Leicester City Helicopter Crash

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Yet there are USPDs who use them over urban areas.
Perhaps they maintain them properly? Himself has the view that as they are cheap, the owners can't really afford them and skimp on maintenance.

Whatever the reason, I now won't travel in one!
 
Perhaps they maintain them properly? Himself has the view that as they are cheap, the owners can't really afford them and skimp on maintenance.

Whatever the reason, I now won't travel in one!
Robinsons are notoriously unforgiving of any piloting errors - they also have a few unique quirks of their own.
They are cheap to buy and operate compared with other types so are very popular with training schools. People who learn on them often go on to buy or lease one when they get their licence.
So we end up with a potentially tricky machine flown by low time pilots.

Not saying that is necessarily the case in this accident.
 
Perhaps they maintain them properly? Himself has the view that as they are cheap, the owners can't really afford them and skimp on maintenance.

Whatever the reason, I now won't travel in one!

Wot @BareGrills said!

I've never even sat in a Robinson, let alone flown one, but this is ARRSE so I feel compelled to give you my opinion anyway!

They were designed to be affordable, and some of the things done to achieve that mean that they need to be treated a bit more carefully than beefier helicopters. If the engine conks-out you've got much less time to react before the aircraft goes into 'brick' mode. If you fly too fast in gusty conditions you can end-up chopping your own tail off (which rarely ends well). And - in what may have happened in this instance - catching a single skid on the ground while moving, is particularly unforgiving.

The phrase I've heard is "If you can fly a Robinson, you can fly anything", which doesn't fill me with confidence TBH...
 
I do not like the R22 and I would not fly in one but there are literally thousands of professional helicopter pilots who started their careers in them for one reason.

They’re cheap to operate.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
There's a couple of helicopter sight-seeing tour businesses near me. One has a couple of R44s (slightly less cheese used during manufacture than the R22), and the other one has a couple of Bell 206s.

It never ceases to amaze me how many people go for the R44 over the 206. I think one is $9/seat, the other $13.

That said, one of the 206s spanked in a couple years ago, taking 5 souls with it.

Give me a military helo any day. I don't like little ones!
 
That's true too!
Sorry I just realised that you're a cousin and therefore may fail to understand the truly British sentiment I expressed ;-)
 
Not by birth I'm not, so erm, yes, I did completely understand where your depraved mind was going :)
Depraved?! Shurely shome mishtake old chap.
 
Wot @BareGrills said!

I've never even sat in a Robinson, let alone flown one, but this is ARRSE so I feel compelled to give you my opinion anyway!

They were designed to be affordable, and some of the things done to achieve that mean that they need to be treated a bit more carefully than beefier helicopters. If the engine conks-out you've got much less time to react before the aircraft goes into 'brick' mode. If you fly too fast in gusty conditions you can end-up chopping your own tail off (which rarely ends well). And - in what may have happened in this instance - catching a single skid on the ground while moving, is particularly unforgiving.

The phrase I've heard is "If you can fly a Robinson, you can fly anything", which doesn't fill me with confidence TBH...
@redshift walt
 

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