Learning German

Learnt my german in the pubs and clubs in the 80's and trying to get in the womens pants....the only way to learn.
 
Bugsy said:
"Nein, und das ist alles anders als schwäbisch, da ich einige gute Freunde dort habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen soll."
Again, sorry, but in German I think it should be: ... alles anderes...
But wtf do I know, sorry again and thanks for putting me in my place. Thanks, again.
 

Bugsy

LE
para_medic said:
Bugsy said:
"Nein, und das ist alles anders als schwäbisch, da ich einige gute Freunde dort habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen soll."
Again, sorry, but in German I think it should be: ... alles anderes...
But wtf do I know, sorry again and thanks for putting me in my place. Thanks, again.
Like I said, mucker, you don't know enough German to put forward an opinion. Try again.

Let me put that in German: Wie ich sagte, Alter, du bist nicht der deutschen Sprache ausreichend mächtig, um eine Meinung darüber zu äußern. Versuch's nochmal.

MsG
 

zulu-uhlu

Old-Salt
Pararegtom said:
zulu-uhlu said:
Bugsy said:
Reading the books I have I find the word order difficult and also the der die das aspect. One thing I wonder though is - if I used "der" instead of "die" or "das" - would what I said be still understood or could it change the whole context?
MsG
It is also interesting to note that the genders sometimes change when going from singular to plural!

Der Soldat.................The Soldier (Singular, Masculine)

Die Soldaten.............. The Soldiers (Plural, Feminine)

So, one Soldier is a proper bloke :D
but two or more Soldiers are a bunch of Nancy Boys! 8O

Yes it can be difficult.
Some good advice dispensed so far, but there is another fast track way to learn the spoken language.
Find yourself a nice friendly German pub, where no English go.
Where you have to speak the language, no matter how bad.
You will find that the Germans will help you in between bouts of laughter.
Too much time in Osnatraz ZU?
Ah! The Traz!

What a wonderful time I had in Quebec Kaserne & also the Klausenmühle in Bavaria!
 
Bugsy said:
para_medic said:
Bugsy said:
"Nein, und das ist alles anders als schwäbisch, da ich einige gute Freunde dort habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen soll."
Again, sorry, but in German I think it should be: ... alles anderes...
But wtf do I know, sorry again and thanks for putting me in my place. Thanks, again.
Like I said, mucker, you don't know enough German to put forward an opinion. Try again.

Let me put that in German: Wie ich sagte, Alter, du bist nicht der deutschen Sprache ausreichend mächtig, um eine Meinung darüber zu äußern. Versuch's nochmal.

MsG
Absolutely, and thanks, again.
But in German, I think, it should be: "...du bist der deutschen Sprache nicht ausreichend mächtig, um eine Meinung darüber zu äußern."
But you are quite right, I stand corrected and will do so forever and ever in light of your superiour knowledge. Thanks again, really.
 
"Geben Sie mir mein Fahrrad zurück!"

although really that should be something closer to...

"Geben Sie das Fahrrad des Grossvaters meines Freunds zurück"

With regards to "thinking in" one's second language, if I'm in a situation where I am speaking Dutch, I tend to have my inner monologue in Dutch. I'm a fluent, but not perfect Dutch speaker (I get the genders of nouns wrong fairly often, and occasionally run out of vocabulary in certain situations where the conversation gets technical and out of my areas of knowledge.)

What often helps is to watch television in the target language and to put the subtitles on, since reading is always easier than listening.

With Dutch there is the advantage to watch English/American television with Dutch subtitles, which is an incredibly fast way to improve vocabulary.

Another thing that worked for me was to read Harry Potter books in translation, since I knew the stories already, and they are ripping yarns but not too complicated.

Yesterday was an odd one though -- I ended up speaking a mixture of English, Dutch (second language) and German (4th language), depending on to whom I was talking... that got confusing after I got tired!
 
Way back in the days of the poison dwarves saga, the Army introduced official German courses. Intensive language laboratory with students on booth linked by earphones. The programme said a phrase and each student repeated it. Done 3 times. The instructor would monitor and direct a student to repeat the phrase. Very effective. I was an unwilling student; I went because I would have detested doing it under orders which as a mp were likely to be given. I got fluent and still use German now if I need to so it stuck for me.
See if there are such language lab courses is my advice.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
I did the AEC German courses up to colloquiel roundabout the same time as a mate of mine enrolled at the local German College. He faired better than me as he was in a class amongst a variety of foreign national students and the only common language they had was the German they were learning, whereas we spent a lot of time discussing German grammar in English. I agree with the posters who say get in at the deep end. Once you've overcome the initial embarrassment, and that's what it boils down to in the main, you're on your way. In my experience the Germans are only to ready to lend a hand (but that was mainly down the Eros Centre and cost me 50 Euro).
 
