Leaving the army????????

Would you stay in if you where in my situation?

  • Yes

    Votes: 13 41.9%
  • No

    Votes: 10 32.3%
  • Stick it out a little long

    Votes: 8 25.8%

  • Total voters
    31
Thank you for reading this post first time in doing something like this. I am after some help/ advice on a situation.


I am a current serving soldier at the rank of Sgt in the army (just over 12 years in) and been thinking about getting out for about 2 years now. Keep saying to myself just keep going it will get better, next rank it will get better but it doesn't. All that keeps going on in my head is give it ago your still young enough (31) to start a new life on civi street. A part of me cant see myself pushing another 10 years of this. Some people I speak to say do it best decision I made wish I did it sooner. On the flip side you get the grass is not greener stay in. I have spoke to some of my CoC and got the good old stay in off some and others say think you should stay you have a great career ahead but wont force you. I am not sure what am after from this post or even if this will help but hay it's worth a try.

Thanks in advance

Mike
 

TheSockPuppet

On ROPS
On ROPs
Unless you've got some niche quals and a firm job offer that pays well above what you earn now, stay in.

If you leave, almost nobody will give a square **** that you were a 12 year Sgt, and you will be straight back to the bottom rung along with that 18 year old tea-boy with no GCSEs.

The Army has many shit points, but you don't seem to have a specific reason for leaving. Have a brew, go for a walk, clear your head and crack on. It's almost Xmas leave anyway.
 
Suck it up Buttercup. Forty-one is a great age to retire for the first time...

And, get the Army to pay for some school while your still in.
 
I disagree with sock puppet. You’re at a good point to leave and a good age and rank to do so. You will get a job and you will do well in it. I understand it’s terrifying. I thought exactly the same way, until I did a placement at Barclays, it made me realise I had many more worthwhile skills and attributes than many there and I stopped worrying.

If you really aren’t happy sign off, do something different. If it doesn’t work out you can always rejoin, it’s nice to have that in your back pocket if you need it.
 
You'll be glad to have 2 pensions in another 30 years...
 
Do as much as you can on the Army's dollar education wise, research areas of interest (post Army) and exploit as much as possible those things that will be of benefit in a post Army career. It might even make the upcoming years of service a little more enjoyable. Screw the nut, but at the same time keep a mercenary eye open for opportunities.
 
It all depends on the individual’s skills and interests. With a marketable skill/trade, I agree with @dingerr, right time, right rank. But if you’re an RP Sgt, not so much (other unmarketable jobs available).

I left as a Sgt at the 10 year point and it‘s worked out. But it depends on the individual circumstances.
 
I know you're looking for advice but without details of your current trade then it's a hard one to advise on.
I left at the 9 year point aged 28, got a great job in IT and retired aged 55. I was a REME tech with a good trade though. It would help if you give a hint as to your current job.
 
At 31, you are young enough to do pretty much anything you want in life. You can retrain, re-skill, get educated. There’s very little that’s closed to you.

My LinkedIn contacts include upwards of 50 or so who left the services around your age in ranks varying from LCpl to Captain. Very few are doing things that have any connection with what they did in uniform and most have been very successful.

A few examples; RE Plant Op LCpl now a super yacht skipper. EoD Cpl now running his own multi-practice law firm with >50 staff. Infantry Cpl now running a very successful social media advertising agency and another who owns three gyms.

IMHO the time to leave is when you first think about it. Don’t hang on, hoping for the next promotion getting bitter. And ignore the naysayers who didn’t follow their dreams. Life is too short not to seize opportunities. As @dingerr says, you can always go back.
 
@The OP. I was in a very similar position at my 12 year point. I chose to leave despite everyone telling me to stay. It was the best and worst decision of my career. I once sat down and started to work out how much gratuity and pension I'd missed out on but had to stop when my eyes filled with tears. 20 years down the line and I'm happily established in a career I both excel at and enjoy. Good luck whatever you choose to do.
 
Unless you've got some niche quals and a firm job offer that pays well above what you earn now, stay in.

If you leave, almost nobody will give a square **** that you were a 12 year Sgt, and you will be straight back to the bottom rung along with that 18 year old tea-boy with no GCSEs.

The Army has many shit points, but you don't seem to have a specific reason for leaving. Have a brew, go for a walk, clear your head and crack on. It's almost Xmas leave anyway.
Not so. There are many schemes, such as the financial sector, who take NCOs and accelerate them into executive positions. Selection is tough but I have yet to meet any who wished to be back on uniform, at least full time.

