Lessons in history needed!

Discussion in 'ACF' started by suits_U, Apr 19, 2006.

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  1. Recently I have noticed that amongst all the chavs rockers and mini SAS wannabes and even the good hard working cadets, there is an absolutely digusting amount of lack of knowledge on the history behind the army and the UK in general. One quote that really got my back up was this.
    'Ive heard of WWII but dont know much about it'

    After deciding not to launch the little git I enquired some more. I was given lots of information on regimental history but as for the dates of world wars D-day landings etc the majority didnt have a fecking clue. I thought to myself 'Do these people even no why they march to and from church once a year in a big parade?'
    It really pees me off that they know absolutely feck all about history. Sign of the times I guess. What the fueck are they learning in history class.
    rant over
    So what can be done about it.
    Thoughts of maybe spending a bit of time teaching them a few things about the past sprang to mind. When time allows it obviously.
    But then I thought Im not a fecking teacher and they wouldnt want to sit in a school type enviroment in their free time.
    I thought maybe trips to museums etc could work and maybe even a battlefield tour??
    Has anyone else come across this horrifying fact and has anyone taken cadets on a battlefield tour or even to museums.
    Examples would be a great help and any info on them.
    Would it be even possible to organise a trip abroad like a battlefield tour or would i get strung up in red tape?

  2. if you are within reach of London the iwm and the Royal Army Museum are highly recommended
  3. I was thinking of those. Ive never benn there myself as im in the midlands but have heard good things about them.
  4. I recommend the tree of knowledge if that's still allowed in cadets... teach them normally and then question them. Tree of knowledge there and back until everyone gets it right :p
  5. Suits_U,

    If I remember rightly, get yourself down to an Army Recruitment Centre (or whatever the Fcuk they call them now days) and ask for the schools information pack. You get within all sorts of shi-ite such as copies of WW1 postcards from the trenches, what it was like at Etaples and various study packs from different points in British History. (I will skype the other half and get you the exact name of the pack later) Guaranteed to interest even the biggest chav wannabee (for 15 seconds anyway)

    Best of Luck

  6. Nope, Im off to France with my Coy soon, 40 kids going.

    Pm me if you want some more details mate.

  7. As a History/English teacher I can confirm that the problem is that the syllabus does not allow time to teach all we want. For example WW1 is taught at Standard Grade in Scotland whereas WW2 is taught at 5-14 and usually consists of projects such as life on the Home Front, rationing or the Blitz for the S1/S2 (12-13years), with the Normans and the Wild West of America for example as the other topics. Learning the real nitty gritty doesn't take place until they do it at Higher or above where they start looking at the reasons and the histography. With only a couple of elssons a week (and in some schools they only get one a week) it is impossible to get as much as we'd like into their heads. Which is why I prefer English - at least I have them for four or five lessons a week and can really get into something in detail.

    HOWEVER the school where I did a placement last year takes a group of Std Grade and Higher students to France or Belgium every year. The kids fight for the right to join the trip and badly behaved kids don't get in, simple as that. Good incentive. The kids research the names on the local war memorial, often finding relatives and they can then visit their great grandfathers' graves. This is always emotional and they learn a lot. If you can do something like this or tie it into your regiment then so much the better. It is a nightmare to organise and keep 20-30 kids in check and out of the pub but well worth it.
  8. I think there is an iwm north - not sure where possibly Leeds?
  9. leeds armoury?!

    also you could think about getting in touch with your regimental museum - or the nearest one, they might have some old bits oif kit which woul dat leats spark an interest in the cadets, and get them finding inof out on their own initiative? Or perhaps get in touch with some re-enactors - give th ecadets a chance to dress up, ponce about with lee enfields or something equally archaic - have a laugh, learn something....

    my two pence
  10. There is an IWM North, it is in Manchester.
  11. IWM North, Is in Salford Quays and very easy to find and an interesting day out, walk over the bridge and your at the Lowry Arts centre, also worth taking a look.

  13. Thanks for all the feedback so for guys.
    I understand the lack of time in schools to teach so much history, however I feel that teaching them about how this country came to be is more important than the american west, however i appreciate the fact that you have to introduce something like that so as they know other things went on in the world.
    Maybe a trip to the war and peace show in july may teach them a few things?


    A huge military fair full of re-enactors and military kit past and present apparently
  14. Maybe a trip to the war and peace show in july may teach them a few things?


    Whilst a trip to the show will enhance knowledge of history, it will also show one how to be a Walt, there are thousands of them there.
  15. Airborne March, Holland