed Aspergers but we got him into a wonderful school and he is learning to deal with it. His mother says he's very like me, and I see much of it in my father, and his father too.
I grew up with an almost Rainman-like ability to look at a machine and guess how it worked (or didn't). Only much later did I realise that wasn't normal and other people couldn't.
It wasn't until my late thirties / early forties thst I attended a series of courses at work designed to teach you "how others perceive you" and "other people have different thinking styles" - total revelation and gave me a toolkit for dealing with other people and how they felt.
Bizarrely, the Army now won't take anyone with a diagnosis but looking at any SNCO or above in the Household Div you'd think it was compulsory! How else could you cope with let alone enjoy their world of alignment, repetition and polishing?
 
70's Bermondsey! - Makes 50's Newcastle look positively civilised.;)
A candle for light - sheer bloody luxury!! Me granny's outdoor netty was lit by starlight, except when it was cloudy (which was most nights). It was that dark, you had to sing so anyone else coming for a dump would know it was occupied. I suppose it was the wooden bog seat that made it the height of oppulence.

Aleppo makes Newcastle look civilized, plus we had to share that candle with 7 other families and the local rent man, when we wen't hiding from him -) ..Did you live with your Nan?
 
if you are managing children with autism, research using raw, unpasteurised camel milk.

There are over 10000 members of this Facebook group sharing knowledge and experiences. Ask a question and someone will help. https://m.facebook.com/groups/225663314116369/?ref=group_browse

I know personally a number of parents who have had results that have amazed doctors.

I’m not selling anything and have no skin in this game. If it helps, all good. Happy to answer PMs as best I can. No abuse please.
 
Fairly sure it is. My son was diagnosed Aspergers but we got him into a wonderful school and he is learning to deal with it. His mother says he's very like me, and I see much of it in my father, and his father too.
I grew up with an almost Rainman-like ability to look at a machine and guess how it worked (or didn't). Only much later did I realise that wasn't normal and other people couldn't.
It wasn't until my late thirties / early forties thst I attended a series of courses at work designed to teach you "how others perceive you" and "other people have different thinking styles" - total revelation and gave me a toolkit for dealing with other people and how they felt.
Bizarrely, the Army now won't take anyone with a diagnosis but looking at any SNCO or above in the Household Div you'd think it was compulsory! How else could you cope with let alone enjoy their world of alignment, repetition and polishing?

Most of us just use this site to see 'How others perceive you' ....it seems to be pretty accurate :)
 
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...
Bizarrely, the Army now won't take anyone with a diagnosis but looking at any SNCO or above in the Household Div you'd think it was compulsory! How else could you cope with let alone enjoy their world of alignment, repetition and polishing?
The rules are, to the best of my knowledge, that if a prospective recruit does okay in the face to face interview with the Careers Office people, they are considered to be suitable, regardless of any diagnosis of autism/Asperger's.
 

Sackerson

Old-Salt
(Edited for brevity)

I agree 100% with that one. When I was a tiny tot the only remote contact you had with people was by letter/phone.
Nowadays people have 'friends' all over the world but wouldn't recognise them across a room.

One of the Chefettes was/is into horses, the other very much a computer player playing wargames etc a lot.

Both went to Uni, horsey one made friends and had a whale of a time. PC one less so although that changed in the last couple of years when they joined a re-enactment society and had to socialise.

I wonder if the rise of internet 'socialising' has given rise to a generation of people whose autistic tendencies are exacerbated by being able to hide/retreat behind a computer screen when dealing with life and people?
I believe you're right.
 
I have a nephew who, at the hight of the Autism diagnosis craze told me that it made him special and he would have an incredible career in IT (he spent every night playing games on a laptop)

He now stacks shelves in a supermarket. I am still a banker.
 

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