I've left on medical grounds (enhanced pension - yee ha!) and haven't looked back, as I've moved in to consultancy. I was trying to avoid the defence area but first assignment was MOD, and enjoyed it immensely. My only regret is that I hadn't left 10 years earlier, and that I don't get as much leave (and difficult to slide off for phys or an early stack).
 
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I disagree with sock puppet. You’re at a good point to leave and a good age and rank to do so. You will get a job and you will do well in it. I understand it’s terrifying. I thought exactly the same way, until I did a placement at Barclays, it made me realise I had many more worthwhile skills and attributes than many there and I stopped worrying.

If you really aren’t happy sign off, do something different. If it doesn’t work out you can always rejoin, it’s nice to have that in your back pocket if you need it.
Barclays are a very good firm; I also did a placement with them - very supportive bunch.
 
Would rebadge/retrade help? Might make you feel happier and perhaps you can aim to get something that helps you do what you want to do when you leave.

Maybe even the Navy or RAF, if you are really desperate that is :)
 
I did the other 10 years and absolutely hated it but the pension trap left very little choice.
Thankfully the '75 pension and subsequent WP made it worthwhile but the slog during the amalgamations (1990-2000) was almost unbearable. During my 22 the Army had effectively become a politically correct police force....
HTH
 
Unless you've got some niche quals and a firm job offer that pays well above what you earn now, stay in.

If you leave, almost nobody will give a square **** that you were a 12 year Sgt, and you will be straight back to the bottom rung along with that 18 year old tea-boy with no GCSEs.

The Army has many shit points, but you don't seem to have a specific reason for leaving. Have a brew, go for a walk, clear your head and crack on. It's almost Xmas leave anyway.
Best of luck with a firm job offer that'll wait a year for you to turn up.

If in doubt, get out, and get on.
 
Best of luck with a firm job offer that'll wait a year for you to turn up.
Late 90's the RAF were shedding people left, right and centre. If you had a firm job offer you could be out in 3 months (with resettlement, leave etc. you could be in your civvie job in 6 weeks). Got a job offer, went to chief clerk who spoke to me next day, "Sorry but you're too highly skilled, they won't let you out for a year". Feck! Pondered a couple of days and put my papers in to leave in a year. Lucky me a very similar job came up 6 months later, applied and got it, started working for them 3 months before I left (eventually did 25 years, was engaged to age 55, left at 42 years old).
 
I left at a similar age and time served as you, and with the same thoughts. As above education is the key, look at OU or Adult Education if you can. It isn't easy getting out and starting again, but if you work hard and use the skills you have learnt in the Army you can move up the ladder pretty quick, I went from Network Admin to IT Manager in a little under 6 years and have recently been offered a consultancy post after 20 years doing the job.

My civvy job has no relation to my Army career, but I left wanting a clean break and also saw it as a chance to do something I enjoy doing, and you have that opportunity to take stock and think about what you really want to do, work towards the Quals that you need and also use your resettlement to embellish those skills and knowledge.

Be prepared for a different world though, Civvies are funny beasts and you will sometimes be very frustrated at how they operate.
 
I left at a similar age and time served as you, and with the same thoughts. As above education is the key, look at OU or Adult Education if you can. It isn't easy getting out and starting again, but if you work hard and use the skills you have learnt in the Army you can move up the ladder pretty quick, I went from Network Admin to IT Manager in a little under 6 years and have recently been offered a consultancy post after 20 years doing the job.

My civvy job has no relation to my Army career, but I left wanting a clean break and also saw it as a chance to do something I enjoy doing, and you have that opportunity to take stock and think about what you really want to do, work towards the Quals that you need and also use your resettlement to embellish those skills and knowledge.

Be prepared for a different world though, Civvies are funny beasts and you will sometimes be very frustrated at how they operate.
I did OU in the RAF, they paid and summer school was pretty much at her majesties expense and time off :) Went into exactly the same profession. I was an Air Traffic Controller in the RAF, in civvie street I was (to start) a pseudo controller (in the simulator, no real people to kill), no secondary duties, no man management and shift pay! Earned more plus there was a final salary pension! Within 7 years I'd had 3 promotions and ended up fairly senior, eventually moved onto consultancy. Spent the first half of this year working for the Indonesian government, which was very interesting, several trips to Jakarta and a week in Bali, never cost me a penny and I got paid :) Cheers easy!
 
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