I did the Beconsfield 6 week course in '84 before being catapulted into Baden -Wurrtemberg. My two very young daughters went into the local grund schule without any background in German. Within a few months both girls were fairly fluent, while I coughed and farted my way through briefings, wondering if I was using the past, future,/ conditional / pluperfect in the correct manner.

Children learn to communicate and have no ego about asking questions or getting it 'wrong'. There's a lesson there.
 
Bugsy said:
Skuse me, but I can't get rid of the feeling that you might be a Boxheed. If I retrotranslate the following:

YesItsMe said:
"Nope, and that is everything but schwäbisch, since I got some good friends there and know the way it should sound and look."
I get:

"Nein, und das ist alles anders als schwäbisch, da ich einige gute Freunde dort habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen soll."

Gehe ich recht in meiner Annahme?

Übrigens, der Begriff "Schwabe" umfasst Deutsche generell in der Schweiz, und nicht nur die Schwaben.

MsG
In Deutschland bezeichnet der Begriff 'Schwabe' tatsächlich nur die 'Schwaben' und hat mit der Schweiz als solches nichts zu tun.

Die Übersetzung ist nicht schlecht, vollkommen richtig müsste es heißen:
'Nein, und das ist alles andere als Schwäbisch, da ist dort einige gute Freunde habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen sollte.'

Der Konjunktiv wird im deutschen anders gebildet als im englischen: Ähnlich wie der gesamte Aufbau der Grammatik, lehnt sich das Deutsche stark an die lateinische Sprache, was sich nicht nur in der Anzahl der Kasi und Geni und somit Möglichkeiten der Deklinationen und Konjugation zeigt.
Aber das soll hier nicht in einem Vortrag über die deutsche Sprache enden. ;)
 
para_medic said:
Absolutely, and thanks, again.
But in German, I think, it should be: "...du bist der deutschen Sprache nicht ausreichend mächtig, um eine Meinung darüber zu äußern."
But you are quite right, I stand corrected and will do so forever and ever in light of your superiour knowledge. Thanks again, really.

You are absolutely right, PM. :)
 
Alec_Lomas said:
I did the Beconsfield 6 week course in '84 before being catapulted into Baden -Wurrtemberg. My two very young daughters went into the local grund schule without any background in German. Within a few months both girls were fairly fluent, while I coughed and farted my way through briefings, wondering if I was using the past, future,/ conditional / pluperfect in the correct manner.

Children learn to communicate and have no ego about asking questions or getting it 'wrong'. There's a lesson there.
You couldn't put it in better words !!
 
YesItsMe said:
Bugsy said:
Skuse me, but I can't get rid of the feeling that you might be a Boxheed. If I retrotranslate the following:

YesItsMe said:
"Nope, and that is everything but schwäbisch, since I got some good friends there and know the way it should sound and look."
I get:

"Nein, und das ist alles anders als schwäbisch, da ich einige gute Freunde dort habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen soll."

Gehe ich recht in meiner Annahme?

Übrigens, der Begriff "Schwabe" umfasst Deutsche generell in der Schweiz, und nicht nur die Schwaben.

MsG
In Deutschland bezeichnet der Begriff 'Schwabe' tatsächlich nur die 'Schwaben' und hat mit der Schweiz als solches nichts zu tun.

Die Übersetzung ist nicht schlecht, vollkommen richtig müsste es heißen:
'Nein, und das ist alles andere als Schwäbisch, da ist dort einige gute Freunde habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen sollte.'

Der Konjunktiv wird im deutschen anders gebildet als im englischen: Ähnlich wie der gesamte Aufbau der Grammatik, lehnt sich das Deutsche stark an die lateinische Sprache, was sich nicht nur in der Anzahl der Kasi und Geni und somit Möglichkeiten der Deklinationen und Konjugation zeigt.
Aber das soll hier nicht in einem Vortrag über die deutsche Sprache enden. ;)
Das kommt mir Spanische vor :D
 

Bugsy

LE
YesItsMe said:
In Deutschland bezeichnet der Begriff 'Schwabe' tatsächlich nur die 'Schwaben' und hat mit der Schweiz als solches nichts zu tun.

