Learning from failure - a Growth Mindset

Tool

LE
Just my two pennyworth as a piano teacher, "muscle memory" (or whatever the scientific term is) certainly does exist when training the fingers to perform certain techniques/passages of music etc.
In mind's eye, I recall (huh!) muscle memory needing around 73 iterations of an activity to be set, and somewhere around 4-6 iteration to "recall" that activity's memory set. That would be a brain/muscle combination.
 
In mind's eye, I recall (huh!) muscle memory needing around 73 iterations of an activity to be set, and somewhere around 4-6 iteration to "recall" that activity's memory set. That would be a brain/muscle combination.
Nothing to do with muscles, apart from perhaps a need for dexterity when performing a task that requires an unusual movement. What happens is the amygdala (known sometimes as the "monkey brain") learns how to do complex routines through rote. Think of when you started to drive; you had to concentrate on every aspect of a gear change, you had to think about the placement of your foot, probably had to look at the gearstick to ensure you could actually get your hand on it, stared at the speedo and tacho whilst you looked for the dials to read what your instructor said they should, crunched the clutch if you didn't pay enough attention... Now you can pull away and change gear whilst holding a cup of coffee in one hand and concentrating on not spilling it, and chatting on your mobile held in the other hand. Your inner chimp is driving, and can do so, because you have taught it to, and he does a better job of it, because he doesn't have to think about it.
 

Yokel

LE
Nothing to do with muscles, apart from perhaps a need for dexterity when performing a task that requires an unusual movement. What happens is the amygdala (known sometimes as the "monkey brain") learns how to do complex routines through rote. Think of when you started to drive; you had to concentrate on every aspect of a gear change, you had to think about the placement of your foot, probably had to look at the gearstick to ensure you could actually get your hand on it, stared at the speedo and tacho whilst you looked for the dials to read what your instructor said they should, crunched the clutch if you didn't pay enough attention... Now you can pull away and change gear whilst holding a cup of coffee in one hand and concentrating on not spilling it, and chatting on your mobile held in the other hand. Your inner chimp is driving, and can do so, because you have taught it to, and he does a better job of it, because he doesn't have to think about it.
Exactly! Developing conscious competence and then converting it to unconscious competence is like using software to perform a certain task, at the expense of system performance, and then installing hardware to do it instead.

However for the brain to do so needs repeated activation of pathways through the brain, which strengthens the connections. However, should the activity not be repeated for a long time then the connections weaken. Conscious thought is needed again.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
.. Now you can pull away and change gear whilst holding a cup of coffee in one hand and concentrating on not spilling it, and chatting on your mobile held in the other hand. Your inner chimp is driving, and can do so, because you have taught it to, and he does a better job of it, because he doesn't have to think about it.
That'll be your inner moron, rather than your inner chimp.

Survival of the fittest and all that … ;-)
 

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