Die Übersetzung ist nicht schlecht, vollkommen richtig müsste es heißen:
'Nein, und das ist alles andere als Schwäbisch, da ist dort einige gute Freunde habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen sollte.'

Der Konjunktiv wird im deutschen anders gebildet als im englischen: Ähnlich wie der gesamte Aufbau der Grammatik, lehnt sich das Deutsche stark an die lateinische Sprache, was sich nicht nur in der Anzahl der Kasi und Geni und somit Möglichkeiten der Deklinationen und Konjugation zeigt.
Aber das soll hier nicht in einem Vortrag über die deutsche Sprache enden
. ;)
Es ist tatsächlich so, dass the Deutschen generell in der Schweiz nicht sonderlich beliebt sind. Nicht zuletzt deshalb, weil Leute wie z.B. Emil Steinberger und Kurt Felix den Schweizer Dialekt zum Witz degradiert haben. Auch müssen Schweizer SchauspielerInnen einwandfrei Hochdeutsch beherrschen, bevor sie auf deutschen Bühnen auftreten dürfen. Hamburger oder Bayer (um nur zwei Beispiele zu nennen) hingegen können weitgehend bei ihren Urdialekten bleiben, oder eine gweisse dialektbedingte Klanverfärbung ohne Nachteil durchschimmern lassen. Das dünkt die Schweizer etwas unfair und führt dann verständlicherweise zu einem gewissen Groll den Deutschen gegenüber. Deswegen werden Deutsche oftmals abschätzig als "Schwaabe' bezeichnet.

Es stimmt mit der starken Anlehnung des Deutschen an Latein. Obgleich der fünfte lateinische Fall (der Ablativfall) in der deutschen Sprache keine Verwendung findet.

Und keine Bange, Vorträge, gleich welchen Inhaltes, sind immer willkommen - sofern sie einigermaßen interessant sind.

MsG
 
Bugsy said:
YesItsMe said:
In Deutschland bezeichnet der Begriff 'Schwabe' tatsächlich nur die 'Schwaben' und hat mit der Schweiz als solches nichts zu tun.

Die Übersetzung ist nicht schlecht, vollkommen richtig müsste es heißen:
'Nein, und das ist alles andere als Schwäbisch, da ist dort einige gute Freunde habe und weiß, wie es aussehen und klingen sollte.'

Der Konjunktiv wird im deutschen anders gebildet als im englischen: Ähnlich wie der gesamte Aufbau der Grammatik, lehnt sich das Deutsche stark an die lateinische Sprache, was sich nicht nur in der Anzahl der Kasi und Geni und somit Möglichkeiten der Deklinationen und Konjugation zeigt.
Aber das soll hier nicht in einem Vortrag über die deutsche Sprache enden
. ;)
Es ist tatsächlich so, dass the Deutschen generell in der Schweiz nicht sonderlich beliebt sind. Nicht zuletzt deshalb, weil Leute wie z.B. Emil Steinberger und Kurt Felix den Schweizer Dialekt zum Witz degradiert haben. Auch müssen Schweizer SchauspielerInnen einwandfrei Hochdeutsch beherrschen, bevor sie auf deutschen Bühnen auftreten dürfen. Hamburger oder Bayer (um nur zwei Beispiele zu nennen) hingegen können weitgehend bei ihren Urdialekten bleiben, oder eine gweisse dialektbedingte Klanverfärbung ohne Nachteil durchschimmern lassen. Das dünkt die Schweizer etwas unfair und führt dann verständlicherweise zu einem gewissen Groll den Deutschen gegenüber. Deswegen werden Deutsche oftmals abschätzig als "Schwaabe' bezeichnet.

Es stimmt mit der starken Anlehnung des Deutschen an Latein. Obgleich der fünfte lateinische Fall (der Ablativfall) in der deutschen Sprache keine Verwendung findet.

Und keine Bange, Vorträge, gleich welchen Inhaltes, sind immer willkommen - sofern sie einigermaßen interessant sind.

MsG
Ich denke, dass sich diese 'Hassliebe' zwischen den Schweizern und Deutschen schon seit sovielen Jahrhunderten ausgelebt hat, dass wir uns schlicht damit abfinden sollten. Immerhin toleriert man sich doch auf freundliche Weise. Das ist schon weit mehr, als einige andere Länder zustande bringen. ;)

Wir waren sogar so dreist nicht nur auf den 'Ablativus absolutus', sondern ebenso auf den 'Vocativ' zu verzichten. :D
 

New Posts

Top